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Recommended pull saws?

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Forum topic by Brett posted 05-11-2011 07:15 PM 6902 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

660 posts in 2148 days


05-11-2011 07:15 PM

I’ve seen books and online articles that recommend types and sizes of Western saws to buy for woodworking by hand (typically carcase saws, panel saws, tenon saws, dovetail saws, etc.).
Is there a similar “list” for pull saws? If I want to buy two or three pull saws, what types and sizes should I get first? What types should I wait a few years before buying?

-- More tools, fewer machines.


12 replies so far

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#1 posted 05-11-2011 07:44 PM

I’ve got a couple of expensive Dozukis from Japan woodworker but I’m going to be brutally honest with you. I really find the Lowe’s $20 rip/cross dozuki very equivalent. It’s got no character and you won’t get “that” feeling when it hits your hand, but for $20, if you ding a tooth, you’re out $20. I buy them three at a time I love a quality tool as much as the next guy, but convenience has some relevance.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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dbhost

5607 posts in 2697 days


#2 posted 05-11-2011 08:05 PM

The blue handled Marples course / fine double sided pull saw, and flush cutting pull saw are in my arsenal. I could have bought MUCH more expensive saws, but these work great, and if I screw them up, they are something like $20.00 each. I don’t recall if they came from Home Depot or Lowes, but I can attest to being very happy with the performance of each. I don’t even look at my western style saws any more. They are probably getting lonely… I agree with Bertha. If you mash a tooth, you are only out $20.00. It isn’t a “fine” tool per se, but it works so well, and the rubberized plastic handle does feel quite good in the hand… Actually come to think of it, my flush trim saw is fine, but I need a new rip / cross Dozuki style saw. I did something stupid and mashed a couple of teeth a few days ago. (Do NOT run these into the iron faces of your vise!)

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#3 posted 05-11-2011 08:06 PM

+1 on the inexpensive big box pull saws. I have a couple of the real thing, but I like the Marples I got at Home Depot just as well. One exception is I had to go to a woodcraft store to get a “back saw” in the pull style. But, I got it on sale for ~$35 and I like it as well as my Veritas dovetail and tennon saws. Another good little pull saw is the orange handled Pony from Jorgensen. I’m building a picket fence with one of these. Cuts fast and clean. Great saw.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Brett's profile

Brett

660 posts in 2148 days


#4 posted 05-11-2011 08:10 PM

Can I use one pull saw for cutting dovetails, tenons, and miters, or should I get a couple different sizes? What about for rip-sawing?

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#5 posted 05-11-2011 08:24 PM

DB’s on the money, those tiny crosscut blades don’t mix well with vise faces or the floor, for that matter. I had typos in my first post that I was too lazy to correct. What I MEANT to say is that I buy them three at a time and label them with a fat Sharpie. For coarse work, i’ll use lowly #1; but for a show-face dovetail, I’ll break out the illustrious fresh #3. I’ve got post-vise-face beaters like DB mentions that I use to trim branches. They work fantastic, even dull. I’m a hand tool freak, so I don’t mind spending a ton of money on a tool. But when a capable one can be had for $20 (Marples, or “bear” I think mine is), what’s not to love:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#6 posted 05-11-2011 08:26 PM

you were typing while i was typing. The $20 jobs we’re talking about have rip teeth on one side and tiny, tiny cross-cut teeth on the opposing side. The rip teeth are a bit difficult to start but the cross-cut teeth will start easily with a forward stroke. The kerf is so fine that it’ll go where you want it. Go spend $20. You won’t be disappointed! PS one big box pull saw will do everything you describe and more.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Charles Maxwell's profile

Charles Maxwell

1081 posts in 3272 days


#7 posted 05-11-2011 08:27 PM

Marples saws at Home Depot! Best value for the price!

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

View Brett's profile

Brett

660 posts in 2148 days


#8 posted 05-11-2011 08:35 PM

The (only) review of the Irwin Marples pull saw say that there is a problem with teeth breaking off when it hits a knot. Is that a problem all pull saws?

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8256 posts in 2894 days


#9 posted 05-11-2011 08:45 PM

I have several of the big box saws in differing configurations as mentioned above. I find them very adequate for my needs. That being said, my son sent me a rip/cross Dozuki from Okinawa (have no idea of it’s cost) and the difference in sharpness and ease of cutting is amazing.
We’re going over there for a visit in Dec. and I plan to add a few more and a couple of their wooden planes, too.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 05-11-2011 08:50 PM

The teeth are indeed delicate. I’m not convinced that a $200 reed handled one is any less susceptible, but I could be mistaken. I treat them (disrespectfully maybe) as a hacksaw blade, buying them in bulk. It’s a distinctively “unfine” tool that does a fine job. Thin kerf and high TPI doesn’t scream longevity in my book. If you want to feel the rush at the touch, rehab an ancient Disston. If you want to connect with your inner woodworker, buy a high-end Japanese (http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id=01%2E117%2E02&dept_id=13085). If you want to saw crap, buy a big box.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WoodyWooderson's profile

WoodyWooderson

5 posts in 2046 days


#11 posted 05-12-2011 12:48 PM

There is a really good Japanese oriented hand tool blog called Giant Cypress. He wrote a really good post on types of pull saws for different tasks.

http://giantcypress.net/post/533383638/the-problem-with-buying-a-japanese-saw

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3593 days


#12 posted 05-12-2011 02:43 PM

I’ve been involved in Japanese woodcrafts for about 45 years.
I teach the use of Japanese tools.
Here’s the Japanese pull-saw that I recommend as a starter for most woodworkers.

Lee Valley

-- 温故知新

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