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Water stone / keeping it clean

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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 04-13-2018 02:22 AM 572 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

435 posts in 1382 days


04-13-2018 02:22 AM

Was wondering if some of you all wouldn’t mind showing me your sharpening station setups and ways you keep it clean when using water stones.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF


14 replies so far

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2630 posts in 2932 days


#1 posted 04-13-2018 02:48 AM

I use Ohishi waterstones from Lie Nielson. The advantage is that they only need a spritz of water before use, so no messy soaking. Grits are 1000, 3000, 10000. Also have DMT plates but don’t use them much, mostly just for the occasional aggressive sharpening when I have a chip out of a blade.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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TheFridge

9683 posts in 1535 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 03:19 AM

I leave it open over night to dry after use. Otherwise it stays closed.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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LucasWoods

435 posts in 1382 days


#3 posted 04-15-2018 05:39 AM

Very nice. How messy are waterstones that may need more water? I got about 7 stones most from my grandfather, and haven’t put them to use yet.

I also was given a 12”x12” piece of granite that has a plate on it stating that it has been honed to within .000005” of square. I am assuming this is a block to do sharpening on?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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TheFridge

9683 posts in 1535 days


#4 posted 04-15-2018 05:43 AM

Not sure about the mess. Mine don’t need much water.

You can use that surface plate for sharpening with sandpaper maybe. Other than that it doesn’t have much use besides it’s intended use in metrology or measuring.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3697 days


#5 posted 04-15-2018 06:51 AM

The mess isn’t too awful. When I was using
a 1200 grit stone more often I had a sheet
of finished plywood about 16” square with
a cleat on the bottom to put in my vise. I had
a mitered rim on all four sides about 3/8”
thick. The water pretty much stayed in there
and I would just wipe it off when I was done.
It held up surprisingly well.

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

387 posts in 2426 days


#6 posted 04-15-2018 10:38 AM

I have a Shapton Stone Pond that I use with Ark, JNATS, Diamond, and man made waterstones. The pond and a Tormek keep the mess down.

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

435 posts in 1382 days


#7 posted 04-15-2018 02:03 PM

Thanks for all the ideas! So basically my stone I could attach sandpaper and be able to flatten my stones with it right?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3697 days


#8 posted 04-15-2018 03:49 PM

I use floor sanding screens on a flat surface.

The stones will tend to dish quicker if you don’t
spread wear evenly on the stone. I’ve done
this by hand honing in a figure 8 pattern. The
issue with this is it takes awhile to learn to
not hack up the stones.

Eventually I went over to using a honing guide
with the wheel offset so it rides on the table
in front of the stone. This allows spreading
the wear on the stone and also more pressure
so the stone cuts faster. I’ve always found my
fine stones to glaze quickly so I use a nagura
stone to make a slurry on them which seems
to prevent the glazing. A complication of the
jig I use is that if the stones aren’t all the same
elevation it has to be readjusted to account
for that when switching stones.

This is the system I use. It’s a hassle to get it
all put together but it does work well. https://youtu.be/WO_M95qDdAQ

View Tim's profile

Tim

3812 posts in 2011 days


#9 posted 04-16-2018 05:07 PM



Thanks for all the ideas! So basically my stone I could attach sandpaper and be able to flatten my stones with it right?

- LucasWoods

Does the plate really say within .000005” of square? I’m no machinist, but that sounds unusual so my guess is it’s flat not square, but that sounds like a very high tolerance for flat too. If it is that flat it was a very good surface plate and you probably wouldn’t want to waste it with sandpaper on it. You can use other things that are flat enough for that.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1921 posts in 1855 days


#10 posted 04-16-2018 05:28 PM

Granite Surface Plate from Lee Valley, think I have one somewhere? Buddy gave me a Granite sink cut, much more useable size!

Until now granite surface plates were too expensive for anywhere except machine shops. However, they are very useful in a woodworking shop, particularly for checking plane bottom flatness as well as for lapping planes, using the plate as a bed for PSA-backed paper.
Superb quality, this plate is 2” thick and 9” x 12” overall and weighs 25-3/4 lb. Obviously it is moisture and corrosion proof. It is also accurate to ±0.0001” overall (not 0.001” but 0.0001”).
Excellent buy.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

435 posts in 1382 days


#11 posted 04-16-2018 11:13 PM

Thanks for all the ideas! So basically my stone I could attach sandpaper and be able to flatten my stones with it right?

- LucasWoods

Does the plate really say within .000005” of square? I m no machinist, but that sounds unusual so my guess is it s flat not square, but that sounds like a very high tolerance for flat too. If it is that flat it was a very good surface plate and you probably wouldn t want to waste it with sandpaper on it. You can use other things that are flat enough for that.

- Tim

Yes the plate is 0.000050


-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

435 posts in 1382 days


#12 posted 04-16-2018 11:16 PM

So what would you all say is the best use of something this flat?

Someone mentioned flattening hand plane soles.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2489 posts in 990 days


#13 posted 04-17-2018 12:31 AM

Never posted it as a project, but made this for my stones.

Brownie pan to hold water and catch the swarf and two pieces of teak for the stones to sit on. The frame is cedar.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Tim's profile

Tim

3812 posts in 2011 days


#14 posted 04-18-2018 01:02 PM



So what would you all say is the best use of something this flat?

Someone mentioned flattening hand plane soles.

- LucasWoods

The best use as Fridge mentioned is careful accurate measurements using machinist tools. But those are expensive if you don’t have a specific need for them. You need a flat reference surface to start from to measure accurately. So I wouldn’t use it for flattening, I’d get a granite sink cutout for that, but at 12×12 it’s not super valuable so if you want to stick sandpaper to flatten plane soles, stones, and irons on it feel free.

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