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Forum topic by MashMaster posted 04-25-2018 02:52 PM 321 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MashMaster

134 posts in 2739 days


04-25-2018 02:52 PM

I finished my table and now my wife wants kitchen chairs that better match the new table for our kitchen. I found a design I like but have a couple of questions regarding the best way to achieve the end result I am looking for. The back has a bend in it for the legs and the back slats.

For the slats, would it be best to cut 1/4” thick pieces and steam them and bend them to shape?

For the legs, I think they are too thick to be bend so I will need to start with very thick stock and cut them to shape. That will have so much waste, is there a different way?

I attached pictures of the table I made and the chair design she likes.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX


6 replies so far

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PPK

1095 posts in 888 days


#1 posted 04-25-2018 03:11 PM

Best luck on your build! I built my first set of chairs, and enjoyed it thoroughly. Here’s a link to the blog I made about building my chairs, they are similar design to what you’re doing, although you’d have to adapt some things. I’m no professional by any means, but perhaps you could glean some things that would be helpful.

http://lumberjocks.com/PPK/blog/88538

And as concerns your question about the back slats – I’d steam bend them. That’s just my personal preference: I really like steaming wood. I also think the results of steam bending are a prettier than glue-lam, and stronger than re-sawn curves.

-- Pete

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MashMaster

134 posts in 2739 days


#2 posted 04-25-2018 03:23 PM



Best luck on your build! I built my first set of chairs, and enjoyed it thoroughly. Here s a link to the blog I made about building my chairs, they are similar design to what you re doing, although you d have to adapt some things. I m no professional by any means, but perhaps you could glean some things that would be helpful.

http://lumberjocks.com/PPK/blog/88538

And as concerns your question about the back slats – I d steam bend them. That s just my personal preference: I really like steaming wood. I also think the results of steam bending are a prettier than glue-lam, and stronger than re-sawn curves.

- PPK

Thanks! Your build is similar in many ways and very helpful. I wish I could sit it the chairs that my wife picked to really figure out the shapes and feel.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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PPK

1095 posts in 888 days


#3 posted 04-25-2018 03:30 PM

I’d be happy to share my plans for the dining room chair with you if you want. It’d give you the dimensions that things need to be at least. One thing that seems to me the most noticable is the recline angle. My chairs are set up for a “formal” angle, and as such you don’t really lean back at all. I believe the angle is 4 degrees or so. I think your chairs have a really good feature with the lumbar support at the bottom, and I suppose this would increase the recline angle without actually reclining the back much. I hope that make sense…

-- Pete

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MashMaster

134 posts in 2739 days


#4 posted 04-25-2018 03:41 PM



I d be happy to share my plans for the dining room chair with you if you want. It d give you the dimensions that things need to be at least. One thing that seems to me the most noticable is the recline angle. My chairs are set up for a “formal” angle, and as such you don t really lean back at all. I believe the angle is 4 degrees or so. I think your chairs have a really good feature with the lumbar support at the bottom, and I suppose this would increase the recline angle without actually reclining the back much. I hope that make sense…

- PPK

I would love that! I like how the curve looks on the back, I just don’t know how it will feel….

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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Loren

10477 posts in 3727 days


#5 posted 04-25-2018 03:51 PM

You can extrapolate the shapes using drafting
techniques. There was an old, old article in
Fine Woodworking about how to do it to
reproduce antiques from museum photographs.
Personally I’d make a mockup of the seat and
front legs and make an educated guess about
the rear leg shape. A mockup of the seat can
be made by making a 2x frame with corners
notched out for legs and 1/4” plywood skins on
the faces.

That chair is not too complicated. The joints
appear to be 90 degrees.

Steam bending is a good way to do the back
slats. With a gentle bend like that in thin stock
I’ve had success steaming the part and clamping
it in a 2-part caul cut on the bandsaw. You have
to exaggerate the curve by about twice to
compensate for springback.

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MashMaster

134 posts in 2739 days


#6 posted 04-25-2018 04:06 PM



You can extrapolate the shapes using drafting
techniques. There was an old, old article in
Fine Woodworking about how to do it to
reproduce antiques from museum photographs.
Personally I d make a mockup of the seat and
front legs and make an educated guess about
the rear leg shape. A mockup of the seat can
be made by making a 2x frame with corners
notched out for legs and 1/4” plywood skins on
the faces.

That chair is not too complicated. The joints
appear to be 90 degrees.

Steam bending is a good way to do the back
slats. With a gentle bend like that in thin stock
I ve had success steaming the part and clamping
it in a 2-part caul cut on the bandsaw. You have
to exaggerate the curve by about twice to
compensate for springback.

- Loren

Yeah, I figure I will make a test chair out of cheap wood to try it out prior to the final chair. Thanks for the feedback about the bending. It should be a fun and mind boggling project.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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