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Forum topic by ScottM posted 04-20-2018 03:16 PM 757 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ScottM

662 posts in 2231 days


04-20-2018 03:16 PM

I’ve been watching a few YouTube videos and noticed the use of battery powered trim routers. I take every use of tools in those videos with a grain of salt because I know most everything you see in them was given to them or provided as sponsorship.

So on to the question. I’m in the market for a trim router and wanted to know if anyone actually uses one of the battery powered ones and, if so, how you like it.

Next question would be what are the recommendations for plug in models for trim routers?


19 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

1960 posts in 1891 days


#1 posted 04-20-2018 03:22 PM

Yes, have a Ryobi and works great for a quick round over or beveled edge, doubt I would do any real edge shaping with it. Come to think of it have used it on some occasions to route a groove for shelving and works fantastic for inlays.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5737 posts in 2898 days


#2 posted 04-20-2018 03:25 PM

Nope. No battery operated routers here. The first version I saw years ago, a Porter Cable I think, made me laugh it was so huge.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

662 posts in 2231 days


#3 posted 04-20-2018 03:26 PM



Yes, have a Ryobi and works great for a quick round over or beveled edge, doubt I would do any real edge shaping with it. Come to think of it have used it on some occasions to route a groove for shelving and works fantastic for inlays.

- Andre

Another question, what kind of battery life do they have?

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1114 posts in 3379 days


#4 posted 04-20-2018 03:32 PM

I have looked into the Rigid (already have batteries) since most of the time it is a quick use. The unwinding cord, running cord from outlet and rewinding the cord sometimes takes longer than the work. Snapping a battery on seems like it would save a lot of time.
Steve.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4355 posts in 797 days


#5 posted 04-20-2018 03:48 PM

I just love my 7310 :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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ChefHDAN

1097 posts in 2934 days


#6 posted 04-20-2018 04:24 PM

I will only have battery operated drills and drivers. The costs for replacing batteries is wasteful in my uses, and does not make any logical sense, since I have ample power and outlets in my shop. If I were doing a lot of final edge finishing in the field for profit where time is money it could make more sense. I’ve got the Dewalt 611 combo trim kit & it’s a great addition forr when I only need to run a 1/4” shank bit hand held.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Charles Holland's profile

Charles Holland

81 posts in 781 days


#7 posted 04-20-2018 06:15 PM

I didn’t like the Ryobi but it was the handheld portion I hated. I want a Makita.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3733 days


#8 posted 04-20-2018 06:26 PM

I have a little Makita that was sent to me to review
and I like it. I don’t know if I’d pony up to buy
the battery kit, but it is real quick to get going
with. Especially on trimming long edges a cord
can hang up and you have to constantly be aware
of what the cord is going to do. I’ve sometimes
thrown it over my shoulder. With the battery
router I don’t have to think about the cord at all.

Even with two batteries if you’re doing a lot of
trimming there’s likely to be some downtime
for charging.

The collet on the Makita is much easier and quicker
to change bits in than my old Porter-Cable, but
I chalk that up to general progress in router
designs.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

807 posts in 1669 days


#9 posted 04-20-2018 06:28 PM

Regarding trim routers -
I really like my Ridgid corded unit. I also want the corded Makita package that has the plunge base for the trim router. I can use two in order to keep different bits. Now that I am familiar with the Makita set up, I might say that is the better choice, but I got the Ridgid first, and I do like it a lot.

I do not ever do any woodwork operations with routers when I would be so rushed that I would find plugging in a tool to be a problem.

On the other hand I freely acknowledge that I do greatly enjoy my two cordless tool collections: Dewalt 20v and Milwaukee 12v. Its great to grab and go to drive a screw or remove one. I break down plywood with the 20v circular saw. I grab the 12v hacksaw for quick trimming jobs.
No routers in either system, though.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Andre's profile

Andre

1960 posts in 1891 days


#10 posted 04-20-2018 06:41 PM


Yes, have a Ryobi and works great for a quick round over or beveled edge, doubt I would do any real edge shaping with it. Come to think of it have used it on some occasions to route a groove for shelving and works fantastic for inlays.

