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Ridgid TS3650 and riving knive?

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Forum topic by EvilNuff posted 05-31-2011 03:24 AM 13994 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EvilNuff

60 posts in 2088 days


05-31-2011 03:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw question

I’m in the market for a table saw and have been looking at the Ridgid R4512. I found a used TS3650 for $250 which as best as I can determine is a very similar model just without a riving knife. I was wondering if there is a reasonable way to add a riving knife to it? I haven’t found a good solution via google so any other opinions would be welcomed.


10 replies so far

View WinterSun's profile

WinterSun

163 posts in 2070 days


#1 posted 05-31-2011 03:34 AM

As far as I know, there’s no retrofit riving knife for that saw. Bob Ross makes the BORK retrofit riving knife (http://www.theborkstore.com) but it’s not compatible with the Ridgid saws at this time. Last I heard, Bob had torn down an old Craftsman saw (which is a very similar design to the TS3650 and other older Ridgid saws) in order to develop a BORK for them, but apparently it’s not ready to go yet.

-- Rory // Milwaukee, WI

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

372 posts in 2065 days


#2 posted 05-31-2011 04:04 AM

I own a 3650, it is a fine saw, and (at least at retail) comes with a splitter that does tilt with the blade. However it is no riving knife.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#3 posted 05-31-2011 04:19 AM

The Ridgid TS3650 and R4512 are very different saws with different designs and are manufactured by different companies. The R4512 is more of a hybrid saw with an inboard motor…it’s made by Dayton and is very similar to the current Craftsman 21833. The 3650 is an older style contractor saw with an outboard motor…it’s made by TTI/Ryobi and is a descendent of the older Emerson made Ridgid contractor saws – TS2412, TS2424, and TS3612, which are descendents of the Emerson made Craftsman contractor saws. I’ve never seen a riving knife available for the 3650, or any of it’s relatives. The last I knew Bob Ross didn’t think that a retrofit riving knife like the BORK was feasible for the design of the 3650 type saws.

A good splitter essentially does the same job as a riving knife, but a riving knife is a more elegant design….the single biggest advantage of the riving knife is that it’s less intrusive so is more likely to be installed so it can do it’s job. There are good aftermarket splitters like the Shark Guard and Microjig splitters that can be used on the TS3650 style saws.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Brian Strothcamp's profile

Brian Strothcamp

111 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 12-19-2011 02:54 AM

I just seen a riving knife on this saw!!!

I am a new 3650 owner and have been researching this for a while. I emailed the guy hoping to get a response. Maybe he is a member here?

Look at the 6th pick down on the left. If anyone knows where to get this gem please let me know!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30858907@N08/

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#5 posted 12-19-2011 03:25 AM

I think what you saw is an aftermarket fixed Biesemeyer splitter, not a riving knife. Looks like a nice setup though…

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Brian Strothcamp

111 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 12-19-2011 03:30 AM

I would settle for that though… I see that it cant go down because the slot wont allow, so its not perfect but I would assume it does tilt. I was trying to figure out the silver sticker on the plexi… looks like it all may be provided by the same manufacturer.

EDIT: Just looked up the Biesemeyer… you nailed it. Thanks!

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19172 posts in 2135 days


#7 posted 12-19-2011 07:38 AM

Since I am sure I’m not the only one, I’ll ask….

What is the difference between a “splitter” and a “riving knife”?

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#8 posted 12-19-2011 01:43 PM

Both essentially do the same job, but a riving knife raises, lowers, and tilts with the blade, and the height can usually be adjusted relative to the top of the blade. Some splitter tilts, some are fixed, but none raise and lower with the blade, meaning they can’t be used for thru-cuts. One of the biggest advantages of a riving knife is that they can be left on for thru-cuts, so they’re more likely to be in place to do their job. A riving knife also tends to sit in closer proximity to the back of the blade, but some of the better splitters get pretty close too.

Traditional splitters:

Riving knives:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View RibsBrisket4me's profile

RibsBrisket4me

1526 posts in 1966 days


#9 posted 12-19-2011 03:18 PM

Again I agree with what Knotscot says. For a contractor type saw ( I have a Craftsman Emerson Era Contr Saw). I use the stock guard/spitter, but also have a Microjig set up.

The Shark Guard is also a VERY good option and a quality upgrade to any contr saw.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19172 posts in 2135 days


#10 posted 12-20-2011 01:18 AM

knotscott,

Thanks for filling one of the MANY gaps in my brain. Now I can pretend I know what I’m talking about as I search for a table saw for my shop.

Now if I only knew what a table saw is….LOL.

Again, thanks for the info.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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