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how to cover up a small knot hole

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Forum topic by Pabs posted 04-16-2018 01:14 PM 763 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

236 posts in 3422 days


04-16-2018 01:14 PM

Hi all

I’ve been searching for a good solution and having a hard time finding the answer. I have a board I’m using on a project that had a knot smack in mid span . Small knot. 1/2” at best.
The board is 4 feet by 5 inches wide and the darn knot is sitting pretty smak in the middle of that board so it’s hard to miss!. I will be leaving this wood natural and covering either wit Tung or poly. It’s cherry wood.

what would be the best way to hide that hole?

thanks

-- Pabs


32 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4688 posts in 2319 days


#1 posted 04-16-2018 01:16 PM

You can’t hide it. Just fill it with epoxy.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View JayT's profile

JayT

5589 posts in 2179 days


#2 posted 04-16-2018 01:19 PM



You can t hide it. Just fill it with epoxy.

- bondogaposis

Yep, and don’t try to make the epoxy look like the cherry because it will never match. I like to tint the epoxy black on those occasions. Make it a feature instead of trying to hide it.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

19754 posts in 2651 days


#3 posted 04-16-2018 01:24 PM

Drill it out enough to install a plug made from the same wood. Plug cutters can cut into the face grain of a piece of scrap that matches the wood. Align the grain as best as you can, and glue the plug in. Plane flush with the surface after the glue dries.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

236 posts in 3422 days


#4 posted 04-16-2018 02:13 PM



Drill it out enough to install a plug made from the same wood. Plug cutters can cut into the face grain of a piece of scrap that matches the wood. Align the grain as best as you can, and glue the plug in. Plane flush with the surface after the glue dries.

- bandit571


I had considered this but was wondering how that would look…would the perfect circle cutout really stand out? I’ve done it with end grain and they obviously really stand out (which is a desired effect in that case) . But if I were to make the plug from face grain then the only obvious thing would be the contour I guess.

-- Pabs

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1001 posts in 1920 days


#5 posted 04-16-2018 02:22 PM

Why not just get another board?

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

236 posts in 3422 days


#6 posted 04-16-2018 02:27 PM



Why not just get another board?

- Kazooman


ha….well, a few reasons. I had done some work to this board before noticing this knot and it’s gonna be something I give away to a friend so rather not waste a full board for something I’m not getting paid for :)

-- Pabs

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4050 posts in 2277 days


#7 posted 04-16-2018 03:10 PM

Trying to hide will most likely make it look worse. Of course it’s hard to tell when all we know its aboard. That’s not a lot of information to go on.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1057 posts in 2818 days


#8 posted 04-16-2018 03:30 PM

Had the same problem with this entertainment center , I increased the depth forgetting that my original width was because of some defects and had to make three heart shaped patches (Dutchmen) to cover (see pics in project).
1) I drew some hearts in sketchup, printed them and used them as a pattern to make a template from 1/4” ply with the heart shapes.
2) Used an inlay kit with the templates to cut out the defect areas
3) removed the bushing spacer, and then cut the outlines in a piece of cherry from the same tree to make the patch.
4)Took the board to the bandsaw and then resawed the patches out

No they’re not perfect and indistinguishable, and I did purposely skew the grain alignments to try to feature the fix rather than hide it.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View mel52's profile

mel52

218 posts in 233 days


#9 posted 04-16-2018 03:33 PM

Let my wife talk to it. When she is done, the board will feel so bad it will fix itself. LOL.

-- MEL, Kansas

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

246 posts in 1462 days


#10 posted 04-16-2018 03:35 PM

+1 = new board. or

+1 = Either drill out the knot or if only one side is displayed: use a router with inlay template guide and circle template and cut 1/2 thickness deep around knot. Then find another board with same grain pattern, and cut out an inlay patch. With careful selection of plug/patch, knot repair can be invisible to everyone except another wood worker.


Drill it out enough to install a plug made from the same wood. Plug cutters can cut into the face grain of a piece of scrap that matches the wood. Align the grain as best as you can, and glue the plug in. Plane flush with the surface after the glue dries.

- bandit571


-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Rich's profile

Rich

2649 posts in 558 days


#11 posted 04-16-2018 03:54 PM

I’d have laid the cuts out to avoid the knot, but if I found myself in a situation like that, I’d use epoxy putty. It comes in various colors that can be mixed, tinted with pigment or dye in order to achieve pretty much any color. I’d fill the knot with it (after testing recipes and allowing them to harden to match the base color of the wood), sand it smooth and then use Prismacolor pencils to match the surrounding wood.

I keep thirty or so pencils in my repair kit in various wood shades and warm greys, etc. They work beautifully on the epoxy and also on Timbermate. You really don’t have to be an artist, the idea is to obscure the edges and give some variation to the overall patch so it doesn’t attract the eye. I use Timbermate to patch worm holes in mesquite and I’ve gotten to where they blend so well, even I can’t find them when I go back and look.

Mohawk Blendal sticks are great too, but since you can go to any art supply store and get pencils for $1.50 apiece, it’s the easier way to go. Take a piece of the wood to the store and pick out three or four colors that will complement the board.

BTW, you don’t just color the patch, you want to go across the edges to obscure them. Use your finger to soften/blend the pencil lines.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2884 posts in 1449 days


#12 posted 04-16-2018 04:02 PM

Fill with epoxy but best to tint to match color.

I generally use artists acrylic paint.

You’ll probably be surprised ;-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

207 posts in 1889 days


#13 posted 04-16-2018 05:06 PM

Go buy a silver coin that fits over the hole, buy the year of birth for who you are making it for.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

19754 posts in 2651 days


#14 posted 04-16-2018 05:45 PM


Just pine…...

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1531 posts in 3035 days


#15 posted 04-16-2018 06:24 PM

if you can’t hide it accentuate it! Make a butterfly inlay or bowtie. Me, I’d just shoot it up with cryocyclolate and make it solid and go on. But an inlay would be cool!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

showing 1 through 15 of 32 replies

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