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Forum topic by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 05-20-2018 01:11 AM 616 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

820 posts in 1464 days


05-20-2018 01:11 AM

Last year I made a kitchen island and I used 2×4 SPF lumber to make up the top, the customer informed me that the back side of the tabletop has raised up alot and is not flush, when I gave them the kitchen island I informed them that I used butcher block conditioner on the top and to not add a stain as the stain is not food safe but they did anyway.

They live in a 3rd floor apartment and she said that it get very humid up there, I am not sure how to fix this table top. I am thinking of remaking the top using thinner stock 1x material.

Has anyone had this problem in the past ??? what did you do to remedy the bow. I made this for a friend and they did pay me for it but the top was made on the cheap using 2×4’s because they couldn’t afford anything else.

If i had a planer I would just take back to the shop and plane the lumber down , but I dont.

Not sure what to do???

Thanks
Ed

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”


13 replies so far

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

863 posts in 560 days


#1 posted 05-20-2018 01:15 AM

do you have a hand plane?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

820 posts in 1464 days


#2 posted 05-20-2018 01:17 AM



do you have a hand plane?

- BlasterStumps


No

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

273 posts in 806 days


#3 posted 05-20-2018 01:37 AM

How did you get the stock flat/parallel initially? Was the lumber good and dry?

If you have a router you could build a sled

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5741 posts in 2934 days


#4 posted 05-20-2018 02:12 AM

SPF lumber is very different from furniture grade hardwood. Many times it is finish milled before it is dried. With hardwood lumber it’s rough milled, air dried, then kiln dried Finally it is jointed flat, planed parallel, and ripped to width. Skip any of these steps and things go awry.

My own feeling is that wooden countertops are never really a good plan. It’s kind of asking for a problem. 2×4 lumber would be especially prone to warping. If the top is attached to the cabinet in a manner that doesn’t allow wood movement then the problem would be magnified.

Good luck with the issue you are having. I understand about having to do what the customer asks.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View joey502's profile

joey502

544 posts in 1639 days


#5 posted 05-20-2018 02:30 AM

My guess would be the problem was from the construction lumber drying out not the humidiy in the room.

Do you have any pictures of it’s current state? Are the 2×4s edge glued or face glued?

You may be able to kerf it and pull it back down, depending on how bad it twisted.

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

820 posts in 1464 days


#6 posted 05-20-2018 02:49 AM



My guess would be the problem was from the construction lumber drying out not the humidiy in the room.

Do you have any pictures of it s current state? Are the 2×4s edge glued or face glued?

You may be able to kerf it and pull it back down, depending on how bad it twisted.

- joey502


Sorry no pics, edge glued.. I’m thinking of remaking the top but using 1×12” and lay 2 boards side my side and adding biscuit joints

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

820 posts in 1464 days


#7 posted 05-20-2018 02:51 AM



How did you get the stock flat/parallel initially? Was the lumber good and dry?

If you have a router you could build a sled

- avsmusic1


They were good and flat and I purchased kiln dried 2×4.. I do have a router but would rather remake

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1664 posts in 1919 days


#8 posted 05-20-2018 03:26 AM

2×4 construction lumber is often from small baby trees. That’s why many of the boards in a lift will have the pith or center of the tree.
It’s good for framing a wall since it will be easy to drive nails into.And its strength is very predictable. I’ve also made plenty of spruce and fir 2×4 gates.
I would be surprised if it didn’t warp.

-- Aj

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12341 posts in 2501 days


#9 posted 05-20-2018 03:40 AM

Construction lumber is only partially dried, not like hardwood lumber. You really need to let it set in your shop for a while to lose additional moisture, the longer the better—months at a minimum. If the top is not finished top and bottom, it can lead to bowing or cupping. You might be able to kerf the bottom and straighten the top, then refinish. And get yourself a decent handplane, they are one of the most important tools for a woodworker.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

808 posts in 1340 days


#10 posted 05-20-2018 05:45 PM

They were good and flat and I purchased kiln dried 2×4..

- EdsCustomWoodCrafts

would that be kiln dried 2 by 4 construction lumber from the lumber yard? if so, the MC is still quite high in construction lumber even though it says kiln dried. ive checked 2 by 4’s and have seen up to 17% MC.its kiln dried to a MC that is acceptable in construction but not furniture building.

ive built over 100 homes. many times there would be a bunk of 2 by 4’s ( and even 2 by 6,8,10, and 12’s) with straight ones on the top. a few hours in the sun and them nice striaght 2 by 4’s would be all whacked.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1766 posts in 2597 days


#11 posted 05-20-2018 11:50 PM

2×4 SPF construction lumber is only dried to about 19% moisture content. It is not suitable for inside furniture. Your problem was a moisture content problem.

This is a common problem as “kiln dried” construction lumber does not mean the same as “kiln dried furniture grade hardwood”.

You can “kiln dry” lumber to any moisture content that you want.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View BenjaminNY's profile

BenjaminNY

131 posts in 1523 days


#12 posted 05-21-2018 10:14 AM

I’d be amazed if edge glued 2×4’s did not warp. Don’t rebuild it the same way, it will just happen again.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2399 posts in 1508 days


#13 posted 05-21-2018 01:24 PM

You didn’t say how the island top is attached to its base. Just a like a table top, you need to allow for wood movement. If you just drove screws in from the bottom and/or glued it down to the base for example, it will probably warp or split eventually no matter what the initial or eventual moisture content was or is.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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