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Craftsman 12" Band Saw Questions/Help

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Forum topic by spindeepster posted 04-22-2018 05:52 PM 752 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spindeepster

40 posts in 1493 days


04-22-2018 05:52 PM

Hi All. I just picked up this band saw for FIFTY BUCKS!

A rip fence from my table saw works perfectly on this saw. The only mod is a scrap of wood that you can’t see in this pic, it’s at the other end.

Sadly, the previous owner abused the saw, and did not attach blades properly. The parts pictured are horribly worn. As I don’t have a manual, can you advise on the names of these worn parts, and, hopefully point me toward a source for replacements?

Lastly. Looking straight down the blade, is the roller mechanism pushing the blade too far to the left (the pic is upside down).?

Thank you in advance for any insight you may provide.


14 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7050 posts in 2401 days


#1 posted 04-22-2018 06:03 PM

Get the manual so you have a parts list… they are available online. As for your question about the guide bearing in the last picture, it should be behind the blade, not beside it. And before you throw too much money into that saw, you might want to check out this impartial review of a similar C-man tilt head bandsaw by Mattias over at woodgears.ca:

Craftsman bandsaw repair fail

For the impatient, here is the end result :-O

Cheers,
Brad

PS: The guide blocks you show (second to last picture) can easily be re-faced on a grinder or belt sander – and the bearing should be a pretty standard off the shelf part you can get almost anywhere.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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spindeepster

40 posts in 1493 days


#2 posted 04-22-2018 07:49 PM

He isn’t wearing eye protection. He isn’t very smart, is he?

The guide blocks are reversable. Left side to right, right to left…good as new. I found bearings on ebay….I’m in business.

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ohtimberwolf

871 posts in 2554 days


#3 posted 04-23-2018 12:20 AM

spin, I’m sure his glasses are safety glasses and I assure you, he is not at all a dummy. Did you see his test of the machine? Not choosing sides, just sayin. larry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=832BnwMLeX0

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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spindeepster

40 posts in 1493 days


#4 posted 04-23-2018 11:47 AM

Oh I don’t know ohtimberwolf. At the 3:55 mark you can see he’s working on the saw and it’s plugged in. He’s a dummy alright. The plastic gear that tilts the saw is missing a tooth? I seriously doubt I’ll ever use that feature anyway. Also, I have much to learn. I need to find out why I would want to hang my entire body weight on the top of a band saw. I’ll be the first to admit, it’s not the greatest band saw out there, but it isn’t the turd this guy makes it out to be either. Clearly this one was abused and neglected before this guy got his hands on it. When I get my new bearings, I’ll post a vid of how my repair works out. Cheers!

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ohtimberwolf

871 posts in 2554 days


#5 posted 04-23-2018 12:02 PM

I know you will have fun with it, I have never picked up a tool that I didn’t enjoy messing with. Seems like it gets addictive. :) Be sure to post your progress. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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MrUnix

7050 posts in 2401 days


#6 posted 04-24-2018 02:39 AM

Oh I don t know ohtimberwolf. At the 3:55 mark you can see he s working on the saw and it s plugged in. He s a dummy alright.

That is a pretty bold assertion for someone who, based on your comments above, apparently has never used a band saw before. Mattias is one of the most prolific woodworkers around, and has built two bandsaws (and lots of other stuff) from scratch that lots of others have since duplicated. He knows his stuff, despite your dismissal, and a quick look at just his bandsaw pages might sway your opinion a bit.

The plastic gear that tilts the saw is missing a tooth? I seriously doubt I ll ever use that feature anyway. Also, I have much to learn. I need to find out why I would want to hang my entire body weight on the top of a band saw.
- spindeepster

If you don’t think you will ever use the saw for bevel cuts, then the plastic gear is not an issue. However, it does highlight the nature of the machine where a metal gear would have been more appropriate. And as he stated, hanging on the top of the machine was to simulate blade tension and show the amount of flex in the aluminum body – not something that you would do normally except for demonstration purposes.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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runswithscissors

2892 posts in 2227 days


#7 posted 04-24-2018 03:57 AM

Tilting head saws were common during the wooden ship building era, and you do still see an old one around occasionally. Extremely useful for cutting bevels on big timbers. Imagine handling a 6 X 10 while cutting a bevel on a tilting table. Yikes! I wonder if anybody has considered building a high quality tilting head BS for the small or home shop? I think anyone who does a lot of bevel cuts would find it handy.

I looked at Craftsman’s version when it first came out, and was not impressed, I’m sorry to say. The aluminum castings were crude and the parts did not fit well. They had job site table saws with the same crude, ill-fitting components around the same time. The table extensions, for example, not only weren’t flush, but sagged noticeably.

Still, I don’t like squelching someone’s excitement at getting a new tool. Learn to use it, get the most out of it that you can, and discover the aspects of it that will guide you in getting your next bandsaw. $50 is a fairly cheap learning experience. But if this one should disappoint you, don’t let it put you off bandsaws altogether. There are some truly excellent ones out there.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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spindeepster

40 posts in 1493 days


#8 posted 04-24-2018 11:13 AM

Well MrUnix, I seem to have touched a nerve. You state, “based on your comments above, apparently has never used a bandsaw before”. Where did you get that information?

Up until this thread, I had never heard of Matthias before. Now he may very well be the greatest woodworker since Jesus, but the fact remains. He destroyed something with no eye protection beyond prescription eyeglasses. And you can’t deny, he is working on a partially disassembled piece of machinery and it’s plugged in! What would you do if you saw your 12 year old child or grandchild working on an energized tool?

Lastly, I don’t know how much Matthias weighs, but if he is applying all of his weight against the teeth of a band saw’s blade, enough to stress the framework of the tool, he needs a new blade.

His review doesn’t wash, no more than dragging a beat to death, abused car from a junkyard to review a new car.

Stay safe out there….

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ohtimberwolf

871 posts in 2554 days


#9 posted 04-24-2018 12:00 PM

I’m out of here, I don’t like where it is going. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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kkaucher

20 posts in 522 days


#10 posted 04-24-2018 03:15 PM

I don’t like where it’s coming from or where it’s going.

-- A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown

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MrUnix

7050 posts in 2401 days


#11 posted 04-24-2018 04:20 PM

Well MrUnix, I seem to have touched a nerve.
- spindeepster

I agree – I did appear to hit a nerve and that was not my intention… have fun with your new saw.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View msinc's profile

msinc

569 posts in 706 days


#12 posted 04-25-2018 04:16 AM

I had one of those saws. For what it was it worked fine and I used it for many years. Keep it adjusted and buy good blades and don’t try to do too much with it and you will probably be happy for a while. I mean for $50….don’t expect to rip thick white oak and forget about “re-sawing” or making veneer….it’s not for that. I had mine set up with a thin blade and it was great to cut out intricate parts…I didn’t have to change blades on the big saw. Take it easy and go a little slower, you will see the correct feed speed and just how it wants to cut. As to the blade guides, I have a buddy that still uses this same saw. He cut out white oak blade guides and they work just fine. Don’t last as long as the aluminum factory ones, but you cant beat the price.

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GR8HUNTER

5133 posts in 914 days


#13 posted 04-25-2018 02:23 PM

GRATZ on your new saw :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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spindeepster

40 posts in 1493 days


#14 posted 05-07-2018 12:40 AM

I bought it for $50.00 I bought 2 thrust bearings. $23.00
I bought 1 blade $13.00

I sold it for $90.00

I win.

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