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Sanding Longleaf Heart Pine

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Forum topic by enazle posted 05-19-2018 02:11 PM 506 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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enazle

66 posts in 125 days


05-19-2018 02:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m in the process of reclaiming some 100 year old longleaf pine. I’m struggling to sand the material using my Woodtek Dual Drum sander. I started off using the standard Aluminum Oxide belts I have always used and quickly found I have myself into more than I bargained for. I bought a roll of Zirconia Alumina 60 grit and while better than the AO, it’s not that much better. SO here is my question, does anyone have any tips or tricks to sanding heart pine? I am taking off about .01 per drum per pass. I have tried using dry spray-on anti-adhesion that helps a little. A guy that work in is families lumber yard said they used Pan cooking spray? I know it sounds crazy, but I just thought I would through it out there to see if anyone else had heard such a thing?


10 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#1 posted 05-19-2018 03:25 PM

I have never heard of using a non-stick spray such as “Pam”.
for small projects, I would use the cabinet scraper vs sanding.
some heart pine lumber has such a high percentage of pitch which will clog any sandpaper.
you can try Pam if you want – come back with the results.
(read the ingredients on the can to see what the base ingredient is:
like olive oil, canola, palm, soy bean extracts, for instance).

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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GrantA

401 posts in 1524 days


#2 posted 05-19-2018 03:59 PM

It doesn’t matter what you do your drum is gonna get clogged in short order. I work with antique heart pine a good bit and have been happy with 80-120-220 on the orbital sander, changing paper as it gets pitch buildup.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5048 posts in 4077 days


#3 posted 05-19-2018 11:12 PM

True “heart” pine is gonna have a BUNCH of rosin/pitch in it. That, coupled with heat from the sander, is gonna generate a lot of heat which will cause the drum paper to gum up.

-- bill@magraphics.us

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ocean

99 posts in 950 days


#4 posted 05-20-2018 01:09 AM

Like others have said you are going to run into a lot of rosin/pitch. I have a similar problem with a pine that only grew in the Keys and the Bahamas. It is locally called Dade County pine. In particular Pinus elliottii var. densa or P. caribaea If you thing you long leaf pine is bad just give this pine a try and you will give up fast. I have found that if you having to sand a lot you may be better to use a planer or sand with finer grits (which means more sanding time) 100 as the roughest and work up in grit. I usually start with 120/150. To much pressure and sanding in one spot will only bring out the sap and gum up your paper. Go slow and steady with a light touch. Good luck but if you persist you will love the finished product.

-- Bob, FL Keys

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GrantA

401 posts in 1524 days


#5 posted 05-20-2018 01:17 AM

I just made this coat rack for my mom (mothers day) and lemme tell ya – I used a keyhole bit in the plunge router for mounting slots, slots are about 1/2” deep and maybe 3” long. This board was kiln dried. I plunged the bit, made the groove and shut it off, thinking I’d pull it back through the slot without it running. Hah!! It laughed at me. Had to carefully remove under power then I had to use a pick to get the resulting goo out of the slot.
Have fun!

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Blindhog

70 posts in 1165 days


#6 posted 05-20-2018 01:31 PM

I really enjoy working with longleaf pine for the finished product but sanding it is definitely problematic. I got some wood that came off beams out of a Georgia textile mill built in the 1880s and I love how the wood looks finished.

Recently finished desk using antique pine…............

When I use my Supermax drum sander to flatten resawn panels it gums up fast even using a rubber cleaning stick after each pass. Resin content is the culprit and I haven’t found any way to prevent it. As previously stated, using a planer and then ROS minimizes the clogged belts.
I guess it’s just the price to pay if you use power tools to work the wood. Scraping would avoid the clogging but it’s a LOT more work.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View enazle's profile

enazle

66 posts in 125 days


#7 posted 05-21-2018 12:11 PM

You guys are not going to believe this but the spray “Pam” works! Now granted I don’t know what other problems may occur as a result from using this stuff? It’s messy and coats everything with overspray, but the results are pretty dramatic. To test the method, I coated the back drum with anti-adhesion spray and the front drum with the Pam. My thinking was if this turns out to be a total disaster the back drum would clean it up. I used a piece scrap first and then ran about 15 boards through the machine. I lift the lid and found the back drum totally loaded up and the front drum was almost pristeen hardly any pitch on it. I took a picture and will load it when I am in front of my pc.

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GrantA

401 posts in 1524 days


#8 posted 05-21-2018 03:08 PM

Interesting. Did you use the butter flavored Pam? Haha
If that works you may want to think about different oils. Pam is canola which will go rancid. You could use a spray mister and mineral oil for the same effect minus turning rancid. Just finish it with an oil and it should be good to go

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enazle

66 posts in 125 days


#9 posted 05-21-2018 04:51 PM



Interesting. Did you use the butter flavored Pam? Haha
If that works you may want to think about different oils. Pam is canola which will go rancid. You could use a spray mister and mineral oil for the same effect minus turning rancid. Just finish it with an oil and it should be good to go

- GrantA

That is my thoughts exactly, I already ordered a bottle of spray Mineral Oil on Amazon. I think I can load a picture now:

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1833 posts in 2106 days


#10 posted 05-21-2018 07:27 PM

I would think any garden variety spray bottle could be used with garden variety mineral oil using ms to thin enough to spray? Bound to be cheaper and more available.

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