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frame and panel joinery (no cope and stick) using door edge molding

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Forum topic by floridagramps posted 05-11-2011 09:45 AM 2376 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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floridagramps

21 posts in 2142 days


05-11-2011 09:45 AM

I want to build a laundry center and bathroom vanity using frame and panel construction. Paint finish. I have table saw, router table and miter saw but lack rail and stile bits, jointer ,thickness planer and drill press.

My concept is to assemble hardwood frames using Rockler floating tenon joinery. After the frame is assembled, I will rabbet the inside edge so that I can inset a plywood panel that will be tacked and glued to the hardwood frame. Finally, add miterered molding to hold the door panel in place and sit proud on the frame. Looking for suggestions on what type of molding to use. I’ll then treat these completed panels as if they were plywood cut to size and use them for the sides of the cabinets I will build. I am debating whether to try using table saw dado blade to cut tongues and grooves that will be used to assemble the cabinets and attach the face frame or should I keep it simple and simply screw the components together and plug the holes.

This will be a first for me and I’d like to hear from someone who has used this approach and can give me pointers. I also need suggestions as to hinges…........I’d prefer not to use Euro hinges or mortising standard hinges. I will be using face frames assempled with pocket hole joinery. Perhaps Rockler has a non mortise hinge for full overhang doors


9 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

260 posts in 1393 days


#1 posted 05-12-2011 07:33 AM

I would get one of these Bits for my router to cut a 1/4” slot in the rails and stiles which is the mortise. Then use the same bit to cut a 1/4 tenon on the rails to fit the 1/4 motrise.

So now you have a mortise and tenon frame with a mortise for your plywood or your center panel. Glue it all together and you have a door or side to make you cabinet.

They also make this Bit in 1/2 shank and if your router will take 1/2 I would get that one.

Hope this makes sense

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

7825 posts in 2398 days


#2 posted 05-12-2011 07:40 AM

Without a jointer and/or planer, making accurate doors is very difficult
for a person unskilled in traditional bench work.

Still, if going ahead, only work with stock that is exceptionally flat and
free of twist. Use whatever joinery works for you, but use only true
and square boards for your rails and styles. A twist in one or two door
frame members of as little as 1 degree can visibly throw the door out
of flat.

You’d be better off ordering the doors from a cabinet door supplier.
Paint grade ones are cheap to buy.

I’m not telling you to be a jerk – I’m telling you because you’ll be gnashing
your teeth if you don’t get your boards square. This kind of stuff
drove me crazy when I was starting out and didn’t have a jointer.

The rabbeted recessed panel door with applied miter mouldings looks
great and I have made a lot of these doors. You can buy the
correct mouldings usually from moulding houses because they
are used in wainscotting a lot. You can also make your own on
a router table by cutting a rabbet in the back of an appropriate
profile or by making the entire moulding yourself. Either is not too
hard.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Sorethumbs's profile

Sorethumbs

38 posts in 1398 days


#3 posted 05-12-2011 06:36 PM

However you decide to build your “frames” one rule stays the same, the panel should not be glued with-in the rails and stiles. The panel needs to free-float or it will expand/contract and blow your jointery apart. Recessesed panel moulding can be made or bought and is what your looking for. Good Luck.

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

162 posts in 2149 days


#4 posted 05-12-2011 07:21 PM

I disagree with Sorethumbs as the OP indicated he intends to use plywood panels. I have personally glued many veneered MDF panels into hardwood cope & stick frames, and it hasn’t impacted joint stability at all. Solid wood panels are entirely another story, and here Sorethumbs is correct.

Floridagramps – I have had better luck with veneered MDF for door panels – they seem to stay flatter, and are also not undersized like most veneer-core panels (better fit for standard cope and stick router sets). This isn’t as much of an issue with your construction method.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1444 days


#5 posted 05-12-2011 07:33 PM

I couldn’t agree more with Loren. I’ve ruined more doors than I care to count by not having the appropriate equipment. I’m pretty handy with a jointer plane but for doors, I use a powered jointer. I also side with others above, that solid raised panels will likely explode your doors if glued solidly. I like space balls. I also just like saying space balls:) Plywoods so stable it’ll outlive cockroaches.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Sorethumbs's profile

Sorethumbs

38 posts in 1398 days


#6 posted 05-12-2011 07:55 PM

How do you guys ensure that every piece of stock is the exact same width after running the edges through the jointer? I remove saw marks from the edges of ripped stock on my jointer but do have problems keeping width exactly consistant. Is it me or the tool?

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1444 days


#7 posted 05-12-2011 08:00 PM

Ah, sorethumbs, this is why I prefer the hand operated jointer:) A couple of swipes with a Stanley #7 will give you a glass edge but you’ve got to watch your form for a planned glue joint. I’m in the market for a new powered jointer as we speak but I generally set for the smallest pass possible. I pushed a few boards across my friend’s 8” Oliver and I haven’t got the experience out of my mind. I know most of my current jointer problems are user-based but think a good jointer is worth the money.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Loren's profile

Loren

7825 posts in 2398 days


#8 posted 05-12-2011 08:05 PM

Sorethumbs,

Set your jointer to remove 1/32” at a pass.

Rip to 1/4”-1/2” over width (depending on board length), let the
wood move, joint one edge using a straight edge and square to
make sure you’re spot-on, rip to width 1/32” oversize, then joint
off the saw marks.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Sorethumbs's profile

Sorethumbs

38 posts in 1398 days


#9 posted 05-12-2011 08:22 PM

Good idea. I’ll give it a try.

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