LumberJocks

Setting up Delta 34-806 Unisaw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by redham posted 04-06-2018 02:47 PM 1137 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


04-06-2018 02:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta unisaw phase 3 restoration biesmeyer

Need help restoring and wiring a 3phase Unisaw

I just bought a Delta Unisaw 34-806 at a pretty good price from a guy who was moving out of a shop. The shop was owned by a cabinet maker prior to him so the saw was already setup when he moved in. The Unisaw is 1995ish model with a 5HP 3phase motor, Biesemeyer Fence on a 53inch extension (I think, total length is of rails is 8 feet), Aluminum roller out feed that is foldable.

Here are the stages with I processing on this refurb project:

1. Rebuild the Biesemeyer fence system a. replacing the wood on the fence b. Strip the paint from the rails c. Prime/repaint the fence and rails d. Rebuild the wood fence

Should I use a chemical stripping agent or grinder to remove the old paint?

2. Main body a. clean up saw case b. Build a new motor cover/switch mount

3. Electrical – the Hardest part a. Wire a VFD

The original owner wired a Nema Size 2 Mag switch and somehow wired a 220 plug to the side of the switch. He had old Dust collector plugged there which trigged the collector on when he had the saw on. This the part that confuses me because the motor on the DC is a 1hp, 1 phase motor. How is this is possible?

I have to figure this part out first before I can look into the VFD part.

Should I be looking a 5HP VFD or a higher 7.5HD one? I dont plan on getting any other 3 phase machines.

I am complete noob with electrical work. I decided to go the VFD route because it is the easiest “plug and play” and cost efficient solution for me. I will be relying on my dad for help in doing the actual electrical work because he is done electrical work before. Unfortunately he is not familiar with VFD’s or Phase Converters.

As mentioned above part of this acquisition was old drum base DC with a 1HP motor and an old Rockwell 43-340 which has the same, but broken, Nema Size 2 switch. It is unknown if the motor is good or not but I thinking that I can salvage the cast iron top and sell/scrap the motor and guts. I am also not planning on keeping the DC since I already have 110 one.

This going to be install in a home garage with electrical panel that is rated up to 60amps

Any help would be appreciated.


35 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#1 posted 04-06-2018 06:05 PM

Electrical is the easiest. Hardest part is trying to figure out where to mount the VFD. Size it based on FLA, not HP – post a picture of the motor data plate.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#2 posted 04-06-2018 10:53 PM

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#3 posted 04-08-2018 03:59 AM



Electrical is the easiest. Hardest part is trying to figure out where to mount the VFD. Size it based on FLA, not HP – post a picture of the motor data plate.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

There seems to be some decently priced Leeson motors on ebay. Swap out maybe an option as well.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Leeson-120554-00-5-Hp-3450-Rpm-Electric-Motor-1-Ph-230-Volt-Fits-Air-Compressor/111653712803?epid=1524616527&hash=item19ff1473a3:g:ljUAAOSwupRaxj76

It’s a compressor motor, not sure if that matters

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#4 posted 04-08-2018 06:07 AM

Swapping out the motor will be more of a hassle and cost more than just slapping a VFD on it. The Leeson motor mentioned above won’t work as it doesn’t have the correct mount – Unisaw motors have a specific mount and is different depending on if it’s left or right tilt. You may get lucky and find a unisaw specific single phase motor for fairly cheap, but then you will also have to address the overload protection in the starter – finding the correct sized heaters for the new motor as the existing ones will almost certainly be the wrong size.

The motor shown has a FLA of 12A, so you could get by with a ‘3hp’ vfd, such as the TECO L510-203 sensorless vector drive for about $200, or a FM50-203 V/Hz drive for slightly less. The drive can provide a sustained 10.5A and the motor will rarely, if ever, see FLA. The VFD can also sustain up to 150% rated current for something like 30 seconds if you ever do push it to it’s limit. There are lots of people running those VFD’s on 5hp machines without any issues (eg: See this thread at OWWM). And since the starter on the machine will no longer be needed, it can be sold to recover some or all of the cost of the VFD, reducing your overall costs even more.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#5 posted 04-08-2018 06:15 PM

Thank you for your help Brad.

I evaluated the VFD option based on the requirement for a 5HP VFD unit which was going to be priced around $500+. All of the threads I can across were based on 3hp 3phase motors using a 3hp motor. Since a 3HP VFD would suffice in this case it changes the economics entirely.

When I came across the leeson motor I figured a unisaw mount adapter and starter would bring it around $400. My last option was going to with the Grizzly (Unisaw mount) motor.

I have read that the Teco VFD is a “Plug & Play” solution. Is this as simple as disconnecting the exiting NEMA 2 starter, reconnecting the 3 leads from the Teco and then running the 220 cord to the outlet?