- Andre

Another question, what kind of battery life do they have?

- ScottM

Guess if I turned it on and it was in constant use, depending on age of battery 30 to 60 min. edging and a little less if cutting grooves. I Have 5 or 6 batteries so always have a charged one ready, when using the cordless hand sander and it is a bigger job will use the Hi-capacity battery. for longer run time but also double the size.
For the price you can not beat the value of the ryobi, that said they are ideal for the hobby woodworker!
Started to get some Ridgid tools, cordless included and so far very impressed just not with some of there prices compared to Ryobi, will have to see how the lifetime warranty works for the batteries but with the little actual use they get and my so so memory, doubt it will ever be tested.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1787 posts in 2074 days


#11 posted 04-20-2018 08:18 PM

No batteries except drills and drivers. Had too many other battery tools that were useless after a few years and needed obsolete expensive batteries. My 30 yr old plug in tools still work when needed, like as a back up.

As for plug in trim routers, define your expectations. HF has a pretty good cheap one that handles actual trim routing well, and some other light duty edge treatment. If you want more capability you start getting into mini plunge routers and such and a lot more $. Just depends on where you want the tool to fit in.

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

670 posts in 625 days


#12 posted 04-20-2018 08:33 PM

I have Ridgid Trim Router Model #24012. My Ridgid replaced an old Porter Cable trim router I had. I love my new Ridgid trim router. I do’t think I would get a battery operated one. Fidgiting around with a cord or a battery….I’m going with the cord on this particular tool.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-5-5-Amp-Corded-Compact-Router-R24012/100337039

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

662 posts in 2231 days


#13 posted 04-20-2018 11:43 PM



I have Ridgid Trim Router Model #24012. My Ridgid replaced an old Porter Cable trim router I had. I love my new Ridgid trim router. I do t think I would get a battery operated one. Fidgiting around with a cord or a battery….I m going with the cord on this particular tool.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-5-5-Amp-Corded-Compact-Router-R24012/100337039

- Kelster58

I think I am going to go with this one. The battery ones are more and you only get one battery. I also looked at the Makita. Same price but no bag and just a single base is included. I’ll go by HD tomorrow and put my hands on them. Thanks all for the info and opinions.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

420 posts in 287 days


#14 posted 04-21-2018 01:08 PM

we have a plethora of trim routers, seems each truck has a different brand, we use them for door hanging, well mostly for quick jobs where we don’t have to pull out the jig, ect. we have made some plexi plates that work well with mortising strike plates and other misc. items. You still have to chisel fine tuning the mortise, but the bulk is gone.
tried a couple battery units, and well most of the guys hated them, seems battery life was issue, and power,
So i buy what ever is on sale, while they seem to last forever, the base controls don’t, have tried mulitiple attempts to repair, and makeshift clamps, but the factory one is best. and trying to order a base is well, like buying a new one dang near.

priices are way down from what they were years ago, i have a ryobi i’ve had for almost 15 years, it does all my round over in the shop, and still going strong.
good luck with it
Rj

View Andre's profile

Andre

1960 posts in 1891 days


#15 posted 04-21-2018 10:06 PM


I have Ridgid Trim Router Model #24012. My Ridgid replaced an old Porter Cable trim router I had. I love my new Ridgid trim router. I do t think I would get a battery operated one. Fidgiting around with a cord or a battery….I m going with the cord on this particular tool.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-5-5-Amp-Corded-Compact-Router-R24012/100337039

- Kelster58

I think I am going to go with this one. The battery ones are more and you only get one battery. I also looked at the Makita. Same price but no bag and just a single base is included. I ll go by HD tomorrow and put my hands on them. Thanks all for the info and opinions.

- ScottM

Good choice,I also have this one and it’s big brother, can’t pass up a good deal !
The Ridgid Trim Router Model #24012 has plenty of power for most jobs and a very user friendly adjustment system. Picked up the big brother after my 20 year old Ryobi(corded) died and the combo plunge base made the choice easy.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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