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Forum topic by PassMeTheBandAids posted 04-27-2018 01:26 AM 650 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PassMeTheBandAids

5 posts in 111 days


04-27-2018 01:26 AM

Hello, I’m a somewhat beginner woodworker. My neighbor just finished putting in a Hickory floor in his home expansion project and I asked him for any scrap cutoffs. He gladly gave me not only some good size pieces of the Hickory flooring but some scraps of the tongue and groove cedar ceiling pieces. My plan was to plane off the grooves from the Hickory and hopefully make something useful to give back. Looking for ideas for a kitchen like a tray or box that would be good for me as a beginner. All ideas are welcome. At my disposal are a bench top band saw, drill press, table saw, miter saw, scroll saw and a disk/belt sander.

Thanks,
Max


14 replies so far

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bilyo

275 posts in 1183 days


#1 posted 04-27-2018 01:45 AM

Nice thought. How about a hickory cutting board.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1957 posts in 1887 days


#2 posted 04-27-2018 03:10 AM

I got a stack of Jatoba flooring, makes great pot scrapers? Did destroy a set of HSS planer blades cleaning off the finish and milling to size.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2267 posts in 1468 days


#3 posted 04-27-2018 11:57 AM

You might try searching LJ projects ideas. Serving trays, cutting boards, wooden spoons or spatulas, lazy Susan…

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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PassMeTheBandAids

5 posts in 111 days


#4 posted 04-27-2018 12:58 PM

Great ideas so far. Like the cutting board.
Andre, I was concerned about the finish removal and the planer. I thought I would try sanding the finish off but not sure how much work that would be.

Lazyman, I did see a serving tray that I liked, I’m going to sort it all this weekend and see just what I have in terms of good stuff.

Thanks for the input so far.

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Lazyman

2267 posts in 1468 days


#5 posted 04-28-2018 03:30 AM

If you have a belt sander, that would make quick work at stripping off the old finish.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1790 posts in 3524 days


#6 posted 04-28-2018 04:38 PM

If you rip the width of the boards down to less than 3” you can run them through your table saw just enough to remove the finish and flatten the surfaces. Use feather boards to keep the pieces against the fence if necessary. I’m concerned that using the belt sander to remove the finish and grooves may leave a slightly uneven surface.
A planer or drum sander would work best but you lack access so go with what you have.
If you think you will use the wood for end grain cutting boards just a light sanding of the finish would due. Then glue the pieces together with a urethane glue (Gorilla glue).....a very thin application is all that is needed.

-- Les B, Oregon

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PassMeTheBandAids

5 posts in 111 days


#7 posted 04-28-2018 06:34 PM

Forgot to mention I have a planer. I wasn’t sure if planning the finish off or sanding it would work best. After sorting it all out I have some real small scraps that I can experiment with on removing the finish.

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Lazyman

2267 posts in 1468 days


#8 posted 04-29-2018 02:43 PM

Planing off a finish can dull your knives so is generally not recommended. Never plane off white paint as it often contains titanium and will really do a number on your blades. Even if you need to plane it anyway, I would strip the finish with a belt sander first.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1237 posts in 243 days


#9 posted 04-29-2018 04:01 PM

I love Hickory wood !!!!

to advance your skills a little, this would be make a good “intermediate” project
to hone your joinery skills and make a very nice project. good luck !

(and the leftover scraps that do not have a finish on them can be used in your smoker).

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Rich's profile

Rich

3336 posts in 670 days


#10 posted 04-29-2018 04:14 PM


I love Hickory wood !!!!

to advance your skills a little, this would be make a good “intermediate” project
to hone your joinery skills and make a very nice project. good luck !

(and the leftover scraps that do not have a finish on them can be used in your smoker).

- John Smith

That’s a nice tray, John. I assume you built it. Why not make it a project so more folks can enjoy it?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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John Smith

1237 posts in 243 days


#11 posted 04-29-2018 06:06 PM

sorry Rich – I didn’t build that particular one.
I just pulled it quickly from the net as an example for Max.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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Rich

3336 posts in 670 days


#12 posted 04-29-2018 08:32 PM

No sweat, John. Once he gets his feet wet on your idea, maybe he can tackle this:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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PassMeTheBandAids

5 posts in 111 days


#13 posted 05-02-2018 09:15 PM

So, I just got the chance yesterday to start running some of this through the planer. I bought my planer used and didn’t change out the blades so I have no idea how old they are. I figure if I ruin them then no big deal. The finish is coming off slowly. I was wondering about sending smaller pieces (6 in and smaller) through. Not sure if it’s safe to maybe double stick tape a bunch on a longer board or just scrap them.

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Lazyman

2267 posts in 1468 days


#14 posted 05-03-2018 01:38 AM

I can be a little tricky and even dangerous to send small pieces through the planer but I have done it by making sure that you put multiple pieces back to back so that the next one pushes the previous one through. The last one will likely get snipe or even chewed up so if you can, send a longer piece through last, Don’t stand in the line of fire in case one gets ejected.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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