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Your favorite Waterlox finishing method

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Forum topic by Cjcorrell posted 04-06-2018 11:35 AM 582 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 120 days


04-06-2018 11:35 AM

So I am getting ready to finish my walnut dining table and I was wondering what your guys favorite Waterlox finishing method was. I’ve heard lots of different methods as far as brush on, wipe on, combination, whether to buff out after cure, etc.

Thanks


16 replies so far

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

364 posts in 1688 days


#1 posted 04-06-2018 01:53 PM

I like to wipe it vs brush, etc. I will sometimes make a pad from old t-shirt material and put it in a piece of stocking. But on bigger pieces, I will finish the coat I’m applying by opening the material and hold the corners and drag it across the surface. Obviously, this is only good for horizontal surfaces. I like to buff it out some, but it depends on the desired sheen.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 120 days


#2 posted 04-06-2018 01:59 PM



I like to wipe it vs brush, etc. I will sometimes make a pad from old t-shirt material and put it in a piece of stocking. But on bigger pieces, I will finish the coat I m applying by opening the material and hold the corners and drag it across the surface. Obviously, this is only good for horizontal surfaces. I like to buff it out some, but it depends on the desired sheen.

- Firewood

Does wiping it require more coats to build a finish?

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Firewood

364 posts in 1688 days


#3 posted 04-06-2018 02:39 PM

Yes. Wiping coats are considerably thinner than brushing, but it avoids runs. For a table top, you’ll want a good build up, so brushing the first couple coats may help speed up the process for you.

Sanding between coats is only needed to remove any dust nibs. Waterlox will blend in with the previous coat without sanding.

Don’t get discouraged with the first couple coats. They may not meet your initial expectations, but by the 3rd coat you should start to see a significant improvement.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 120 days


#4 posted 04-06-2018 04:08 PM



Yes. Wiping coats are considerably thinner than brushing, but it avoids runs. For a table top, you ll want a good build up, so brushing the first couple coats may help speed up the process for you.

Sanding between coats is only needed to remove any dust nibs. Waterlox will blend in with the previous coat without sanding.

Don t get discouraged with the first couple coats. They may not meet your initial expectations, but by the 3rd coat you should start to see a significant improvement.

- Firewood

So if I brush the first few, as far as the brush goes, I’ve read that a natural bristle brush is the thing to use. If so, is it readily available at home centers, or should I go to somewhere local like woodcraft for a better quality one?

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1737 posts in 2044 days


#5 posted 04-06-2018 04:26 PM

Waterlox will blend in with the previous coat without sanding

Depends on which Waterlox product is used – urethane requires sanding. Badger hair brushes are supposedly the best, but expensive. I like taklon brushes. Tho synthetic, they work well with varnish. Otherwise the finest bristle natural hair brush you can find, and the bbs probably wont have it.

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Firewood

364 posts in 1688 days


#6 posted 04-06-2018 04:41 PM

OSU55 is correct. My bad. I’ve only used the original formula and made a poor assumption.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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YesHaveSome

97 posts in 313 days


#7 posted 04-06-2018 05:37 PM



Yes. Wiping coats are considerably thinner than brushing, but it avoids runs. For a table top, you ll want a good build up, so brushing the first couple coats may help speed up the process for you.

Sanding between coats is only needed to remove any dust nibs. Waterlox will blend in with the previous coat without sanding.

Don t get discouraged with the first couple coats. They may not meet your initial expectations, but by the 3rd coat you should start to see a significant improvement.

- Firewood

I am using Waterlox for the first time on some walnut shelves I am making. It’s not going well. I am 5 coats in (wiped) and it’s got a lot of shiny spots. I was sanding with 400 between coats but stopped that after two. Last night I decided to test an area by giving it a pretty decent sanding with 320. The overall finish improved but I still had shiny spots. Gonna keep applying coats and see what happens. Finishing is not my strong suit and I am regretting not just using polycrylic.

-- But where does the meat go?

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ppg677

182 posts in 910 days


#8 posted 04-06-2018 06:12 PM

I use a foam brush. Light sanding between coats. 0000 steel wool over last coat.

I’m happy with the results.

But the fumes are super super nasty and I’ll never use it indoors again.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3195 posts in 644 days


#9 posted 04-06-2018 06:13 PM


I am using Waterlox for the first time on some walnut shelves I am making. It s not going well. I am 5 coats in (wiped) and it s got a lot of shiny spots.

- YesHaveSome

What do you mean by shiny spots? Waterlox Original (which I assume is being referred to when someone simply says Waterlox) goes on with about a 75 sheen. That’s pretty glossy. Were you expecting something else?

As to the OP, I have found I prefer using a good quality foam brush (they do exist). It lays down a good coat without brush marks. If you really want a perfect finish, spray your last coat, maybe two.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Cjcorrell's profile

Cjcorrell

12 posts in 120 days


#10 posted 04-06-2018 06:30 PM



I use a foam brush. Light sanding between coats. 0000 steel wool over last coat.

I m happy with the results.

But the fumes are super super nasty and I ll never use it indoors again.

- ppg677

Using the 0000 steel wool after the 30 days full cure or just 24hrs after last coat?

View BorkWood's profile

BorkWood

14 posts in 107 days


#11 posted 04-06-2018 07:39 PM

I use a papertowel/shop rag wrapped in a t-shirt or something to wipe on. Several coats and then buff to desired sheen with scotchbrite pad. I’ve only done this with the original, have a gallon of the Marine sealer and finish that I’m getting ready to try on an outdoor table top.

-- Matt, Woodworker based in NC, https://www.BorkWoodBlog.com

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 120 days


#12 posted 04-06-2018 09:11 PM



I use a papertowel/shop rag wrapped in a t-shirt or something to wipe on. Several coats and then buff to desired sheen with scotchbrite pad. I ve only done this with the original, have a gallon of the Marine sealer and finish that I m getting ready to try on an outdoor table top.

- BorkWood

So how many coats is several when using wipe on method? I know they recommend 3-5 when brushing on, but I also know using wipe on is harder to build a finish.

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

182 posts in 910 days


#13 posted 04-06-2018 09:41 PM


I use a foam brush. Light sanding between coats. 0000 steel wool over last coat.

I m happy with the results.

But the fumes are super super nasty and I ll never use it indoors again.

- ppg677

Using the 0000 steel wool after the 30 days full cure or just 24hrs after last coat?

- Cjcorrell

I just waited a couple days. The steel wool makes it nice and smooth and cuts down the luster slightly

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1564 posts in 3121 days


#14 posted 04-06-2018 11:24 PM

I always sprayed.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

977 posts in 549 days


#15 posted 04-08-2018 02:32 AM

I use Waterlox quite a bit. It is one of my go-to finishes for smaller pieces, especially cherry. I prefer to wipe it on using cheesecloth. Wiping will take more coats and as mentioned above the first two will look terrible. I wait 24 hours between coats and lightly scuff with 320 between coats to denib. 6 coats usually does it for me. wait about 2 weeks or more before rubbing out with steel wool if you want to cut the sheen, but be aware that the sheen will dull over the first 6 months on its own.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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