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Round table beveled edge

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Forum topic by willhime posted 05-17-2018 03:22 PM 510 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willhime

122 posts in 1682 days


05-17-2018 03:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question resource tip trick pine finishing milling joining shaping sanding

I’m making a 58” diameter round table. I want the edge to be slightly beveled on top. The closest video I could find to get the look I’m going for is by Toth who makes a huge jig that slides over the table saw fence with a center point dowel to rotate the surface through the blade. The problem is that the surface is slightly bowed until I attach the base that has stretchers the surface will be fastened to bending it back flush. Is there a different or easier way to achieve the beveled edge than making a huge Ferris wheel jig ?

-- Burn your fire for no witness


7 replies so far

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jmartel

8154 posts in 2293 days


#1 posted 05-17-2018 03:32 PM

Router jig. Make an angled carriage that rides on a center point trammel arm. You spin it around, then move the router up the slope a bit, spin it around, etc.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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woodytoolmaker

2 posts in 273 days


#2 posted 05-17-2018 04:15 PM

I did the same thing on a maple table top. It had an ogee cut around the diameter. The sharp corner cut of the ogee off set would get food crammed in (thanks to 4 young daughters). I saw an article in Fine Wood Working by Frank Klaus. He had done this to his kitchen table and talked about how comfortable it is to rest your arm against. So I took a pencil in hand, extended it about 2 1/2 inches and used the fatty part of my palm as a fence. I marked the table top for the radius I wanted then I did the same for the depth (about 1/2 “) I then sharpened up my grandfathers #5 plane and proceeded to plane the bevel on. it took about an hour. I then used my palm sander and smoothed it up and sanded down the rest of the table top. then put about 3 coats of varnish on it. it looks as good today as it did when I finished it some 15 years ago. Hope this helps

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woodytoolmaker

2 posts in 273 days


#3 posted 05-17-2018 04:19 PM

If you want to use a power tool, get a straight bevel door panel cutter in your router and use it with a guide bushing.

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Woodknack

12369 posts in 2523 days


#4 posted 05-17-2018 05:31 PM

Mark a line on top and the side to define the bevel and hand plane to the line. It will take less time than building a power tool jig.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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LittleShaver

394 posts in 762 days


#5 posted 05-17-2018 05:42 PM

Looks like you top is made from construction lumber. Hand Plane (even if you leave some tool marks) would be the quick and easy way to go.

-- Sawdust Maker

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AandCstyle

3163 posts in 2400 days


#6 posted 05-17-2018 11:11 PM

Will, I used a bearing guided router bit like this one and ran around the table in about 2 minutes. Nothing could be any easier. HTH

-- Art

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jbay

2665 posts in 1042 days


#7 posted 05-18-2018 12:01 AM


Will, I used a bearing guided router bit like this one and ran around the table in about 2 minutes. Nothing could be any easier. HTH

- AandCstyle

I agree,
you can also get these bits in a 15 degree if 30 is too much.

How good are you with a belt sander?
Good enough to rough out the shape, then dial it in with a sanding block?
Just draw the line around the top inset about 3/4” then hold the sander at the same angle as you sand to the line, moving the sander side to side.

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