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Question about Grippers and similar push blocks

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Forum topic by mpounders posted 05-26-2011 06:12 PM 1500 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mpounders

733 posts in 1549 days


05-26-2011 06:12 PM

I am building one of these based on plans someone posted on LJ and I have a question! The plans I have call for a T-track on top to enable the handle to slide from side to side. I was wondering if was necessary or desirable to be able to adjust the handle like that, I am supposing so that you will be pushing down right over the blade????? It would be simpler construction to just center the handle and screw it down or to possibly have the handle running perpendicular to the saw blade rather than parallel….then you could just position your hand wherever you wanted. Or I could attach the handle to the middle hold-down section underneath, so that the handle is always centerd over that section and adjusts when it adjusts? So I guess the main question is does the handle need to move sideways or not? I’m hoping someone who uses either the real deal or a shop-built model could advise me a bit!

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com


7 replies so far

View mrg's profile

mrg

521 posts in 1653 days


#1 posted 05-26-2011 06:27 PM

I have the Gripper and usually have the handle in the center. Just a personal choice. I could see moving the handle say when you are ripping 1/8” strips or working on the router table so your hand does not rub against the fence. Think how some of the push pads are packaged with the handles to one side so you can turn them 180 degrees and have the handle leaning to the other side.

In the case of the gripper if you have the whole kit you can configure the set up according to the task at hand.

-- mrg

View GregD's profile

GregD

616 posts in 1789 days


#2 posted 05-26-2011 06:54 PM

Only occasionally do I put the handle someplace other than in the center.

-- Greg D.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2953 days


#3 posted 05-27-2011 04:52 PM

I think the Gripper is adjustable, because everyone has the choice of where their comfort level is.

Some people are left handed.

If your using it for yourself, position it where you feel the most comfortable.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View moke's profile

moke

494 posts in 1430 days


#4 posted 05-27-2011 07:58 PM

I occasionally use my gripper to make thin segments for pens or other small projects. I use the 1/8” thickness end….I like to keep pressure right over the top of the piece so I usually use the handle slid clear to the right.

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1579 days


#5 posted 05-27-2011 09:07 PM

I know some like to build all their own jigs and fixtures and they can be enjoyable too, but I would prefer to use the store-bought one to work on larger projects…

I have mine in the middle, haven’t moved it yet.

Mike, why would you build one out of wood instead of buying the bright plastic one?

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1663 days


#6 posted 05-27-2011 09:29 PM

On my GRR-rippers I have the handles unparallel to the blade – they are slightly angled such that the pressure applied automatically pushes against the fence. I set them up that way when I first got them and haven’t needed to change things over thousands of cuts at the TS.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

733 posts in 1549 days


#7 posted 05-29-2011 06:49 AM

Thanks for the input, I’ll simplify my handle attachment. I have been impressed by the real deal, but I would like to test it and see if I like it and would use it in my shop. So rather than just throw $50-$75 away on something I might not like, I’ll spend $5 on a few parts and see what it does for me. And then I’ll have to determine if there might be a tremendous difference between what I built and what I could buy…. I have a lot of Ideas on what I might spend that extra money on, but it is important that all my parts remain attached to my hands!

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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