Swapping out the motor will be more of a hassle and cost more than just slapping a VFD on it. The Leeson motor mentioned above won t work as it doesn t have the correct mount – Unisaw motors have a specific mount and is different depending on if it s left or right tilt. You may get lucky and find a unisaw specific single phase motor for fairly cheap, but then you will also have to address the overload protection in the starter – finding the correct sized heaters for the new motor as the existing ones will almost certainly be the wrong size.

The motor shown has a FLA of 12A, so you could get by with a 3hp vfd, such as the TECO L510-203 sensorless vector drive for about $200, or a FM50-203 V/Hz drive for slightly less. The drive can provide a sustained 10.5A and the motor will rarely, if ever, see FLA. The VFD can also sustain up to 150% rated current for something like 30 seconds if you ever do push it to it s limit. There are lots of people running those VFD s on 5hp machines without any issues (eg: See this thread at OWWM). And since the starter on the machine will no longer be needed, it can be sold to recover some or all of the cost of the VFD, reducing your overall costs even more.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#6 posted 04-08-2018 08:34 PM

I have read that the Teco VFD is a “Plug & Play” solution. Is this as simple as disconnecting the exiting NEMA 2 starter, reconnecting the 3 leads from the Teco and then running the 220 cord to the outlet?
- redham

That’s basically it… as mentioned, the hardest part of using a VFD is figuring out where to mount it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#7 posted 04-09-2018 12:56 AM

I assume I can add an emergency switch in between the outlet to the VFD. I would like to have some kind of emergency “bump” shutoff.

Edit: Just found a vid by someone who did the same setup on a drill press. A cut off switch didn’t make the drill come to a stop, it was a very slow wind down because the VFD wind down in frequency.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#8 posted 04-09-2018 01:56 AM

I assume I can add an emergency switch in between the outlet to the VFD. I would like to have some kind of emergency “bump” shutoff.

Edit: Just found a vid by someone who did the same setup on a drill press. A cut off switch didn t make the drill come to a stop, it was a very slow wind down because the VFD wind down in frequency.
- redham

Killing power to the VFD won’t do much in the way of an emergency stop (most will keep running for a while even during a power fail). However, the VFD itself has an emergency stop feature that can be used for that purpose.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Macrosill's profile

Macrosill

15 posts in 631 days


#9 posted 04-11-2018 04:30 PM

I have the same saw on a mobile base. I have a 52” unifence. I installed a VFD and love the saw.

You can read about my VFD adventure at https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?248290-Table-saw-advice

-- Thanks, Brian

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#10 posted 05-02-2018 03:47 AM

Now that I got the fence issue out of the way. I was able to move forward and mount the new side motor cover which then allows me to look for a mounting position for the VFD.

I made a mount for the VFD so that the panel will be flush with the fence rail. The mount is just box with an open bottom for the wiring. My main concern is accidentally bumping the VFD, which is why I made it a three sided. I opened up 2 1.5” holes on the top for venting.

Since I have never used a VFD I don’t know how hot it will get. Do I need the port the top of the sides as well?

I would like to mount the my new cutoff paddle switch on the left side of the VFD mount but it looks like it will too close to the elevator crank.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#11 posted 05-02-2018 05:48 AM

There are minimum clearance measurements in the VFD manual, and you should have it so that air can flow from bottom to top (the VFD will most likely have a fan on top to help with that). It should not get that hot unless you use the machine for an extended period of time – usually not much of a concern for home/hobby use. If you are concerned, then you should mount it to a metal surface and perhaps mount a circulating fan (should also be discussed in the manual).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#12 posted 05-05-2018 09:34 PM

Update:

Mounted the and wired the VFD. Had to fiddle with depth to make sure it was flush with rail. I also installed a switch box for the cut off paddle switch.

The paddle switch is a Powertech switch. What is the best wiring config to the VFD as, I understand, I will have to program the VFD later to understand the wiring?

also, do I need a cover plate for the box I used to mount the power lines through?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6848 posts in 2285 days


#13 posted 05-05-2018 09:47 PM

That looks like you have seriously restricted the air flow… manual recommends ~2” on each side and ~4.75” on top, and that is when using an aux. fan for cooling. As for covering wiring – that is always a good idea. You certainly don’t want anything accidentally coming in contact with a live 240v wire.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#14 posted 05-06-2018 01:39 AM

gaah. I did reference the manual. Somehow I miscalculated the mount and didn’t even realize it with all the other stuff going on.

I will rebuild a mount.

The pain of all this is that I will probably not keep this saw.

View redham's profile

redham

37 posts in 536 days


#15 posted 05-07-2018 03:48 AM

Mount 2.0

Built a new mount. I guess didn’t compensate 1.5” loss for the sides. There is clearance 2” on each side and this time I left the top open since it is mounted under the saw top anyway for airflow. Extended the height of the mount plate to accommodate the cable mounting box. The bottom half of the VFD will be covered so there will be no exposed wires.

How should wire the paddle switch to the VFD?

showing 1 through 15 of 35 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com