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Using Veritas cabinet scraper to clean up desktop panel post-glue-up?

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Forum topic by HTX_woodworker posted 05-24-2018 01:04 AM 410 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HTX_woodworker

12 posts in 100 days


05-24-2018 01:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: oak planer finishing arts and crafts

Hello all, I’m about to start gluing up a white oak tabletop panel (size: 40”x28”) for a Stickley-inspired lunch table I’m currently working on. I’m trying to determine the best way to clean up and level the desktop after glue-up.

I’ve done a dry run, and the resulting desktop looks good, from what I can tell, with only a few minor height irregularities in a few places. I am still playing around with adjusting the position of the cauls to minimize these irregularities as much as possible. However, I don’t think I’ll be able to eliminate them entirely.

I am attracted to the idea of using a Veritas cabinet scraper to accomplish this task, but was wondering if there are other tools I should be considering? Cheers!


8 replies so far

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bondogaposis

4895 posts in 2434 days


#1 posted 05-24-2018 01:46 AM

Getting the boards level will be harder than the dry run once you juice it with glue, because of the lubrication affect that glue has. Boards will slip around a lot more. It has been my experience that leveling a table top with only a scraper would take forever. A jack plane will go a long way toward leveling the top in a reasonable amount of time. A scraper will come into play as well to clean up any tear tear out and and minor imperfections. Maybe you are more careful than me and can get a near perfect glue up. The more pieces you have in the table top the more of a problem keeping it level will be.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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TungOil

993 posts in 578 days


#2 posted 05-24-2018 01:51 AM

or take the easy way out and find a local cabinet shop with a wide belt sander willing to run your top through for a few bucks. It will take you longer to make the call and drive there the it will take them to flatten a top that size, and it will be perfect when done.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3730 days


#3 posted 05-24-2018 01:52 AM

Alignment dowels can almost eliminate this work.
They take time though. Biscuits are a little
sloppier but quicker.

It’s just elbow grease in any case. A plane will
help get it done faster if you can sense when
to stop planing and start scraping.

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OSU55

1787 posts in 2072 days


#4 posted 05-24-2018 08:17 PM

A cabinet scraper is not the right tool to flatten the top. I do use a #80 to remove dried glue. Then planes are used – for that size panel #7, then a smoothing plane. If it is all fairly smooth grain, you are done. If there is tear out, scrapers of various kinds can be used. If you dont have the tools and dont intend to need them again, calling local shops about planing or drum sanding it for you would be the best solution.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1140 posts in 686 days


#5 posted 05-24-2018 08:54 PM


or take the easy way out and find a local cabinet shop with a wide belt sander willing to run your top through for a few bucks. It will take you longer to make the call and drive there the it will take them to flatten a top that size, and it will be perfect when done.

- TungOil


+1 It will look and feel quite professional.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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AlaskaGuy

4269 posts in 2392 days


#6 posted 05-25-2018 01:17 AM



Alignment dowels can almost eliminate this work.
They take time though. Biscuits are a little
sloppier but quicker.

It s just elbow grease in any case. A plane will
help get it done faster if you can sense when
to stop planing and start scraping.

- Loren


Festool domino, quick and no slop. Don’t get too close to the ends where the might be see if you trim the ends off.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

4269 posts in 2392 days


#7 posted 05-25-2018 01:18 AM


or take the easy way out and find a local cabinet shop with a wide belt sander willing to run your top through for a few bucks. It will take you longer to make the call and drive there the it will take them to flatten a top that size, and it will be perfect when done.

- TungOil

+1 It will look and feel quite professional.

- Andybb


This is the best if you can. IMHO

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3340 posts in 672 days


#8 posted 05-25-2018 01:19 AM

Smart move with the cauls. Even with biscuits or dowels to align the joints, they ensure the result is flat. Taking it to a cabinet shop, if you have one available, for sure will yield a perfect surface.

However, I swear by my 1/2 sheet orbital sander. It’s 40 sq in of flat sanding surface and does the best job of any handheld sander for me. I use it with 80 and 120 grits before moving on to the ROSs for finer grits.

Also, a hand plane will do a great job of initial flattening as well.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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