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Craftsman Table Saw 137.228010 Kicking Breaker!

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Forum topic by Hugh37 posted 04-22-2018 03:58 PM 1662 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


04-22-2018 03:58 PM

My Craftsman Table Saw showed no problem when last used 3 months ago. Today I discovered it blows the breaker when turned on. The cord is in excellent shape and power is reaching the On/OFF switch. I’ve
replaced the ON/OFF switch AND the Overload switch, suspecting one or both were problematic. NO
CHANGE…breaker still kicks when the saw is switched ON. Replaced the breaker, yet problem continues.
The manual’s troubleshooting guide makes no reference to “kicking the breaker”. Can a damaged motor
brush assembly cause the breaker to kick? Hopefully, the problem isn’t more serious. Would be grateful
for any help that may resolve the issue. Thanks! Hugh

-- Paul, Tennessee


25 replies so far

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

670 posts in 620 days


#1 posted 04-22-2018 08:10 PM

My guess is the motor has a bad capacitor or the windings in the motor are shorted. Did you happen to over heat the motor any time recently?

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

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MrUnix

6845 posts in 2279 days


#2 posted 04-22-2018 08:59 PM

Is it tripping the breaker instantly or after a short period of time (and which one… house circuit breaker or the one on the saw)? That machine has a universal screamer motor (no capacitor btw) with a plastic housing. The brushes could be the culprit, which are easy to check, but usually won’t cause the breaker to trip. If it’s tripping instantly, then you have a short somewhere that needs to be tracked down. If it’s tripping after a short period of time, I’d check for binding somewhere.

Unfortunately, if you did heat the machine up by pushing it too far, it is entirely possible that you have warped the plastic housing on the motor – which houses the rear bearing. If that is the case, you might as well toss the machine, as a replacement motor is more expensive than the saw itself. Here is an example of what a trashed rear bearing housing looks like on one of those motors:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#3 posted 04-22-2018 11:17 PM

Kelster58…all I’ve managed to date is check the bushings. They were full of sawdust, otherwise appeared
OK. Blew them clean with my compressor, as well as inside where they fit. Full of hope, I flipped the switch,
but same ‘ol same ‘ol! Haven’t yet looked into the capacitor or windings. MrUnix…it’s tripping the circuit
breaker immediately, before any attempt to run. I’ve plugged into another good circuit and that breaker
instantly blew, as well. Satisfied I haven’t pushed the machine too far…the housing appears in good shape,
no evidence of burning, warping. No evidence of binding, with blade turning normal. I understand from what you say, I have no capacitor to check. Right? Very strange to me that all was working fine when I last used it 3 months ago. Has never before tripped the circuit breaker. As I said, it’s tripping instantly, and I have NO idea where to check for a short. Thanks for your efforts to help…will be grateful for any additional help.

-- Paul, Tennessee

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#4 posted 04-23-2018 12:33 AM

Any chance that the “bearing bushing” or “strain relief bushing” could be the culprit, causing instant
tripping of the circuit breaker?

-- Paul, Tennessee

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Kelster58

670 posts in 620 days


#5 posted 04-23-2018 12:43 AM



Any chance that the “bearing bushing” or “strain relief bushing” could be the culprit, causing instant
tripping of the circuit breaker?

- Hugh37

Hugh37 has a good thought there. Can you disconnect the motor and just operate the switch. That should give you a clue about whether it’s the motor or the conductor…...

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#6 posted 04-23-2018 12:48 AM

Kelster58…I’ll give that a try tomorrow…
thanks.

-- Paul, Tennessee

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MrUnix

6845 posts in 2279 days


#7 posted 04-23-2018 12:59 AM

You could isolate the motor, but to do so, you will need to do it at the switch – you can’t disconnect the wiring from the motor itself without opening it up:

To get to the switch, the plastic cover surrounding it needs to be removed (just 2 screws IIRC) – and then you can unplug the wires from the spade connectors

Also, the rear bearing is installed in either a metal or plastic ‘cup’ that then gets inserted into the motor housing. Unless it’s really, really bad, you would not be able to determine it’s condition from just looking at the motor housing externally. It doesn’t take much distortion to allow the armature to come into contact with the windings. Just saying.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View davezedlee's profile

davezedlee

29 posts in 904 days


#8 posted 04-23-2018 02:30 AM

its pretty common for the rear shielded bearings on those motors to seize

its a pretty simple fix, but you do have to open the motor and need a set of bearing pullers; replacing with sealed bearings helps and should only cost you $6

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davezedlee

29 posts in 904 days


#9 posted 04-23-2018 02:33 AM

i found this video set (there are three) to be very helpful

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCfAKxKv0is

View Hugh37's profile

Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#10 posted 04-23-2018 10:31 AM

davezedlee…thanks. Warrants a try, I
believe. Question: would the saw blade
manually turn if the motor seized? For . For info of all, I bought this saw new in about 2010. I had not recalled, but found the original motor that had failed “some years. ago”, reason unrecalled, but glad I had
kept it…for good parts? I’ll tear into it
before removing the one in the saw.
Again, if the motor has seized, will the
arbor shaft/blade manually turn?
blade

-- Paul, Tennessee

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#11 posted 04-23-2018 10:35 AM

CORRECTION! I bought this saw new in
about May, 2000.

-- Paul, Tennessee

View davezedlee's profile

davezedlee

29 posts in 904 days


#12 posted 04-23-2018 12:36 PM

the motor will turn, but you can see in my photos that the grease had turned to mud

the increased startup voltage required to get the motor moving is probably whats tripping your breaker, and could explain why it used to work before, but doesn’t now…. things have solidified since the last time

when i opened my motor, there was sawdust everywhere, and even the power switch was encased in a block of compressed sawdust in a perfect molded shape of the switch’s innards; MrUnix’s photo shows how mine came (used from Craigslist)

$25 for the saw and a new bearing later, and everythings fine now

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#13 posted 04-23-2018 01:21 PM

Thanks, davezedlee…good work & photos!
Mine doesn’t have a fraction of that sawdust
buildup. Your problem was the rear bearing
& was a puller required! Any substitute tool?
Not a cheapskate, but if costly I may have
no future use for it. Are there loaners…and
where buy parts? online eBay, Amazon?

-- Paul, Tennessee

View davezedlee's profile

davezedlee

29 posts in 904 days


#14 posted 04-23-2018 11:26 PM

the rear bearing fits inside a plastic “cup” that then presses into the frame of the motor… if you’re lucky, that cup hasn’t melted at all

you WILL need some sort of bearing puller… the two arms on mine were actually too thick to fit in the small space between the bearing and commutator, so i had to improvise using the two “L” brackets in the photo

luckily i had this puller from when i replaced the bearings in a Craftsman router about five years ago; it was only $15 or so, and because i had it and had replaced bearings before, i knew i could figure out the saw… so, highly recommended

a 6200-2RS (10×30x9mm) bearing is a pretty common size; i didn’t replace the front bearing, mostly because i couldn’t figure out how to get at it

but the saw works fine

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Hugh37

13 posts in 115 days


#15 posted 04-24-2018 11:40 AM

davezedlee…many thanks. I plan to purchase a bearing puller today and attempt the job. Anxious to see
inside the motor casing…expect to find the bearings are bad, then on with ordering replacements.

-- Paul, Tennessee

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