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Electric Hand Planer

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Forum topic by JCamp posted 05-15-2018 12:54 PM 559 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JCamp

726 posts in 605 days


05-15-2018 12:54 PM

I believe a electric hand planer is next on my “to buy” list. My reasoning is that I can quickly use it to knock down the high spots prior to running boards through my bigger Dewalt planer.
I’ve been looking for a while and I believe I’ve narrowed it down to 4.
1- porter cable 6amp $70
2- black and decker 5.2 amp $64
3- harbor freight 7.5 amp $60
4- harbor freight 5.5 amp $38
All are 2 blade and 3.25 inches wide.
I know there are probably some better ones but I currently don’t think that I’ll use it enough to spend over a $100 on it.
Any thought or suggestions?
And yes I do have hand planes but since I moved last fall my “work bench” is my tablesaw so it would b hard to use them

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might


15 replies so far

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Jeff

444 posts in 3249 days


#1 posted 05-15-2018 12:59 PM

I have a Hitachi branded power plane. The only use it ever got was to plane down the edge of a door to make it fit. It is very difficult to control over a wider surface. I’ve used my tablesaw as a work surface. It’s easy to clamp items down to prevent moving.

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rwe2156

3003 posts in 1535 days


#2 posted 05-15-2018 02:29 PM



I believe a electric hand planer is next on my “to buy” list. My reasoning is that I can quickly use it to knock down the high spots prior to running boards through my bigger Dewalt planer.

What kind of wood are you working with? I’ve never had to do that if I get a board with unevenness, I just run it thru the planer a few times until its planed off.

I have a Bosch collecting dust somewhere. Seems to work pretty well.

I would definitely take a look at Ryobi. $80.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1130 posts in 217 days


#3 posted 05-15-2018 02:41 PM

having the choice of directing the chips is a big plus.
I don’t know if the late models have an “adjustable” chip deflector, but something to consider.
I like the idea that I can direct the chips to one side or the other.
I have had this old vintage Skil hand plane for 40 years and it has a simple deflector.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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RobHannon

122 posts in 585 days


#4 posted 05-15-2018 02:47 PM

I have an old Ryobi (when they were blue) that was great for adjusting doors, but not what I would call a versatile tool. A belt sander with a coarse belt is what I turn to for quick removal of high spots.

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CharlesA

3332 posts in 1852 days


#5 posted 05-15-2018 02:55 PM

I bought a makita for a specific job and it was fabulous. I haven’t used it since then, but I will have no hesitancy if the need arises. It can produce a mountain of chips.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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waho6o9

8242 posts in 2631 days


#6 posted 05-15-2018 03:09 PM

Just for the heck of it

70 + 64 + 60 + 38 = 232. Divided by four = 58

So the 60.00 7.5 amp Harbor Freight planer gets my vote.

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JCamp

726 posts in 605 days


#7 posted 05-15-2018 03:54 PM

Thanks for the advice so far. I’ll take a look at the Ryobi.
I should hav said that I’m mostly working with maple, ash and white/red oak at this point. Some of the boards are bowed a good bit. Seems to take forever getting them flat with only the big planer. I figured the hand planer would do fast work and then use the big one at the end. I do also have hand held belt sander but that seems like it would take a while too.
I had considered just buying the cheaper HF one then seeing how much I used it. If I used it a lot and it crapped out I could go get a nicer one at that point

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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PPK

1080 posts in 864 days


#8 posted 05-15-2018 04:31 PM

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BurlyBob

5642 posts in 2320 days


#9 posted 05-15-2018 05:45 PM

I bought a Makita several years ago. Nothing really wrong with the tool. It works just fine. I still consider it a waste of money. In the 10 years since, I’ve used it once, that first time. All it does is sit in a box under my bench.

View torus's profile

torus

114 posts in 467 days


#10 posted 05-15-2018 05:53 PM

WEN 6528 3.8-Amp Electric Hand Planer
https://www.amazon.com/WEN-6530-Electric-Planer-4-Inch/dp/B079FBDPF4

3 sizes from $30 to $50. I use $30 version to flatten one side of firewood logs before ripping them on
the table saw.

Works great and fun to use.

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2873 posts in 2569 days


#11 posted 05-15-2018 05:59 PM

Back in 1999-2000, when I was restoring a huge farmhouse, I found myself needing one, so I went for the HF model at the time.
It even came in Hitachi green.
Came with an extra set of blades and a funky little do-dad that was used to align the blades when putting them in. Used it for a lot of door edging. Worked OK, save it will dig in on open planks. Be careful! Still runs well today, although I don’t use it much at all.
I’d vote for the $60 Harbor Freight – looks a lot like my old HF save it is now that famous Chicago Electric maroon and black.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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ralbuck

4709 posts in 2321 days


#12 posted 05-15-2018 10:33 PM

As I have had several different brands of electric tools over many decades of tool buying; I have NEVER been disappointed with Bosch anything! i cannot say the same about any of the rest.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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mel52

442 posts in 319 days


#13 posted 05-16-2018 01:19 AM

I have a WEN that I ordered from HD, that I like. It also has a switch that deflects chips to either side. Wasn’t that expensive either.

-- MEL, Kansas

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woodbutcherbynight

5274 posts in 2463 days


#14 posted 05-16-2018 02:48 AM



T
I had considered just buying the cheaper HF one then seeing how much I used it. If I used it a lot and it crapped out I could go get a nicer one at that point

- JCamp

I have used this method a few times. As you said if you use it and like it you can always get a upgrade. Or if it is not what you thought it would be you still have a quick planer for odd jobs, like doors.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3003 posts in 1535 days


#15 posted 05-16-2018 02:09 PM


Thanks for the advice so far. I’ll take a look at the Ryobi.
I should hav said that I’m mostly working with maple, ash and white/red oak at this point. Some of the boards are bowed a good bit. Seems to take forever getting them flat with only the big planer. I figured the hand planer would do fast work and then use the big one at the end. I do also have hand held belt sander but that seems like it would take a while too.
I had considered just buying the cheaper HF one then seeing how much I used it. If I used it a lot and it crapped out I could go get a nicer one at that point

- JCamp

Might be appropriate to make sure the terminology is correct.

A bow is curved along the flat length of a board.
A cup is across the width.
A warp is along the edge.

Assuming a jointer isn’t an option, there are various type of jigs and sleds you can use in your planer to remove the cup.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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