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Wiring a plug on a 220V Grizzly Dust Collector?

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Forum topic by MTL55413 posted 04-19-2018 06:42 PM 5858 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MTL55413

2 posts in 156 days


04-19-2018 06:42 PM

Hi All -

Thomas from the Minnesota Tool Library here. Thanks in advance for any help that can be offered!

Curious if anyone has any experience wiring a plug on to a Grizzly 2HP Dust Collector (or similar)?

Grizzly manufactures for a hard-wiring, but we’re wanting the flexibility of a plug & cord. Any thoughts…hard to do, not advisable??

Here’s the listing:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/2-HP-Cyclone-Dust-Collector/G0440?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsoqn_Yew2gIVhD2BCh1KRgU7EAkYCyABEgIiVPD_BwE


17 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6889 posts in 2318 days


#1 posted 04-19-2018 06:51 PM

It’s just a 2hp 14A@240V machine, so there is no reason why you can’t put a plug on it and use a standard 20A outlet… in fact, the page you point to shows, under the ‘accessories and related items’ section, a plug you can purchase from them for the job:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

401 posts in 1526 days


#2 posted 04-19-2018 07:31 PM

Unless you’re installing it as a mobile unit I recommend hard wiring, I would hope you’re connecting it to hard duct so it’s not going to be moved much. But like Brad said of course you can use a 20a receptacle and plug, or a 20a twist lock.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

145 posts in 649 days


#3 posted 04-19-2018 07:47 PM



Unless you re installing it as a mobile unit I recommend hard wiring, I would hope you re connecting it to hard duct so it s not going to be moved much. But like Brad said of course you can use a 20a receptacle and plug, or a 20a twist lock.

- GrantA

I have to disagree. Dust collectors can sometimes get clogged. Unplugging the unit for maintenance is %100 sure way you know there is no chance of it turning on.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5069 posts in 2612 days


#4 posted 04-19-2018 08:40 PM

Grizzly sometimes goes off the deep end with the electrical specs on their stuff. As said above, just get a 20A/240V plug (the straight blade one is technically a Nema 6-20).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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GrantA

401 posts in 1526 days


#5 posted 04-19-2018 09:41 PM

Killing the breaker (dedicated circuit I hope) is another route. By all means run a cord though, you may need to plug in something ever one day and you’ll have a receptacle to use

Unless you re installing it as a mobile unit I recommend hard wiring, I would hope you re connecting it to hard duct so it s not going to be moved much. But like Brad said of course you can use a 20a receptacle and plug, or a 20a twist lock.

- GrantA

I have to disagree. Dust collectors can sometimes get clogged. Unplugging the unit for maintenance is %100 sure way you know there is no chance of it turning on.

- RobHannon


View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

83 posts in 298 days


#6 posted 04-20-2018 03:43 AM

For me, i pay an electrician. Even though, you could probably figure it out, they think differently.

When i have electrical work done, they offer advice on what to do, and they are thinking differently than you. You just want you dc up so you dont have to sweep so much. They see the room and what could potentially be.

In the long run, its been cheaper for me to hire a pro.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5069 posts in 2612 days


#7 posted 04-20-2018 10:51 AM

You would hire an electrician just to put on a plug? I wouldn’t be able to find one to do that, they usually want larger jobs.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

302 posts in 2039 days


#8 posted 04-20-2018 10:58 AM



You would hire an electrician just to put on a plug? I wouldn t be able to find one to do that, they usually want larger jobs.

- Fred Hargis

Service all $125 thanks see ya!

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

83 posts in 298 days


#9 posted 04-21-2018 02:58 AM

Well, I have to drive 30 minutes to get a plug, or 5 minutes to my electrician who has a corporate office in my home town.

So what I would do if it was just a plug, would be to throw it on back of my truck, take it there and be done quicker than if i went to buy the part. and I know its done right because they wired my shop.

If it was a plug and doing something in the shop as well? Forget about it. I would have them come do it all.

Funny thing is I just went through this. I recently built a new shop, and I got my DC changed over, but never got my hinge press going. And I was needing it. Took it there and they had the part, put it on, and I was back in the shop in 20 minutes. Think I paid 65$. Saving time and knowing its done right was well worth the money.

If it was a Sunday and I was desperate, I could figure it out. just dont like to.

View d38's profile

d38

104 posts in 381 days


#10 posted 04-21-2018 02:54 PM

If it were in my shop, I’d install a 220V outlet, and put a plug on the end of the wire. 220V has several plug choices, so choose whats best for your situation.
Some manufacturers do not put a plug on the 220V equipment because there are so many choices – twist lock, etc. So they ship with a bare wire, and let us attach a plug that matches our receptacle.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1048 posts in 1680 days


#11 posted 04-21-2018 03:21 PM



If it were in my shop, I d install a 220V outlet, and put a plug on the end of the wire. 220V has several plug choices, so choose whats best for your situation.
Some manufacturers do not put a plug on the 220V equipment because there are so many choices – twist lock, etc. So they ship with a bare wire, and let us attach a plug that matches our receptacle.

- d38

You need to install a 250V outlet since normal US voltage is 240V. There’s no such thing as a 220V plug and outlet.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2073 posts in 3063 days


#12 posted 04-22-2018 04:16 AM

but it’s a common term (220), even to those of us who have been around it for decades.

You need to install a 250V outlet since normal US voltage is 240V. There s no such thing as a 220V plug and outlet.

- WhyMe


View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2073 posts in 3063 days


#13 posted 04-22-2018 04:20 AM

That’s true, but it doesn’t mean they are always right. Three have told me I only needed a 100 amp panel, instead of the 200 I installed. Now, with HVAC, two three horse collectors, twenty lights, a stereo, my cabinet saw and sanders and a couple buddies in the shop with me, it’s nice to know I haven’t maxed the system.

In other words, two of my electrician friends seem obsessed with code minimums to the exclusion of potential future growth and uses.

Meanwhile’ four of my “220” toys have plug-ins.

When i have electrical work done, they offer advice on what to do, and they are thinking differently than you. You just want you dc up so you dont have to sweep so much. They see the room and what could potentially be.

- CWWoodworking


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CWWoodworking

83 posts in 298 days


#14 posted 04-23-2018 03:30 AM

Kelly,

My electrician has about 150 employees. they wire hospitals, factories, etc. They are ALWAYS thinking down the road because they know its a PITA to do it later. In other words, they would never under spec something.

If you have electricians that recommend the minimums in a woodworking shop(100 amp panel?) you need to find a different electrician.

I dont do ANY electrical work and know that 100 panel isnt enough. That is just simple math.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2073 posts in 3063 days


#15 posted 04-23-2018 05:42 AM

Electricians are like every other profession, you have your good and your bad. You have parrots and thinkers. You have parroting thinkers. You have code minimalists and so on. Then there is that you are limited to who is available (e.g., it’s an hour to civilization from where I live).

It would be impossible to count the number of houses with 14 gauge wire feeding outlets. In fact, in one woodworking forum post, a guy hired an electrician to add circuits to his shop and, only after talking with a bunch of us did he learn his electrician was a licensed idiot. He installed all fourteen gauge outlet circuits in the guy’s shop.

I’m fortunate in that I played marine electrician (PSNS Shop 51), before moving on to Keyport, Wash., where I played in electronics. My background compelled me to ignore the “good advice” of the experts who presumed to know what I needed, without knowing what I needed.

I had opportunity to visit one electrician’s newly remodeled house. While mine has circuits everywhere (six in the kitchen alone) to avoid tripping fridges, freezers and so on, his has no more than, absolutely, necessary. Said another way, the mechanics car needs work.

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