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Forum topic by mnausa posted 05-23-2018 04:00 PM 525 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mnausa

33 posts in 1984 days


05-23-2018 04:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood species pine cypress wood identification beams

What type of wood is this? This is floor joists and beams from a warehouse in MS, built in 1945. It has a dark patina. I thought it was pine but maybe cypress.

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912


14 replies so far

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ShaneA

7055 posts in 2804 days


#1 posted 05-23-2018 04:03 PM

Looks like a type of pine to me.

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Kilo19

99 posts in 431 days


#2 posted 05-23-2018 06:32 PM

Not real familiar with wood species (so take this with a grain of salt, but I’d say) old growth pine? I demo’d a house while back and that looks awfully familiar.

-- Justin

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TheFridge

10766 posts in 1691 days


#3 posted 05-23-2018 07:08 PM

Alder.

Or pine or cypress. The weathered stuff looks like cypress but the floorboards do not.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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mnausa

33 posts in 1984 days


#4 posted 05-23-2018 08:35 PM

Yes, the floor boards are pine. I’m curious about the beams and floor joists.

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912

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mnausa

33 posts in 1984 days


#5 posted 05-23-2018 08:49 PM

I assumed the floor boards were pine. They do look like Alder now that I looked online.

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912

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gargey

1013 posts in 981 days


#6 posted 05-23-2018 09:35 PM

Grain does look cypressy. Obviously discolored by god-knows-what treatments or plain aging over the years.

Very nice and clear stuff.

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gargey

1013 posts in 981 days


#7 posted 05-23-2018 09:35 PM

WHDLT15 usually has the most informed opinions.

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mnausa

33 posts in 1984 days


#8 posted 05-23-2018 09:51 PM

@WHDLT15

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912

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Woodknack

12431 posts in 2585 days


#9 posted 05-23-2018 10:24 PM

If you ask an experienced carpenter in the area and give him the year and general location, he should be able to tell you without even looking. But ask an actual carpenter, not some guy who owns a hammer.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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TheFridge

10766 posts in 1691 days


#10 posted 05-23-2018 11:24 PM

I’m pretty positive it’s alder. And by alder. I mean cypress. I could pull a cypress board out the shop that has the exact same texture if I wasn’t lazy at the moment.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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oldwood

155 posts in 1449 days


#11 posted 05-24-2018 02:52 AM

Most likely pine. Longleaf if in the southern third of state, not old growth if built in 1945, it had all been cut out by then.

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WDHLT15

1793 posts in 2681 days


#12 posted 05-24-2018 11:38 AM

I would say that it is almost certainly pine. Here is how to tell. Cut a clean slice on the end grain with a very sharp knife or razor knife. Look closely at the growth rings. If it is pine, you will see resin canals. A magnifying glass or hand lens will make it easy to see them if there are there. If it is pine, you will definitely see them.

Cypress does not have resin canals. Here is what a resin canal looks like.

http://www.faculty.sfasu.edu/mcbroommatth/Lectures/Wood_Science/Lab_2_Resin_Canal_Species.PDF

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Lazyman

2644 posts in 1593 days


#13 posted 05-24-2018 12:34 PM

My first impression from the grain was western red cedar but not sure how common that would have been in MS back in the 40’s especially with an easy supply of pine available. I would take a knife and slice off some of the patina to see the underlying color and also see if you can smell the wood. Cedar may still have a pretty distinctive smell. I would also slice the end grain to see if there are resin canals to rule out bald cypress.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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WDHLT15

1793 posts in 2681 days


#14 posted 05-25-2018 12:12 AM

To find western red cedar in Mississippi as joists and floor framing would be highly unusual indeed.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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