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Help with particular shelving construction

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Forum topic by PatronZ posted 05-08-2018 09:27 PM 304 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PatronZ

2 posts in 572 days


05-08-2018 09:27 PM

I’m looking to build this type of shelving along one wall in my basement but am having trouble deciding how they should be constructed. Has anyone built these shelves before? Looking for tips on contruction behind the painted wall. All I can come up with is rectangular boxes laid flat between shelf boxes. Anyone have a better way to tackle this?


9 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

862 posts in 156 days


#1 posted 05-09-2018 12:54 PM

you have to do some framing and drywall work first that will have
the recessed cavities that the natural wood boxes will slide into.
it would help a lot to have some framing and drywall experience to start with.
this could be a challenging project for a novice – but very doable.
[drywall covers a LOT of framing errors].

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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LesB

1720 posts in 3436 days


#2 posted 05-09-2018 03:38 PM

From the image it looks like shelf boxes with a recessed face frame structure separating them. What the structure is behind the face framing is the mystery.
There could be several ways the internal support structure for the shelf boxes is put together. Possibly a cabinet made with inexpensive plywood and some sort of supports for the back end of the shelf boxes or the shelf boxes could be fastened to the back of the cabinet. There could also just be 2×4 framing as support for the boxes and face frame.

-- Les B, Oregon

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ScottM

639 posts in 2140 days


#3 posted 05-09-2018 03:47 PM

There are a lot of things to take into consideration for something like this. That looks to be a lot of framing support removed….

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Kelly

2025 posts in 2937 days


#4 posted 05-10-2018 03:35 PM

The gray could be drywall or it could be smooth plywood.

The plywood could be as thin as 1/8”, as long as it sat over (covered) 2x or on end 3/4” ply to support the shelves and the weight of books, when full. The on edge plywood would work like standard shelf stiffners.

If you clear coated the inset portions before painting the surrounding areas, painting (cutting in) around them would be a breeze, since mistakes could be wiped off easily, before you took another stab at it.

The shelves may just be plywood with banding on the edge, to reduce problems associated with solid boards. That would be my choice.

In the end, this is a fairly simple project, if you take it a step at a time.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10373 posts in 3641 days


#5 posted 05-10-2018 03:51 PM

For it to look flush and perfect and modern
like in the picture there’s going to be some
precise work involved.

Maybe there’s a way to get those perfect edges
with drywall. That would be cheap and easy to
work with. Perhaps with meticulous taping,
mudding, sanding and painting you can get the
background right up flush with the wood boxes.

Usually for something like this I would want to
use a mitered molding to hide the drywall sins.

Clients sometimes don’t understand why the
modern clean look with no moldings can get so
expensive. This is why.

View Rick's profile

Rick

9591 posts in 3026 days


#6 posted 05-10-2018 03:54 PM



From the image it looks like shelf boxes with a recessed face frame structure separating them. What the structure is behind the face framing is the mystery.
There could be several ways the internal support structure for the shelf boxes is put together. Possibly a cabinet made with inexpensive plywood and some sort of supports for the back end of the shelf boxes or the shelf boxes could be fastened to the back of the cabinet. There could also just be 2×4 framing as support for the boxes and face frame.

- LesB

That sounds about right. The Key is…..”What the structure is behind the face framing is the mystery. ” Not a big deal. I’m sure you can figure it all out!

Regards: Rick

-- LIFE is what happens when you're planning on doing Other Things!

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LesB

1720 posts in 3436 days


#7 posted 05-10-2018 03:59 PM

changed my mind on further comments

-- Les B, Oregon

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10373 posts in 3641 days


#8 posted 05-10-2018 04:07 PM

There’s some figure on the edging that suggests
it’s solid wood, not strip banding. Normally
when I use solid wood edging on ply I glue
it on oversized and the flush trim both edges.

A way to approach this is to use 1/2” veneered
ply for the boxes with reinforcement underneath
as needed. Install the boxes and nail them in
a little proud, then trim the ply off flush to the
painted background and apply mitered edging
with a pin nailer in place so it overlaps the gap
between the box and the background by 1/4”.
Flush trim the inside only.

Making the edging overlap could be approached
in the shop as well and the boxes slid into the
holes, but the cavity they are going into needs
to have a floor that’s level and square to the
face of the background. If you can work from
the back of the piece you can put shims in as
you go, but going in from the front that will
be more awkward.

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PatronZ

2 posts in 572 days


#9 posted 05-10-2018 05:39 PM

I appreciate all the comments and suggestions. I’m going to take a crack at it using Baltic Birch as the shelving as I really like the look of it’s exposed edge. And for the wall, I agree that it needs to be super precise to achieve the modern look. I feel like for an amateur like me drywall would be a disaster. I agree with Kelly that a thin 1/8 ply, or prob better 1/4 would be the way to go to get it nice and tight. And I also like the suggestion of clear coating the shelving first so any mistakes with the paint could be wiped off. I’ll post progress pics once I start so interested parties can watch me fumble my way through it. I plan to start this project right after I trim the windows (also being done with Baltic Birch). I’ve built some furniture and random art pieces before, but I have a feeling I’ll learn more finishing my basement than with all other projects combined

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