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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 04-19-2018 04:20 AM 579 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

423 posts in 1333 days


04-19-2018 04:20 AM

I inherited a bunch of tools from my Grandpa and some of them I have no idea what they are used for and they don’t have model or part numbers on them. Except for one and all it says is Veritas.

Also, I got 3 (what I assume are whetstones… How do I tell what grit they are? All three feel pretty much the same.

The Veritas is the brown sliding stick.

This is a rule that just says Incra not sure if it had a specific application?

Here are the 3 stones.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF


14 replies so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

4562 posts in 2409 days


#1 posted 04-19-2018 04:31 AM

Top one, the square looking thing is a corner chisel. Have no idea the brand but here is a link with a description. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milescraft-Corner-Chisel-22200003/300534121?cm_mmc=[*Campaign*]|[*CampaignID*]|[*AdgroupID*]|[*TrackerID*]

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10401 posts in 3648 days


#2 posted 04-19-2018 04:54 AM

corner chisel, plastic router table insert?,
weird metal thing, Veritas bar gauge heads.

The white water stones are often around 6000
grit. The colors of the clay they use to bind
the abrasives are arbitrary and vary from maker
to maker. Measure them to see if they are in
inches or metric. I have a Norton one made
for the American market that’s 8” x 3”. I have
smaller Japanese ones but I’ve never measured
them.

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

423 posts in 1333 days


#3 posted 04-19-2018 05:03 AM

Thank you all. The weird metal thing is some sort of cutter. IDK if that helps.

My grandpa even had what I think is a moulder bit…. But to my knowledge never owned a moulder.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1062 posts in 2849 days


#4 posted 04-19-2018 10:52 AM

The round cheese grater looking tool is a rotating Micro Plane used for rough shaping wood. Usually in a drillpress, but in some applications it’s done by hand. Check the Micro Plane site here Ironically, they were first developed for woodworking and then somebody tried one on cheese and discovered they work wonderfully in the kitchen.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

423 posts in 1333 days


#5 posted 04-19-2018 02:41 PM

Wow I would have thought it was the other way around. Haha

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View Chad_B's profile

Chad_B

24 posts in 400 days


#6 posted 04-30-2018 03:05 PM

those stones are Japanese water stones, prob 5-6k grit.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1095 posts in 2035 days


#7 posted 04-30-2018 04:13 PM

Give us a better close-up shot of the “weird metal thing”.
Where’s the blade? Inside the hole?

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

264 posts in 1494 days


#8 posted 04-30-2018 04:44 PM

Most mfg color code their water stones. Problem is they all use different colors.
Two darker colored water stones appear to have pores loaded with scarf from last use?
Will be easier to determine approximate grit on each one after you have cleaned/leveled to create a fresh cutting surface.

One way to grade them is use a course diamond plate and flatten each one (after a 5 min soak). With a fresh surface, differences in grit will be more obvious. Some people can also rub the scarf left behind from flattening between fingers and feel differences in grit size.
If you can not feel any difference, grab a sharp chisel and scrub it across each one starting with roughest one. With a magnifier you will see differences in sizes of scratches left behind easier than attempting to stare at stones. With trial and error, can also learn which stone removes scratches from previous one and determine order of grit sizes, if you can not determine actual size.

If you do not have diamond flattening stone, then rub them against each other to flatten/clean after a soak. The course stone will easily remove material from higher grits. The higher grits will not cut a courser stone quickly, and actually lose more material than course stone.

Best site I know of that has many brands of Japanese water stones to help with color identification is tools from japan

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

373 posts in 1090 days


#9 posted 04-30-2018 05:24 PM

View BikerDad's profile

BikerDad

347 posts in 3601 days


#10 posted 05-01-2018 05:16 PM

The box of Porter-Cable doohickeys are router template collars. The Incra beastie is some sort of centering “rule”, I would contact them to determine which of their jigs it goes to, because it’s not a normal Incra ruler.

-- I'm happier than a tornado in a trailer park! Grace & Peace.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1965 posts in 1387 days


#11 posted 05-01-2018 05:27 PM

The Incra rule looks like it might have come off of one of their other tools. Any other Incra tools that might be missing its gauge?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

5014 posts in 1138 days


#12 posted 05-01-2018 05:43 PM

The cheese grater looking thing looks like it may be the love child of a rasp and a sanding drum that goes in a drill press?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

423 posts in 1333 days


#13 posted 05-01-2018 05:45 PM

Thank you all for the help. And I think there is an incra jig in there somewhere I will have to dig it out.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1965 posts in 1387 days


#14 posted 05-01-2018 05:53 PM



The cheese grater looking thing looks like it may be the love child of a rasp and a sanding drum that goes in a drill press?

- HokieKen

I have a set of the regular Microplane rasps and they are great. They leave a much smoother finish than a regular rasp but remove material just as fast. The one above for the drill press has always looked like it is designed for bloody knuckles so I haven’t tried one.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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