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Forum topic by QUlrich posted 04-24-2018 03:59 PM 672 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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QUlrich

15 posts in 116 days


04-24-2018 03:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question sanding

Hello everybody.

I am new to the forum, but have been woodworking for about 2 or 3 years at this point. I had a question regarding something i have encountered while finishing some projects before and would like to see if anyone else has encountered this/knows a workaround.

I do a good deal of lathe work, and much of my sanding is also done on the lathe since I believe it to be a more thorough way of sanding since there is less impatience/fatigue. However, occasionally while sanding with wet/dry sandpaper, the paper will leave a fine gray particulate which embeds itself into the grain of the wood and turns it gray. This has happened both on and off the lathe, using the paper both wet and dry.

i am not exactly sure why it happens, at it seems to only be with certain woods as well. For example, i have never has it happen with black walnut, but spalted maple seems to do it fairly often.

Does anyone have any ideas? I’d be interested to hear.


21 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3732 days


#1 posted 04-24-2018 04:31 PM

I think wet/dry paper is really made for sanding
metal and finishes, not porous materials like
wood. I usually use stearated fine grit paper
on bare wood. The stearates are a lubricant.

View mel52's profile

mel52

482 posts in 348 days


#2 posted 04-24-2018 05:42 PM

I agree with Loren. I have used wet/dry on lathe turnings, but sparingly and very lightly without problems. Using these only after going to a very high numbered reg. sand paper.

-- MEL, Kansas

View Rich's profile

Rich

3342 posts in 673 days


#3 posted 04-24-2018 05:43 PM

I use regular sandpaper on bare wood. Mirka, Norton, it really doesn’t matter as long as it’s a good quality paper. I save the stearated paper for rough sanding (220 to 600) between finish coats. The lubricant helps reduce corning. Finally, I treat wet/dry paper as wet only. I never use it dry. On finish between coats, it corns like crazy if it’s dry.

For wet/dry paper I keep a spray bottle of about a 10 or 12 to 1 mixture of water and dish soap to use as a lubricant when I’m sanding a surface like a table top between coats of finish. If I’m sanding a small area like a burn-in fill, I use a rub cut oil. I keep a small bottle of oil and grits down to 2500 along with pumice and rottenstone in my repair/refinish kit.

Edit: There are claims that stearated paper can cause problems with fisheye in water bourne topcoats because of the lubricant used in the paper. Jeff Jewitt claims to have debunked that however. I just figure it’s cheaper and safer to use regular paper on bare wood.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1247 posts in 246 days


#4 posted 04-24-2018 06:39 PM

I recently switched over to the 3M SandBlaster Pro flexible sanding sheets
for lathe work….. I must say, it lives up to the hype of lasting 15 times longer
than paper and removes material much faster without clogging.
has a rubber backing, can be used wet or dry, and will not stain or discolor wood.
it is well worth your time to try it. (and leave the gray wet-n-dry paper to metal only).

just my Dos Centavos

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1787 posts in 2073 days


#5 posted 04-24-2018 06:54 PM

Wet/dry black or gray paper is used only for wet sanding of finishes, or for metal. I wet sand finishes of turnings and flatwork with it. Lamp oil or ms works great, no chance of getting the wood wet with water. Use regular sand paper for wood, enen hi grits like 600. I prefer 3M 216U for bare wood and dry sanding of finishes.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4896 posts in 2435 days


#6 posted 04-24-2018 09:03 PM

Use different sandpaper.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8294 posts in 2661 days


#7 posted 04-25-2018 01:30 AM

Scotch Brite comes in different grits and I switched to that after residuals were left from the sandpaper.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5488 posts in 2493 days


#8 posted 04-25-2018 01:34 AM

Try micro mesh. Small pads that do not produce this result. Light colored woods, like maple, gave me the fits until I started using this stuff.

Maybe not the best price just a result of quick google search. https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/mi30000/?inMed=GSTORE&dfw_tracker=18711-3137&gclid=EAIaIQobChMInoj8laTU2gIVVrjACh1nlAjUEAQYASABEgLRo_D_BwE

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3342 posts in 673 days


#9 posted 04-25-2018 01:38 AM


Scotch Brite comes in different grits and I switched to that after residuals were left from the sandpaper.

- waho6o9

Getting into the realm of non-woven pads, for my money nothing can beat Mirka Mirlon Total. The red pads are 320 grit, the grey is 1500 and the other one (they call it beige, but I don’t see it) is 2500. I find them far superior to 3M pads and they are washable and reusable, so the cost is very low.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8294 posts in 2661 days


#10 posted 04-25-2018 01:41 AM

Good to know thank you Rich!

View Rich's profile

Rich

3342 posts in 673 days


#11 posted 04-25-2018 01:44 AM


Try micro mesh. Small pads that do not produce this result. Light colored woods, like maple, gave me the fits until I started using this stuff.

- woodbutcherbynight

Those things are awesome. I had just bought a new Starrett dial caliper when I carelessly set my ROS down while it was still spinning and caught the cover on the dial. It was unreadable on about half of the dial. My heart was broken, but I pulled out my micro mesh and went through the grits and the scratches completely disappeared.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Rich's profile

Rich

3342 posts in 673 days


#12 posted 04-25-2018 01:49 AM


Good to know thank you Rich!

- waho6o9

You bet. They’re about $3 a pad at Woodcraft, but on Amazon you can buy boxes of 20 4 1/2 by 9 pads for about $1 each. They also have the red and grey in thirty-something foot rolls that are a little less.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Walker's profile

Walker

142 posts in 556 days


#13 posted 04-25-2018 02:01 AM

Micro Mesh can be cleaned and reused. I used to use it on my fingernails when I was a classical guitar player. I’ve never thought about using it on wood, though several sites appear to sell it as such. Also on Amazon and eBay, and overpriced on Rockler. I got it from a guitar accessories site called stringsbymail.com

-- ~Walker

View QUlrich's profile

QUlrich

15 posts in 116 days


#14 posted 04-25-2018 02:58 AM

Thanks for all the responses. I actually do have micromesh pads, 3 sets of them actually, but I haven’t gotten to using them yet as I figured they would just replace the wet/dry. Looks like I’ll be shelving the paper and trying out the pads next time.

Thanks again everybody!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

276 posts in 1186 days


#15 posted 04-25-2018 04:35 PM

All good information above. One more tip if I may: keep in mind that when sanding on the lathe, a lot of the sanding is going on cross grain. This tends to tear the grain of the wood and leave scratches that look like fine annular rings on your turning. In theory, you can keep using finer and finer grits to eventually eliminate the scratches. However, after sanding on the lathe through about 180 to 220 grit, I have gotten good results by removing the piece from the lathe and finish sanding by hand following the direction of the grain.

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