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My Separator batting .1000

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Forum topic by David Grimes posted 1167 days ago 2010 views 6 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


1167 days ago

My DC is the 2HP Harbor Freight pulling from the separator and to outside.

Separator Parts Used:
- Jet 30 gallon drum dolly
- Global 30 gallon white poly drum with solid lid (no bung holes) and with lid clamp (but clamp not needed)
- 1/4” plastic sign maker sheet (was 24×48, but I used half)
- 3 each 3/8” x 8” carriage bolts
- 6 each 3/8” nuts
- 3 each 3/8” ID flat washers
- 3 each 3/8” ID lock washers
- 1 Pair (set) of Rockler 4” Dust Separator Components
- 1 pair metal brackets to hold lid when emptying the barrel.

What I found to be true for my system:
- Works okay without a baffle
- Works great / perfect with a baffle.
- The baffle does not have to be tight or sealed against the side of the drum. It doesn’t even need to touch.
- The 240 degree slot and 120 degree can be varied and results are the same. 360 works just fine, too.
- The feed port should be located near the side and direct material parallel to the wall at that point.
- The suction port does not have to be a straight tube in the center, nor does it have to be any certain length. I have my curved port off-center and pointed at the side of the feed port.
- Venting outside was a great decision since I have had nothing at all vent out there except air.
- No crush at all even with both gates closed.
- No lid clamp required because the suction pulls the gasketed lid down tight when running. I can pick the whole thing up by the un-clamped lid with it running.

Pictures:



Not much here, I know. But what is here is table saw fines, cigarette butts and ashes, and some sheetrock dust. I was surprised that it got the ashes and the SR dust. I wet the banana and loquat tree outside that the system blows onto: Nothing !

I will make a pile of shavings this weekend and film/post results.
DG

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia


13 replies so far

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2158 days


#1 posted 1167 days ago

Good job and story.

I like the shelf brackets to hold the lid assembly while emptying the barrel.

-- Joe

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1264 days


#2 posted 1167 days ago

Man , I realy want to get my DC out of the shop NOW
Nice set up,dude
Only thing is I have to build a leanto first, on the side of my pole barn, should I pour cement or use wood for the floor ???

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#3 posted 1167 days ago

Pole barns are cool. If I lived more rural, I would have me a big ole pole barn. And put stuffes (sic) in there. :=)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1264 days


#4 posted 1167 days ago

Looking for advice from you here !!David , should I pour cement or use wood for the floor ?
I know more about woodworking and cabinet making, than I do about construction
What the hell are stuffes
??

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#5 posted 1167 days ago

stuffes = crude colloquial plural of stuff. Like “thangs” is to things.

Tell me is your pole barn concrete floor now?
How many sf for the addition ? 4×4=16sf? 6×6=36sf? 8×8=64sf? or if not square, then your proposed dimensions?

When you say wood, you mean footed piers holding up sill and girders with floor joists and tongue in groove 3/4” advantech ? (What we call a crawl space foundation ‘round here?)

What kind of siding is your pole barn ? Metal ? Wood ?
Roof metal (tin) as well ?

Answer these and we will build it virtually with approximate pricing.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1264 days


#6 posted 1167 days ago

The siding ,is, Metal, Roof ,as well
It has a Concrete floor, that is 2 or 3 inches above grade
4×4,x 6’ tall , is what I was thinking, and would be big enough
My biggest concern is to do this, without having any water problems in the future
I have to many, stuffes

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#7 posted 1166 days ago

lol… A yard of concrete ($125 ?..... varies by area) will cover 81 sf 4” thick. Since your current pad is only 2-3 inches above grade… and I assume you are okay with that finished grade… If you are allowed to have a monolothic slab in your area (Will you have to permit and be inspected?... How deep is your “frostline”? We dpn’t have one this far South.)... find out how deep and wide your footer has to be. Call your local inspector or a reputable foundation contractor and just ask. There are international and national and state and local codes and you have to go with whatever is the most strict.

Dig inside the perimeter that wide and that deep. Form outside the perimeter with 2x lumber level and to the height of your desired finish grade. Make sure the middle (what’s left that’s not footer) is at least 4” below the desired finish grade. Put your rebar onto the chairs around the perimeter (to separate and hold them up properly). Add moisture barrier plastic if required or if you wish, then pour the concrete. Add wire or fiberglass (kitty hair, we call it) to the order if required or you wish.

A 4×4 pad is so small, you could float it level and brush finish it all by yourself. Say your footer is 12” below grade and your finished grade is 3” above grade… you would only need about 3/4 to 4/5 of a yard for the whole job. Will your Redi-mix truck deliver that small amount? Do they have a minimum ? Can you order 1 yard and tell them to get rid of what you don’t need to their crush and run pile? Avoid portable mixer and bags unless you have one and can handle it.

It takes about as long to do this as it does to read and write it (except the digging… if you have clay, especially).

Total cost for concrete slab (w/ no labor costs) ? $200 ish
Wood cost = 4 each footed piers of 4×4 or block + 2×8 treated sills + bond timber + 2×6 joists + 3/4 Advantech sub-floor = probably 2 to 2.5 times more than a slab… and a broader skill set required.

Go concrete.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#8 posted 1162 days ago

One of my goals for the DC system was quiet. In person, with the DC in the closet and me in the shop it is very quiet in the shop. You can talk to someone normally without raising your voice at all. Just barely louder than when a central air conditioner cycles on inside the house. You can hear it, but you don’t have to talk louder or turn the TV up, etc. Of course, it is very loud in the closet. I know these were designed to roll around from machine to machine in the shop, but that was never on the agenda for this man cave.

It’s easy to record the sound, but hard to quantify with video/audio because the listener can have their volume set from low to high. This first video clip starts with the only sound being an oscillating wall fan on low. Then I turn the DC on and it really doesn’t get much louder in the room overall… and you can still hear the fan running even after the DC starts up.

http://s1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa450/davidcgrimes/?action=view&current=DSCN0565.mp4

The second is with a portable radio on volume setting 2 (background volume level), then turning the DC on and you can still hear the radio really well. The microphone on this Nikon tends to exaggerate sound’s levels a bit (I’m sure compression being heavily used to make it sensitive both close up and far away).

http://s1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa450/davidcgrimes/?action=view&current=DSCN0566.mp4

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#9 posted 1160 days ago

Well, lets see… how should i say this ?

Do not put a trash bag in a baffled separator. Mine, anyway.

LMAO

You know I just HAD to find out !

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2716 posts in 1840 days


#10 posted 1160 days ago

I have a similar setup as yours, except I’m using a 55 gal plastic drum. I haven’t plumbed it up yet, but it will be to the outdoors, as I live in a rural area and a little sawdust flying around is not a problem. I used plastic sewer pipe and fittings for mine. They mate up with 4” hose very closely. I did have to make some hose to pipe adapters, but fortunately I have a metal lathe and parts can be made with little effort. Great idea about the lid holder. Simple, but something I will also use. I didn’t put a baffle in my separater because my drum was necked down to a slightly smaller opening, but may at a later date.

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#11 posted 1160 days ago

Forget most of the detailed instructions on the baffle you might read or see. I spent maybe 30 minutes from start to finish on mine. Had I run into some problem because I ignored all the specific details, I would have dealt with it. I am a born skeptic. I ask why on every detail. I will run the BS flag up in a New York minute. (the old quality/process engineer in me) I got it right (perfect for me) the first time. Your drum necking down is not a problem at all. Just suspend it so that the intake port is closest to the side of the drum and it will work great. Mine just hangs and just barely touches the side of the drum in that are. Not sealed tight, doesn’t need to be and never will be.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1264 days


#12 posted 1160 days ago

The trash bag, did confirm ,that your system SUCKS ,right ??

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1236 days


#13 posted 1160 days ago

lol Yes, the system definitely sucks. Now (because of the garbage bag test) we know that it is prophylacticly challenged.

... just so long as it doesn’t throw up in the mornings !

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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