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Mysterious Mold appeared on stored wood

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Forum topic by Darlington posted 05-21-2018 01:43 PM 483 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Darlington

2 posts in 30 days


05-21-2018 01:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mold

My landlord asked me to stop storing my wood in the garage, as I was moving it I noticed this mold on a 12’ x 4×4 beam. (Picture link attached)

I’m a total noob at this – is this mold cause for concern, does anyone know how easily it spreads etc. Do I just need to dry the wood out and sand it off (with a mask of course), or should I completely dispose of it or treat it some other way? Does the presence of the mold in the stored wood indicate a possible wider problem in the property itself? If it indicates something like that I should tell my landlord.

Picture: https://photos.app.goo.gl/0mz9emjuL01p0G4m2

Thanks for any help/advice.

Tim


7 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

994 posts in 186 days


#1 posted 05-21-2018 02:55 PM

is the mold on just that one beam or on your whole stash ???
how much do you have stored in the garage ?
untreated wood on a concrete surface “may” cause condensation to accumulate
between the floor and the wood if not spaced/supported with sticks.

do the google search for: Mold Abatement

if it were me, I would just bleach it, wash it, and dry it. . . . but, that is just me.
then – store in a dry, well ventilated space. stagnant air and moisture is a recipe for mold.

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View LesB's profile

LesB

1748 posts in 3466 days


#2 posted 05-21-2018 05:11 PM

Mold is all about moisture. The wood was not dry so the mold had a place to grow. You can use stickers between each boards and also the floor to allow air to circulate. FYI, wood can absorb moisture from concrete so use a spacer or water proof barrier to separate them. It this wood is to be used in a house I would treat it with bleach (dilute household bleach is fine) then let it dry. No particular need to wash it the bleach will dissipate. i.e., I use bleach (sodium hypochlorite) in my spa all the time and it dissipates.

-- Les B, Oregon

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John Smith

994 posts in 186 days


#3 posted 05-21-2018 05:47 PM

this is a stack of Florida Cypress I have drying in my carport.
as you can see, there is a stick fastened to the wall with tapcons,
sticks under the first board on the floor, sticks between each board
and a vertical stick fastened with wire on the outside so the stack won’t fall over.
when I blow the carport out with the leaf blower, I also blow the dust off the stack.
depending on your storage area, this is how to keep mold to a minimum.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Darlington's profile

Darlington

2 posts in 30 days


#4 posted 05-22-2018 03:36 AM

Thank you all for your helpful advice. I will put these tips into action.

Tim

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

572 posts in 1493 days


#5 posted 05-22-2018 05:58 AM

Also just pointing out, it may not be legally correct for your landlord to dictate that you can’t store wood/lumber in the garage. I could see “Obscene” articles such as an animal corpse, barrels of motor oil, or another item that could cause damage to the premises being banned.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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John Smith

994 posts in 186 days


#6 posted 05-22-2018 11:17 AM

if I were the landlord, and I had a tenant that was growing black mold on the premises,
I would definitely take some kind of corrective action. and I think that it is ethical and prudent
to correct any potential safety or health issues before it gets out of control.
(but, I am not a sawdust lawer, sea lawyer, medical advisor or any other sorts).
with my knowledge of lumber, moisture, mold and mildew, I would “assist”
the tenant in correcting the issue through education – not eviction.
and help him store his material in the proper manner to preserve the wood and lessen any health issues.
and to answer your question: yes, black mold can be a severe health issue if inhaled or ingested into the body.

[and ~ this looks like a 2×4 – not a 4×4 beam]

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

585 posts in 1644 days


#7 posted 05-22-2018 05:02 PM

Just pointing out that even though it looks like a) mold and is b) black, does not mean it is stachybotrys (what people call “black mold”). It could be any of a zillion other mold species It might not even be a mold. It could be mildew.

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