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Process for spraying a lot of panels?

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Forum topic by mbs posted 05-20-2018 03:46 PM 419 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mbs

1657 posts in 3140 days


05-20-2018 03:46 PM

What process do you like when you have to spray front and back sides of cabinets, drawer fronts and doors? I’m using a tinted pre cat lacquer and the dry time is roughly 40 minutes. I’ll be spraying outside.

I have a lazy susan I can use but that only does one side at a time.

Hanging the parts seems smart but not sure how to hang them. Would I get a “hangar shadow”?

Ideas?

thanks,

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.


8 replies so far

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Rich

3880 posts in 790 days


#1 posted 05-20-2018 04:26 PM

I spray the interior surfaces before assembly. For doors and drawer fronts, I do the back side first, let it dry and then flip them over and do the front. I use carpet tack strips to keep the pieces elevated. The large tack count spreads out the weight of the piece and leaves marks that are less perceptible than using just four supports.

Dial your gun back. Several light coats will look better than a couple of heavier ones. Also, be sure to do a cross hatch pattern to ensure even coverage.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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John Smith

1482 posts in 363 days


#2 posted 05-20-2018 05:38 PM

if I had many items to spray, I would stretch out my 20 foot
aluminum extension ladder over two sawhorses and spray them.
when dry, turn them over for the same, if required. depending on the weather, of course.

if you wanted to hang the items, raise your ladder accordingly (and safely)
to the height needed to hang the items to get the job done.

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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jbay

2875 posts in 1099 days


#3 posted 05-20-2018 05:53 PM

I stain and seal and put the first coat of finish on the front side, let dry,
turn over stain, seal, sand, and finish the backs. let dry.

Then turn back to the fronts, final sand, put on the final coat of finish.

This method limits the amount of over spray going back onto the back side.

I hardly ever use tinted lacquer though, my method is for clear coats over stain.

On larger jobs, tinted lacquer is harder to control the consistency of the color, when using more than 1 coat.

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pintodeluxe

5798 posts in 3013 days


#4 posted 05-20-2018 06:13 PM

I hold the panel on an edge to spray the back side (but not the edges). Then lay it face-up on tack boards to spray the front. This way the panel is horizontal as the finish dries to avoid runs or sags in the finish.

Make the tack boards with small boards and sheetrock screws. Kind of like painters pyramids only better.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5697 posts in 2609 days


#5 posted 05-20-2018 06:46 PM


I use carpet tack strips to keep the pieces elevated. The large tack count spreads out the weight of the piece and leaves marks that are less perceptible than using just four supports.

- Rich

Was taught this trick by my Grandfather many years ago, works great.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Rich

3880 posts in 790 days


#6 posted 05-20-2018 07:25 PM

I use carpet tack strips to keep the pieces elevated. The large tack count spreads out the weight of the piece and leaves marks that are less perceptible than using just four supports.

- Rich

Was taught this trick by my Grandfather many years ago, works great.

- woodbutcherbynight

I don’t recall where I saw it first, but you can get a box of 100 four foot strips for about $20 at the home center. They tend to be a little bent, so I glue them to plywood to straighten them and make sure I have a flat platform to support my work. It also makes it easy to move pieces around so I can keep spraying at my station and have others drying.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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jbay

2875 posts in 1099 days


#7 posted 05-20-2018 07:33 PM

”so I can keep spraying at my station and have others drying”.

That’s what these are for. :)

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mbs

1657 posts in 3140 days


#8 posted 05-20-2018 08:18 PM

Thanks for sharing the great ideas.

I’ll go with the horizontal method to reduce the sag/run issues with hanging the panels. I need about 70 sq ft for all the parts so I think I’ll be spraying in one area then moving the panels to another area to dry.

Jbay – you probably do a lot of panels with that setup!

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

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