LumberJocks

Aesthetics of this table design?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by JohnMcClure posted 05-16-2018 08:41 PM 425 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

276 posts in 817 days


05-16-2018 08:41 PM

I want to make a tall-ish, small-ish side table to sit next to my recliner. I have never made something with fine, sweeping lines like this before, so I’m just free-handing the shape and hoping it looks right. What do you think? Is there a rule of thumb for sweeping/tapered legs like this? I hope the drawing captures what I’m going for.
This will be very light weight, but about 32” tall and 14”x14” on the top. think this will be stable? I could eliminate the skirt, and turn it into a brace about 1/3 of the way down the leg… or I could add such a brace, while retaining the skirt…

Thanks!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail


7 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

167 posts in 707 days


#1 posted 05-16-2018 08:46 PM

I think it looks nice. I would not eliminate the skirt and would add a cross as a brace further down. A second box matching the skirt would also work, but I think it would visually take away from the sleekness of the legs.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

276 posts in 817 days


#2 posted 05-16-2018 08:52 PM

A cross, now that’s a great idea. And will be a real challenge too, for me… would that be a lap joint to form the cross, then M&T into the legs?

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3825 days


#3 posted 05-16-2018 09:16 PM

Apron should be at least 2.5” wide if you’re
using wood-to-wood joinery to attach the
legs. This is a personal rule of thumb for
me but it’s generally sensible and going
thinner is often courting trouble.

Fair curves can be drawn by making a simple
wooden bow about a yard long with a thing
you spin in the middle to tension it to the
curve you want.
https://youtu.be/snsmS8D1sCc

A four-way cross brace lapped at the center
is doable, but it’s simpler and sometimes
aesthetically acceptable to make two overlapping
braces. Assembling the tops of the legs
to the apron may be simpler this way, depending
on how you’re doing the apron joinery. With
a four way brace I think you’d have to assemble
the legs around the brace first and then you’d
have to use a joint for the aprons that would
be possible to assemble with the leg relationship
already fixed.

I can’t guarantee the 2 way braces will get you
out of this assembly problem, but they might.
I haven’t thought it through rigorously enough
to say for sure.

Another approach is to eliminate the apron,
glue the legs up with the four way brace and
attach the top with through tenons on the
ends of the legs. These can be tricky to cut
so they look good on the exposed ends though.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

276 posts in 817 days


#4 posted 05-16-2018 10:22 PM

Thank you Loren.
I have a yardstick laying idly by that will do perfectly – great suggestion.
Regarding overlapping braces as you mentioned, would there be any glued contact between the two braces at all?

Penetrating the legs through the table top sounds gorgeous, but may be beyond my expertise just now. I will think about it!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3170 posts in 2434 days


#5 posted 05-16-2018 10:37 PM

John, when you are selecting the stock for the legs, try to pick some where the grain is bending similarly to the curve in your design. I realize that this is a light weight table, but why take chances? FWIW

-- Art

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

276 posts in 817 days


#6 posted 05-16-2018 11:28 PM

Thanks Art,
As a matter of fact this was inspired by some cherry boards I have with grain curving exactly the way my legs are drawn!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3825 days


#7 posted 05-16-2018 11:42 PM

You can glue them, nail them or leave them
alone.

Those diagonal legs are kind of an advanced
joinery thing, aside from the braces. Cutting
slots with a biscuit joiner and then widening
the slots so you can slip the splines in from
above is one way to put it together. You’d need
cauls of some sort to clamp the joints tight.

If you have a biscuit jointer or Domino machine
there’s another way I can think of to put it
together as well. Glue up one set of legs
with the brace, then glue a third leg on with
the aprons and the other brace glued to it.
After that, glue the fourth leg on with the other
two aprons.

It can be done with a doweling jig that will
do 45 degree angles too, or a Shopsmith.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com