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Forum topic by PhillipRCW posted 05-09-2018 04:04 PM 1623 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PhillipRCW

497 posts in 1319 days


05-09-2018 04:04 PM

I’m looking at using acrylic and either walnut or oak for a few wood turning pieces. Has anyone ever joined them together? I’ve googled and found a pretty wide range of methods, but nothing that says for sure it will work. I’m looking at doing a lamp with alternating layers to filter the light, as well as a few bowls with layers.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.


9 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

2931 posts in 2475 days


#1 posted 05-09-2018 04:34 PM

The problem, as I see it, is that you have two different materials that will expand and contract at different rates.

In order to make it work, you need an adhesive that is NOT rigid and can flex with the changes but stay firmly attached. I’m thinking Silcone RTV type stuff, though, I’m not sure I would recommend this on a turning. (Will RTV even stick to acrylic?)

You could also consider mechanical fasteners in addition to the adhesive.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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oldnovice

6947 posts in 3422 days


#2 posted 05-09-2018 07:11 PM

I agree with DS above!
My last project was nearly 100% Plexiglas (about 30 sqft of 1/4” cast Plexiglas, not cheap) that is why it’s not posted on Lumberjocks.
If possible in your design, try letting the Plexiglas float inside/next to the wood.

I have not tried this or seen any information that makes me think that using a clear casting resin may/may not work as it does not get as hard as acrylic. Then, on the other hand, casting resin is not as clear as acrylic.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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PhillipRCW

497 posts in 1319 days


#3 posted 05-09-2018 07:38 PM

I am looking at doing a few projects using acrylic sheets in furniture builds as well, so the company is looking at giving me better pricing. One of the projects will be a bookcase with acrylic shelves that are illuminated by embedded LED strips along the back. I’ll have to post some sketches later on.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2044 posts in 2998 days


#4 posted 05-10-2018 06:49 AM

The two are mixed every day. Go look at jewelry and you’ll see many examples.

Just rough up the plastic to give some bite and go for it. I use epoxy. It holds and has some give.

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

210 posts in 1528 days


#5 posted 05-10-2018 11:16 AM

I’ve joined cherry and corian, which is a plastic, using epoxy and not had any issues. How big are the pieces of walnut you will be using? Since my pieces have been small, wood movement has not been a problem. You may be in the same situation.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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PhillipRCW

497 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 05-10-2018 12:40 PM

Thanks Kelly and Gwilki, these will be for lamps and small bowls, so nothing giant. I had read somewhere that epoxy wouldn’t bond to the acrylic very well. Don’t know why I hadn’t thought of roughing up the surface first.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

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Porchfish

832 posts in 2587 days


#7 posted 05-10-2018 01:05 PM

I have poured both Epoxy and Urethane hybrid bowl blanks and not had the problems you envision. There are systems out there using a Urethane called “cactus juice” that you use first in a vacuum pot to force the molecules of resin into the wood to force out the H2O and air bubbles, this pressure treated blank must then be oven baked @ around 250 degrees (mol) in a foil wrap for a time from 4 hours to overnight (depending on the wood species and size) Then the preserved wood blank can be cooled down and used with epoxies or urethanes in a mold of your making which you place in a Pressure Pot to prevent the formation of bubbles ( those damned bubbles again) after 24 hours you have a stabilized, preserved blank ready for lathe turning. You can also take your chances by foregoing the preservation process and make sure the wood you select is NOT green or harvested in the last 6 months. In this case you make a mold and add the chosen medium (epoxy or urethanes) with your wood. devise a method to keep the wood you use from rising to the surface when you pour your colored (or plain) medium. Use a heat gun to burst and force up bubbles to the surface where they will either break or you can puncture the bigger ones with a pin. Now let the whole mess cure according to package directions….then de-mold and turn on your lathe. Experiment, experiment, experiment. Good luck P.S. there are a myriad films on YouTube showing the processes I have outlined(picture=1k words ? mol).

-- The pig caught under the fence is always the one doing all the squealing !

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PhillipRCW

497 posts in 1319 days


#8 posted 05-10-2018 01:34 PM



I have poured both Epoxy and Urethane hybrid bowl blanks and not had the problems you envision. There are systems out there using a Urethane called “cactus juice” that you use first in a vacuum pot to force the molecules of resin into the wood to force out the H2O and air bubbles, this pressure treated blank must then be oven baked @ around 250 degrees (mol) in a foil wrap for a time from 4 hours to overnight (depending on the wood species and size) Then the preserved wood blank can be cooled down and used with epoxies or urethanes in a mold of your making which you place in a Pressure Pot to prevent the formation of bubbles ( those damned bubbles again) after 24 hours you have a stabilized, preserved blank ready for lathe turning. You can also take your chances by foregoing the preservation process and make sure the wood you select is NOT green or harvested in the last 6 months. In this case you make a mold and add the chosen medium (epoxy or urethanes) with your wood. devise a method to keep the wood you use from rising to the surface when you pour your colored (or plain) medium. Use a heat gun to burst and force up bubbles to the surface where they will either break or you can puncture the bigger ones with a pin. Now let the whole mess cure according to package directions….then de-mold and turn on your lathe. Experiment, experiment, experiment. Good luck P.S. there are a myriad films on YouTube showing the processes I have outlined(picture=1k words ? mol).

- Porchfish

I’m looking at using acrylic sheets. Don’t have the pressure pot and all the extra play toys for casting currently.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

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LesB

1775 posts in 3497 days


#9 posted 05-10-2018 04:06 PM

Urethane glue would be what I would choose. It bonds to most things and has some flexibility. It needs moisture to set up so dampen one of the surfaces and clamp firmly because it wants to expand as it cures.

-- Les B, Oregon

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