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Beginner Re-Sawing Blade Question

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Forum topic by Joel J posted 05-02-2018 10:54 PM 949 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel J

48 posts in 2136 days


05-02-2018 10:54 PM

I have never re-sawn any logs and would like to give it a try. I have a 14” Jet bandsaw with a 6” riser block. My question is two-fold. One, what kind of blade should I purchase, and two, is it better to resaw a dry log or a wet one? Thanks for the help!

-- Joel, Denver, CO


10 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3845 days


#1 posted 05-02-2018 11:00 PM

Logs tend to crack as they dry so the best
general approach is to saw the logs into
boards as soon as possible after the tree
is felled. Painting the ends of the logs
can lengthen the time you have before they
crack.

If you want boards thinner than 4/4 the
best approach is probably to saw the log
into perhaps 8/4 boards and dry them,
then saw thinner when the wood is dry.

That’s for boards suitable for furniture. If
you are sawing up smaller boughs for
making boxes and small things of course
you could cut the wood thinner the first
time.

A basic skip-tooth 1/2” 3tp rip blade should
get you started. They can be resharpened
with a dremel-type tool on a cradle by inverting
the blade on the saw and grinding the gullets.
This gradually reduces the tooth set to where
the blade may not work so well resawing
wet wood.

View msinc's profile

msinc

569 posts in 701 days


#2 posted 05-03-2018 02:04 AM

Not sure I follow…..you say you would like to “re-saw” a log? If it’s a log it has never been sawed to begin with so how is it a re-saw? Okay, lets forget about saw/re-saw for a minute…maybe I am not reading this right, but if a 14” bandsaw was all it took to make lumber from logs…I would have never bought a Hud-Son sawmill.
It is my understanding that the term “re-saw” is when you take a bigger piece of lumber and re-saw it to smaller pieces of lumber…such as a 6”X6” beam and saw it into 1”X6” boards to use for something else. No logs involved.
A 14” bandsaw is not a sawmill. Maybe we are not talking about full size logs. I have seen a bandsaw sled that you can put a very small “log” {short piece of a branch is a better description} on and mill but the piece you are cutting is so small I don’t know if you need a special blade or not. How big of a log do you intend to saw up???
I will add one other thing…wet logs do definitely saw easier, period end of story. They also will rust up your saw quickly due to the moisture and the often acidic content of the sap. Also, if you do get green logs sawed up into lumber, get it out of your shop and keep it out until it has had some time to dry out some. I made the mistake of leaving fresh milled green lumber in my shop over night once, just till I could stack it in the morning and imagine my surprise when I looked at a red table on my brand new PM2000 and every other machine I own!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3163 posts in 1678 days


#3 posted 05-03-2018 02:20 PM

Definitely dry. Sawing green wood is possible but fraught with difficulties mostly with clogging.

Basically on a resaw blade you want a low tooth count (3-4/inch) and at least a 1/2” blade.

For sawing a log I wouldn’t go higher than 3/inch.

I suggest go to Highland Hardware and buy one of the Woodslicer resaw blades. Not the greatest but I’ve had decent luck with them.

Here's a good source to look at.

I’ll caution you not to abuse this saw. It is not that hard to over heat the motor and blade and loose a tire.

How do I know that????

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2512 posts in 2042 days


#4 posted 05-03-2018 02:42 PM


Definitely dry. Sawing green wood is possible but fraught with difficulties mostly with clogging.

Basically on a resaw blade you want a low tooth count (3-4/inch) and at least a 1/2” blade.

For sawing a log I wouldn t go higher than 3/inch.

I suggest go to Highland Hardware and buy one of the Woodslicer resaw blades. Not the greatest but I ve had decent luck with them.

Here s a good source to look at.

I ll caution you not to abuse this saw. It is not that hard to over heat the motor and blade and loose a tire.

How do I know that????

- rwe2156

We use a 1/2 inch carbide blade and it does a great job, but as mentioned green wood will require a lot of cleanup. We cut up a 10’ or so section of maple that fell in a storm recently and was on the ground for maybe 2 weeks, made about 20 turning blanks for my wife, but it took a couple of hours to clean up the blade, the table, the guides, the wheels, and the inside of our Grizzly 14 inch saw kept clogging up. Impressive pile of blanks, but a lot of cleanup. The swarf (?) started to harden really fast , so had to be scrubbed with a pitch cleaner.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Joel J's profile

Joel J

48 posts in 2136 days


#5 posted 05-04-2018 01:14 AM

Loren, rwe, & Rob: Thank you for your very constructive comments….very helpful and just the kind of info that I can benefit from.

msinc: You are correct…...please substitute “saw” for “resaw”.

-- Joel, Denver, CO

View buckhorn_cortez's profile

buckhorn_cortez

7 posts in 240 days


#6 posted 05-11-2018 03:05 AM

Your 14-inch saw can take up to a 3/4-inch blade. I have a 14-inch Delta with a riser block – basically the same saw as yours in design and function. I use a 3/4-inch, carbide tipped blade. It is VERY slow going sawing any type of hardwood. I have replaced the motor on mine with a 1-1/2 HP – it’s still slow. Within the last month, I’ve re-sawed 8/4 mahogany, and 8/4 hard maple. The mahogany was 8-inches wide and the hard maple was 5-inches wide.

The trade-off between the 1/2-inch blade and a 3/4-inch blade is that the 1/2-inch blade is easier for the saw to turn in the wood as there is less blade surface and friction in the cut, while the 3/4-inch blade is stiffer and deflects less than the 1/2-inch blade making straighter cuts easier.

I have a skip tooth 1/2-inch blade that I’ve used for re-sawing, but find the 3/4-inch blade makes a better cut at nearly the same feed rate. I also lubricate the blade. Some people like to use Pam kitchen spray on the blade, I use both Bostik Blade Coat and Slipit. Both work about the same. I have the gel type Slipit and apply it with a 1-inch paint brush to both sides of the blade while the saw is running just before I start sawing. If it’s a long board, I have a helper apply more lubricant to the blade as I’m cutting.

Cutting wet wood will be more difficult than dry wood as there will be more friction and your feed rate will be slower – but, if you’re patient, and take your time sawing, I’m sure you could cut the wood.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1070 posts in 2784 days


#7 posted 05-11-2018 07:46 AM

I use a 3/4” carbide tip resaw blade to cut logs in 1/2 for turning. The log shown is approximately 12” across. I put the blanks in a paper bag and forget about them for awhile before turning a bowl.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1480 posts in 801 days


#8 posted 05-13-2018 12:13 AM


Not sure I follow…..you say you would like to “re-saw” a log? If it s a log it has never been sawed to begin with so how is it a re-saw? Okay, lets forget about saw/re-saw for a minute…maybe I am not reading this right, but if a 14” bandsaw was all it took to make lumber from logs…I would have never bought a Hud-Son sawmill.
- msinc

I think when he says logs he’s referring to the 6-12 inch rounds that he can put through his BS.

As others might tell you, I believe that the general rule of thumb is that anything cut to less than 1/2 it’s thickness will warp badly. For instance, if you resaw your log into 2” (8/4) slices as Loren said above and sticker them until they are dry you can then resaw them into 1” boards to mill down to 3/4” stock then either use them immediately or sticker them until time to use them. If you sliced off a 1/4” piece from an 8/4 board it will curl like a potato chip.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1480 posts in 801 days


#9 posted 05-13-2018 03:36 AM

P.S. You can then bookmatch those 3/4” boards into something nice and learn a boatload of skills along the way. :-}

Resawing logs on a bandsaw.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Steve's profile

Steve

733 posts in 780 days


#10 posted 05-14-2018 02:13 PM

This reminds me that I need to build a jig for re-sawing. I tried to do a small branch free hand and I took care of the cupping myself. lol

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