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Hand Plane Question

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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 05-12-2011 01:30 AM 1714 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

10866 posts in 1344 days


05-12-2011 01:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

Is a hand plane useful for smoothing/taking the “step” out of a less than perfect glue joint? If so, what type of plane? I have never used a hand plane and know less than nothing about them. Im sure to get some good advice as I know lots of LJs are hand plane addicts.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


23 replies so far

View Tony Strupulis's profile

Tony Strupulis

240 posts in 1777 days


#1 posted 05-12-2011 01:50 AM

Yes, you can do that. Use a card scraper first to get rid of glue squeeze out. Dried glue is very hard and it can quickly damage a plane iron.

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

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bandit571

6969 posts in 1338 days


#2 posted 05-12-2011 02:16 AM

OR, use one of those paint scrapers, to remove the glue lines. Then a good blockplane to go along the glue joint. Kind of skew the plane, that is go along the glue joint with most of the plane’s body on the lower side, and go along the joint at an angle.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Loren's profile

Loren

7556 posts in 2302 days


#3 posted 05-12-2011 02:20 AM

Hardened glue can chip the plane iron, but yes, a hand plane works great.

I usually scrape a joint down with a card scraper first and then hit the joint
with a handplane. I wouldn’t recommend cutting glue on a routine basis
with a plane, but in a pinch it works great.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1309 days


#4 posted 05-12-2011 02:36 AM

Agreed on the above statements about the “scraper first” approach, however it seems like the second part of your question has not been answered.

The type of plane depends on the type of work, a block is a good starter as they fit well in a machine driven shop, but as a general rule the longer your workpiece is, the longer your plane will need to be to make it flat. Get a good block plane with an adjustable mouth for now and see where that takes you.

How “off” is the joint?

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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gfadvm

10866 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 05-12-2011 03:04 AM

RGtools, the “step” is between a 32nd and a 64th. I dont know what a block is but I found a bench plane and a jack plane on the dreaded HF site for little $.Would one of these work for me to get my feet wet without spending a lot for a high quality plane? Both planes had very good reviews. Adjustable mouth???

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View neandernormite's profile

neandernormite

37 posts in 1226 days


#6 posted 05-12-2011 03:33 AM

I would say stay away from the HF planes. They will only frustrate you, most old Stanley’s will perform much better than them. Try and get your hand on a tuned plane and fix up a old Stanley if money is a concern. I say use a tuned one first so you know what the end result should be. With out a lot of research a handplane is one area where you get what you pay for; drop the money on a Veritas or the like and you will think they are perfect and be hooked. Get a HF special and think that there is some “magic” you just don’t have.

-- The confused powertool using galoot

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1309 days


#7 posted 05-12-2011 03:33 AM

HF? If you meant the Home depot, I do not recommend their hand planes, they are alomst too out of whack to be restored (you better off buying an old Bailey at a antique store for $20 and restoring it, it’ll usually be less work.)

If you are going to buy in on the cheap side buy small planes because the smaller tools are easier to restore. Here’s a good link on how to restore a block plane.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kv1zo9CAxt4

The adjustable mouth helps you control tear-out so if you are working with straight grained woods you can forgo it for now.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View thiel's profile

thiel

359 posts in 1946 days


#8 posted 05-12-2011 03:55 AM

gfadvm,

One thing: you can’t just buy a plane… you’ll need a lot of little things to go with it.

A plane that’s not sharp doesn’t work and it will drive you crazy trying.

Even if you sharpen the daylights out of a plane the first time, it will need resharpening and honing.

Which means you need a grinder (with jigs potentially) AND scary sharp setup (probably with a honing guide) OR you need a grinder (with jigs!) and some waterstones (probably with a honing guide, and a place to store them, and a waterproof area on which to use them).

And THEN, you’ll need to find a way to flatten and true both your grinding wheel AND your waterstones… which likely means a diamond cutting jig for the grinder (that both flattens AND trues/squares) and a flattening stone for the waterstones.

All of that together is way more expensive than a Festool sander. Just sayin :-)

All that said, if you get all that stuff working, planes can be a real joy and they bring a level of “manual-ness” to the work which is really a delight.

Having just been down this road myself, I started with Stanley planes on ebay and refurbed them myself, using them as training devices. After a few months I sold them and bought some Lee Valley planes (holy cow what a difference!) To put the differences in brief and in general and vaguely, Lee Valley planes have more “convenience” features than the Lie-Nielsen ones, and I’m lazy, so I like that. Bevel up planes are also simpler beasts then bevel down planes, so they are a good place to start. (Block planes are generally bevel up.)

I wouldn’t buy anything without an adjustable mouth. Wish my kids came with that feature.

I’m no expert… just sharing my experience. Your mileage may vary!

-- Laziness minus Apathy equals Efficiency

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lysdexic

4827 posts in 1277 days


#9 posted 05-12-2011 04:23 AM

If you are looking to level out a glue joint on occasion and would like to not partake in the pleasurable oddessy of hand planes, then I would suggest purchasing a card scraper for less than $10. Learn to burnish it which can be done with shaft of a large screw driver. Scrape away. It will remove a lot of material before going to sandpaper and save a bunch of money. If, of course, you can resist the seduction of hand planes. If not, I vote for the Veritas line.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1309 days


#10 posted 05-12-2011 04:26 AM

In reference to Thiels’ comment. He has some good points that sharpening is important, bu may take the price part a bit far.

Buy a flat piece of safety glass($13 lee valley) some rolls of 80 and 220 adhesive backed sandpaper. That combined with a $20 dollar honing guide and a homemade system of stops is your grinding system. http://www.lie-nielsen.com/pdf/AngleSettingJig.pdf

Instead of water stones buy some MDF, a can of spray adhesive and some automotive sandpaper in 400, 1500 and 2000 grit. Make the “stones” out of those, less mess and it’s cheap, and you don’t have to flatten the stones all the time.

That ought to get you going.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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gfadvm

10866 posts in 1344 days


#11 posted 05-12-2011 04:35 AM

Thiel,I use a card scraper now. I thought a plane might be faster with less wear and tear on my 62 year old hands. I use sandpaper glued to flat surface to sharpen my chisels with a honing guide. Will this work for a plane iron?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

6969 posts in 1338 days


#12 posted 05-12-2011 04:44 AM

It will work just fine for plane irons. I use mine all the time for both chisels and plane irons. The block plane I use is an old Stanley #110. I’ll even plane down plugs with it, when I cover screw holes with plugs, just as fast as a saw/sandpaper , and less ,arks to remove.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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RGtools

3302 posts in 1309 days


#13 posted 05-12-2011 05:16 AM

It works great. That’s what I use in my shop.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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gfadvm

10866 posts in 1344 days


#14 posted 05-13-2011 02:56 AM

Im tring to learn here so bear with me; how do you know how much blade/iron to expose below the bottom of the plane?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2752 days


#15 posted 05-13-2011 03:26 AM

It depends on what type of cut your trying to take. It varies if your using a scrub or jack plane to remove a lot of material, a jointer to flatten a board or a smooting plane to put on a final finish. You also need to consider the amount of the mouth that is open. The mouth is narrower for the thinner shaving your taking.

Here is a video to watch on the subject (types of planes):

http://www.youtube.com/user/LieNielsen#p/u/16/yxezEXHMt6o

Another on using a jack (not the best)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1uB3m_GMUI

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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