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Flooded Chair Repair

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Forum topic by bilyo posted 04-12-2018 08:07 PM 1000 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bilyo

335 posts in 1248 days


04-12-2018 08:07 PM

I have a child’s maple rocker that was flooded and consequently has considerable joint failure and some minor warping. The worst of it is in the seat where all but one of the joints has failed:

This chair is not an antique. I was factory made probably in the late 60’s by the Nichols Co. in Gardener, Mass. I’m not sure what kind of glue was used, but it must have been water soluble. The next picture shows the edge of one piece:

Notice the whitish area which I think is a glue remnant. Note also the small tongue close to the bottom of the edge. All of the seat joints have this small tongue and groove. Because of some warping, the seat pieces do not fit precisely. Once clamped together, there are remaining gaps in the joints:

Because of the T&G and the shape of the pieces, I cannot easily true up the edges for a better fit. I’m thinking of cleaning up the old glue and then re-gluing with either epoxy or plastic resin and let the squeeze out fill the remaining gaps. My only concern is that I have considerable pressure on the clamps forcing the pieces together as you see in the picture. Am I likely to squeeze out the glue and end up with dry joints? Also, I’m afraid that they may pop apart later.

I should have taken another picture. With just the clamp on the front edge, the joints were open about 1/32” to 1/8” at the back edge.

Your thoughts?


16 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2525 days


#1 posted 04-13-2018 01:16 AM

There have been times where I really cranked down with clamps and the pieces were in one piece years later. Yellow glue is stronger than wood, I don’t see you gaining anything with epoxy.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Aj2

1719 posts in 1943 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 01:42 AM

I would use the seat as a pattern and make a new one.
Seems wrong to force the wood back in shape

-- Aj

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2525 posts in 1532 days


#3 posted 04-13-2018 04:21 PM

After getting all of the glue residue off, I would probably just glue with yellow glue and fill any gaps afterwords with some thin CA like I do when turning badly cracked bowl blanks. If you plan to stain or just varnish it, you might want to mask off surrounding wood to prevent the CA from discoloring the wood.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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fivecodys

1166 posts in 1781 days


#4 posted 04-13-2018 10:35 PM

This is a challenge for sure.

I re-glued one of my bosses oak office chairs back up for him and I found it easier to just take it all apart and then start over. (It was way too easy to pull apart. Bad glue job I think.)

Since it’s not an antique, you might be able to add mechanical fasteners (pocket hole screws?) to the bottom of the seat to assist the glue. Just thinking out loud here.

I do agree with one of the other posters that a new bottle of yellow wood glue is stronger than the wood itself. I say “new bottle” because old glue can be a problem . Long story…...

Please let us know how it all turns out.

Chem

-- I always knew I would grow old, But I expected it to take longer!

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Rick S.

10561 posts in 3178 days


#5 posted 04-14-2018 02:14 AM

NOTE: Dual Same Post! The other one is by ”joseph21” here: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/271145

Explanation is on there.

WHY???

EDIT: It’s posted in 2 different Forums. Maybe that’s why?

Rick

-- (Rick S.)... "Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!"

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bilyo

335 posts in 1248 days


#6 posted 04-14-2018 10:24 PM

I have no idea how that happened. Certainly not intentional. Very strange. I do not have an account as “joseph21”.

I posted this reply in the other forum as well.

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Rick S.

10561 posts in 3178 days


#7 posted 04-15-2018 12:30 AM



I have no idea how that happened. Certainly not intentional. Very strange. I do not have an account as “joseph21”.

I posted this reply in the other forum as well.

- bilyo

Okay. just seems to be a BIG Coincidence. Exact same Posting is in 2 Different Forums.

Don’t get me wrong. I don’t think there are any Rules against that and I have nothing against you, or whoever did that. You would actually get more Coverage that way.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++| This is a Cut & Paste from the other “joseph21” Post.

“A Coincidence?

The difference is that ”bilyo” (the other one) has 161 Posts, has been on here for 1059 Days, is from Mobile Alabama and has a few pictures of the chair on his Post.

This one “joseph21” has 1 Post (this one) and has only been on here for 12 hours as of 9:50 P.M.

EDIT Okay! Same Guy! BOTH Posts have the Identical Lead Ins “I have a child’s maple rocker that was flooded and consequently has considerable joint failure and some minor warping. The worst of it is in the seat where all but one of the joints has failed.”

WHY???

EDIT: #2 It’s Posted in 2 different Forums. Maybe that’s why?
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Water Under The Bridge as far as I’m concerned Bilyo!

Ya’ll have a nice day now!

Regards: Rick

-- (Rick S.)... "Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!"

View jbay's profile

jbay

2674 posts in 1044 days


#8 posted 04-15-2018 12:47 AM

Great information there Rick,
Thanks for clearing all that up.

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10561 posts in 3178 days


#9 posted 04-15-2018 03:30 AM



Great information there Rick,
Thanks for clearing all that up.

- Jbay

Your Welcome Jbay. My Pleasure.

Regards: Rick

-- (Rick S.)... "Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!"

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

335 posts in 1248 days


#10 posted 04-15-2018 01:16 PM



There have been times where I really cranked down with clamps and the pieces were in one piece years later. Yellow glue is stronger than wood, I don t see you gaining anything with epoxy.

- Woodknack

The main advantage I’m considering is that both epoxy and plastic resin will fill the gaps where the seat components no longer fit precisely and still provide strength. Several of the joints have narrow gaps that are hard to see in the photo.

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

335 posts in 1248 days


#11 posted 04-27-2018 07:59 PM

Here is the completed repaired chair:

I didn’t try to make it like new. Due to having been in a flood, the pieces did not fit back together perfectly. So, I glued with System 3 epoxy. After cleaning it up with 4 ought steel wool, I gave it a couple of spray coats of shellac to protect the existing finish and stenciling. It isn’t real pretty, but it is serviceable.

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

79 posts in 389 days


#12 posted 04-28-2018 01:14 AM

Looks good—and most importantly it’s back in service!
Thanks for following up with the outcome, it’s always good to know what someone ended up deciding to do after asking for advice.

View Bishop78's profile

Bishop78

14 posts in 161 days


#13 posted 05-12-2018 09:30 AM

I know you are already done with the project and it looks very nice.

There is another glue option i rarely see used in workshops. If you have to fix a chair due to whatever reason polyurathane glue will do the trick…titebond or other woodglues have an elasticity to them which allows the joints to fail over time. Poly glue doesn´t only solve that problem…it also expands pulling moisture out of the air…if you wet the gluejoint before applying the glue(damp cloth) it will fill all the gaps…and its waterresistant. For chairs perfect.

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

335 posts in 1248 days


#14 posted 05-13-2018 01:10 AM



I know you are already done with the project and it looks very nice.

There is another glue option i rarely see used in workshops. If you have to fix a chair due to whatever reason polyurathane glue will do the trick…titebond or other woodglues have an elasticity to them which allows the joints to fail over time. Poly glue doesn´t only solve that problem…it also expands pulling moisture out of the air…if you wet the gluejoint before applying the glue(damp cloth) it will fill all the gaps…and its waterresistant. For chairs perfect.

- Bishop78


I don’t have a lot of experience with poly glue, but from what I read, it does expand and fill gaps. But, it fills them with glue foam that has very little strength. I needed the gaps to be filled with something structural. Structural epoxy was the only thing I could think of that would do that. Thanks for your comment.

View recon49's profile

recon49

7 posts in 150 days


#15 posted 05-22-2018 06:26 AM

Bilyo that turns out excellent. Great to see some good tips on here.

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