LumberJocks

How do you adjust a wooden plane?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Sawdust2 posted 1144 days ago 1049 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2686 days


1144 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: plane wooden

I was given a wooden plane made in Czechoslovakia about 40 years ago. It’s a marvelous tool, still in the original box, and it fits my hand just perfectly.
I’ve gotten the blade sharp but not yet scary sharp.
My problem is that I do not know how to adjust it.
I put the plane blade in and then the wooden wedge.
If I wanted to take off 1/8” that’s about the blade depth.
Other than that I can make if flush to the plate.
Neither one is what I need.
All suggestions tried.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.


7 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12249 posts in 2695 days


#1 posted 1144 days ago

You need a small hammer…

Check out the post by Div.

http://lumberjocks.com/woodspark/blog/23559

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View BarryW's profile

BarryW

1015 posts in 2504 days


#2 posted 1144 days ago

James Krenov has an excellent explanation in his book “A Cabinetmaker’s Notebook”....

-- /\/\/\ BarryW /\/\/\ Stay so busy you don't have time to die.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1596 days


#3 posted 1143 days ago

Small variation on what others said….

I put the plane down on the bench.

Place the blade all the way down to the bench.

Set the wedge and tighten it up a bit.

Now, the blade is almost protruding.

Tap the top of the blade gently and make a test cut.

Repeat until it takes the kind of shaving you are looking for.

If I tap on the back of the plane body to back off the iron, I tap the top of the wedge to make sure it has not loosened up before testing. If it is being a bit touchy, pop the blade all the way out and wipe off the bed and wedge, then start over but re-seat the wedge a bit more firmly.

How hard you tap it depends on how much friction there is between the iron and the bed and how firmly the wedge clamps things down. It sounds a lot harder than it is because you are doing it by feel. Much like trying to explain how to balance a broom upright on your finger. Once you get the feel for it, it is dead simple. Explaining it is a bit complex.

You will need to get that feeling for each plane you use. They really have a bit of individuality. Some you tap gently, some you give a whack. They will also vary a bit with the weather as they adjust to the humidity.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12249 posts in 2695 days


#4 posted 1143 days ago

Basic mechanics are in this video…. David’s book is highly recommended for all plane users.

http://www.davidfinck.com/index.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dag4qNRdRRo

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1884 days


#5 posted 1142 days ago

After reading your question, I was formulating my answer—-until I read David Kirtley’s. I could have written that word for word, so I won’t bother.

You have to develop a touch through practice..

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View ChrisForthofer's profile

ChrisForthofer

150 posts in 1665 days


#6 posted 1142 days ago

I have David’s book and can vouch for it being a wealth of great information.

-- -Director of slipshod craftsmanship and attention deficit woodworking

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2686 days


#7 posted 1142 days ago

The videos answered the question.
Thanks for the links.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase