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Drill press adjustment question

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Forum topic by MStaples posted 05-27-2011 04:09 PM 1111 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MStaples

3 posts in 2021 days


05-27-2011 04:09 PM

New to woodworking here and would like to upgrade from a small table top DP to good quality floor DP. Something I don’t understand after looking at the manuals of various high quality DPs: Is there not a fine adjustment (not a tilting table, just an adjustment) for the fore and aft attitude of the table to get the table and quill accurately at 90 degrees to each other in this plane? The adjustment ability could be in the head to achieve the same thing I suppose, but I don’t see any way to do that either. What am I missing here?

Thanks for you help,

Michael S


14 replies so far

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#1 posted 05-27-2011 04:12 PM

Sorry I can’t help, Michael. Mine has an adjustment screw. I bet that if you post the brand and model of press, someone here is surely to help. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#2 posted 05-27-2011 04:44 PM

^2nd Cr1, if you can find a Walker Turner, you’ll be doing yourself a great favor. On rare occasion, I see big radial presses on CL but they’re often 3ph. If you buy a Walker Turner, buy a floor crane while you’re at it:) Those things are beastly.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3659 days


#3 posted 05-27-2011 05:10 PM

If you’re looking to go to a floor model DP that’s well suited to woodworking, here’s a thought. (now, bear with me, while I’m biased in this regard, there’s plenty of independent info supporting what I have to say). Find a used Shopsmith, usually between $200 and $400. (Craig’s list is a good source).

Ask anyone who uses one for woodworking. It’s east to set up to be dead on, and as a bonus at no extra cost or floor space, you have other uses like the horizontal boring (I actually use this more than the DP, I think), 12” disk sander that allows you to move the disk to the work which is easier that ramming the work into the disk, lathe, and even the much maligned table saw. All on wheels and with variable speed from about 800-5200 rpm’s.

Yes, anyone who’s read my stuff here knows I’m a Shopsmith nut, and I’m sure it’s not the end-all, be-all machine for everybody, but think about it. It might work well for you. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#4 posted 05-27-2011 05:14 PM

^I’m not a big ShopSmith guy but you sure have a good point, Tom. For someone starting out, it’s a very versatile machine with a reasonable footprint and oftentimes a great price. If I was in the early stages of my tool addiction, I’d be looking at the ShopSmith hard.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3659 days


#5 posted 05-27-2011 05:31 PM

Bertha, thanks for the support. Something else I forgot to mention is the build quality of the Smiths. While I can’t attest to the newer ones, (mine range from 1951 – 1986) they do, with basic lube & maintenance, seem to run forever. If they’ve been sitting a long time before I get one, I rebuild with all new bearings, but that only costs a few bucks & a couple hours, and the machine is like new…good for another 25-50 years.

Michael, If you actually consider looking for a Smith, feel free to PM me for additional info & tips on things to look for & avoid. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#6 posted 05-27-2011 05:39 PM

Tom, I know little of the newer machines but the war era machines are built like a tank. They’re hard to kill, from what everyone tells me.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#7 posted 05-27-2011 05:40 PM

A quick search in my area found one for $550. No pics but it sounds like it’s in good shape.

http://charlestonwv.craigslist.org/tls/2386101668.html

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#8 posted 05-27-2011 05:58 PM

I considered getting a shopsmith for a dedicated drill press for a long time. I ended up getting an rigid drill press and then augmented with a Radial drill press I found at a yard sale for $50.

Niki was an expert on this topic and had all kinds of Jigs and information. Unfortunately, he passed away a while back and it appears the site deleted everything but his project posts.

One question I would have for you is do you know you have an issue? I would think that if the machine was out of square (and there is no adjustment), it would be a reason to return the machine.

Another thought is that if your woodworking for a while your going to add an auxillary table to your drill press. Adjusters could be added to the table to ensure it is 90 degrees and you could solve the problem that way.

Here is an example of one of these aux tables:

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/39213

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#9 posted 05-27-2011 06:10 PM

I don’t use my drill press all that often, certainly less than most people here. I’ve got an XYZ mill vise on mine that I could shim if I had to, I suppose. An auxillary table would allow the same shimming but I agree with everyone above that you shouldn’t be experiencing this issue in the first place.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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MStaples

3 posts in 2021 days


#10 posted 05-27-2011 08:05 PM

Wow! This is one of the most helpful forums I’ve used (I think I’ll stick around!).

More detail: The small, cheap tabletop DP that I have been using has a fore/after tilt issue and plenty of other shortcomings that beg for replacement. I thought that maybe it didn’t have the ability to adjust for this because it’s a cheap DP and was looking for this feature in a high quality replacement. I take it now that the post lines things up in most unless there is a manufacturing problem so I won’t continue to look for a DP with that feature, but will buy the best DP that I can afford that suits my purpose and expect it to be true in that plane

Shopsmithtom: Thanks for the Shopsmith suggestion, I will consider it.

Thanks again everyone!

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#11 posted 05-27-2011 08:28 PM

Please do stick around MStaples. If I were in the market for a new DP, I’d be looking at vintage machines on craigslist (and I might be sometime soon). Best bang for your buck, in my opinion.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#12 posted 05-27-2011 08:32 PM

If you do stick around I think you will enjoy it. IMHO, this is the best woodworking formum on the net.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3659 days


#13 posted 05-27-2011 10:47 PM

Yes, stick around. This is a great place to learn stuff & show off stuff. And, as I said, if you look at Shopsmiths and aren’t familiar with them, as with anything, you should get all the useful info you can before diving in. If you need it, let me know. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Richard's profile

Richard

1898 posts in 2155 days


#14 posted 05-28-2011 05:44 PM

Yes you really do want to stick around if your planning on doing any woodworking. This site has more info than any other I have looked at, most of them just seem to be continual reposts of the same old stuff over and over. Here you see lots of new projects, reviews of tools both old and new and fixes for the tools and project goofs that we all have or will make.
Even though I don’t have a Shop per say at the moment I really have gotten lots of ideas on projects I can do can do with my my limited tools and space that I reeally didn’t think I could do before.
So now it is time to do the laundry and then tackle the peskey 45 dgree lock miter bit again and see if I can make something other than sawdust with it.And yes I am reading a bunch of prior posts about useing it and have gotten some new ideas to try.

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