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tips for miters on the table saw?

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Forum topic by jamsomito posted 04-17-2018 02:48 AM 405 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jamsomito

132 posts in 395 days


04-17-2018 02:48 AM

I’m making little shelves, basically like a picture frame, and I’m trying my hand at miters on the table saw. I find that the blade puts enough pressure on the workpiece that it moves on me slightly mid-cut and I’m left with a concave surface, or one that’s just generally off, on the miter. I didn’t want to clamp the piece to my makeshift fence because I had so many to do. I didn’t think of clamping a stop on, but maybe that would have solved the problem. Any other tips?

Here’s my setup.


11 replies so far

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woodbutcherbynight

4354 posts in 2378 days


#1 posted 04-17-2018 03:03 AM

Make a miter cutting jig. Sure you spend some time doing so but when you need to do this same task again it is already done, very accurate and ready to go. Plenty of designs here and on the web. Here is mine and since making it I have had great success doing all kinds of projects.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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gizmodyne

1777 posts in 4059 days


#2 posted 04-17-2018 03:12 AM

Even a simple board screwed to the miter table with a stop block on it would provide more consistent results. Cut one end first on all of the boards and then put on stop block and cut again. Check it out: http://www.finewoodworking.com/2006/07/01/shopmade-fence-for-a-miter-gauge

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

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gizmodyne

1777 posts in 4059 days


#3 posted 04-17-2018 03:14 AM

Even a simple board screwed to the miter table with a stop block on it would provide more consistent results. Cut one end first on all of the boards and then put on stop block and cut again. Check it out:http://www.finewoodworking.com/2006/07/01/shopmade-fence-for-a-miter-gauge

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

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John Smith

723 posts in 131 days


#4 posted 04-17-2018 12:50 PM

just as Gizmo described: a 1×3 board screwed to the miter gauge and rough sandpaper glued to the board
will eliminate slippage…... I used to make shadow boxes and got tired of the slippage just as you are.

good luck in your projects !!

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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BFamous

92 posts in 89 days


#5 posted 04-18-2018 01:12 AM

+1 for the miter cutting sled vote if you plan on doing this again in the future.
Though the board screwed to the miter gauge comes in a close second…

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

#6 posted 04-18-2018 09:55 AM

I hope this could help you.

How to Use a Meter Gage
https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/miter-gauge-square-angled-cross-cutting-3537017

-- hornibrookstoolsandfasteners

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JBrow

1350 posts in 889 days


#7 posted 04-18-2018 11:34 AM

jamsomito,

I like to use a flat straight fence screwed to the mitre gauge. As John suggested, it has 120 grit sandpaper glued to the mitre gauge fence along its entire length. The fence is long enough on the blade side so that the end of the fence is cut away by the first cut, creating a zero clearance edge where the mitre gauge fence, set at 45 degrees, intersects the blade. The zero clearance edge will help reduce any tear out. The opposite end of the fence is long enough so that a stop block can be clamped to the fence.

A stop block allows duplicate pieces to be cut to the same length. The stop block is a piece of scrap material that features two parallel edges and ends cut square to the edges. The stop block is elevated off the table by installing it so that it rests flat on a piece of ¼” material (such as hardboard or plywood) placed on the table saw table. The ¼” material must lay perfectly flat on the surface when the stop block is clamped in place. The ¼” material is removed; creating a relief zone for saw dust which keeps saw dust from accumulating between the stop block and the work piece.

Before the table saw blade is raised, I like to use a speed square set against the table saw fence and the mitre gauge fence to set mitre gauge fence to 45 degrees. With proper orientation of the work pieces, all mitres can be cut with the same set up. My preference is to test the set-up by using it to cut four test pieces and ensuring that the mitres all close when the test piece joints are all brought together.

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Lazyman

1891 posts in 1356 days


#8 posted 04-18-2018 11:36 AM

As mentioned, attaching a fence to your MG that extends past the blade will make the cut better and safer. It is possible that the miter gauge is a little bit off. First, check that it cuts a perfect 90 by cutting and then flipping one side of the cut. Check to make sure that the runner has no play and make any adjustments that are necessary. If none of that helps, you might look into making a miter sled. William Ng has a good video on dialing the sled in to perfect.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgVthkUE4AU
You could also cut the length slightly long and use a shooting board to get the 45 perfect with a plane.
https://www.popularwoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/ShootingBoard2.pdf

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

132 posts in 395 days


#9 posted 04-18-2018 01:08 PM

lol, guys, I have a board/fence on the miter guage already :) Used the 5-cut method to square up the 90 stop, did the best I could from there with my combo square to get 45. That’s not the issue. The piece moves on me mid-cut is all. Sounds like some sandpaper on the board and/or a stop would solve the problem.

I’d love to make a sled but that’s a project for another day. It’s on the long list of shop improvements I’m trying to do in between projects.

Thanks for the help!

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

151 posts in 619 days


#10 posted 04-18-2018 02:05 PM

For that cut I would tilt the blade 45 and put the miter gauge in the right slot to push the piece through the cut.
The miter gauge will have to be exactly 90
.
Use the rip fence on the saw (with a small spacer block) to make sure each opposite piece is the exact same length.

-- Regards, Charlie --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

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Charlie H.

151 posts in 619 days


#11 posted 04-18-2018 02:08 PM

It’s weird how the text sometimes comes out partially bold.

-- Regards, Charlie --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

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