LumberJocks

Shop location

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by Sawdust2012 posted 04-01-2018 12:41 PM 653 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

144 posts in 1912 days


04-01-2018 12:41 PM

I’m curious if anyone has ever put a wood shop in a bonus room over the garage. I have a basement right now, but am buying a house, and basements are a very limiting search feature in NC. I’d consider part of a 3 gar garage also, but would be concerned about the effects of tempature extremes on equipment and me! A separate shop really isn’t an option. Is there anything other than the dust issue, which I have addressed, that I am missing?
Thanks!


14 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1139 posts in 1016 days


#1 posted 04-01-2018 01:26 PM

You will need to beef up the floor/ceiling joists to accommodate the additional weight of equipment and projects. I am building a house and when we decided to convert the area over the garage into living space, the garage ceiling had to be redesigned. I am not sure I understand your concern about heating and cooling. It is easy enough to add garage heating and even cooling if you want to. The scope of that work would be less than converting the loft over a garage into a shop.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1307 posts in 2961 days


#2 posted 04-01-2018 01:29 PM

The main problem would be getting anything heavy or bulky in and out of the shop, like lumber, plywood, machinery, and large projects after they are built.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5088 posts in 2551 days


#3 posted 04-01-2018 01:35 PM

Moving machinery up into it would deter me, not to mention moving finished projects out and bringing in lumber and sheets goods. I think it would be far easier to heat the garage.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1070 posts in 2787 days


#4 posted 04-01-2018 01:38 PM

I started out with that thought but the bonus room is a one bedroom apt. The shop is downstairs I get 30×20 and my wife gets 13×22 to park in the winter.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1481 posts in 362 days


#5 posted 04-01-2018 01:43 PM

with a little planning – a 2nd or 3rd floor shop can be very manageable.
we are thinking of moving to Maggie Valley and if we find a house with
an upper floor bonus room and no room for a shop, and the codes allow it,
I would make a “barn loft boom” as illustrated here.
https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?242189-3rd-Floor-Shop (post #15).

as mentioned above, careful as to the floor layout for any heavy equipment
being placed on the load bearing walls of the lower rooms.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

144 posts in 1912 days


#6 posted 04-01-2018 01:49 PM

Good call, Art. The heaviest machines I have are a laguna fusion table saw and a Jet 14” bandsaw. Do you think either of those would cause a problem? I can’t imagine them being heavier than exercise equipment.


You will need to beef up the floor/ceiling joists to accommodate the additional weight of equipment and projects. I am building a house and when we decided to convert the area over the garage into living space, the garage ceiling had to be redesigned. I am not sure I understand your concern about heating and cooling. It is easy enough to add garage heating and even cooling if you want to. The scope of that work would be less than converting the loft over a garage into a shop.

- ArtMann


View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

144 posts in 1912 days


#7 posted 04-01-2018 01:50 PM

Good point. The older I get, the worse stuff like that hurts


The main problem would be getting anything heavy or bulky in and out of the shop, like lumber, plywood, machinery, and large projects after they are built.

- Planeman40


View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

144 posts in 1912 days


#8 posted 04-01-2018 01:54 PM

Wow! I think I’d like be your neighbor just to watch the show.


with a little planning – a 2nd or 3rd floor shop can be very manageable.
we are thinking of moving to Maggie Valley and if we find a house with
an upper floor bonus room and no room for a shop, and the codes allow it,
I would make a “barn loft boom” as illustrated here.
https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?242189-3rd-Floor-Shop (post #15).

as mentioned above, careful as to the floor layout for any heavy equipment
being placed on the load bearing walls.

.

- John Smith


View clin's profile

clin

954 posts in 1196 days


#9 posted 04-02-2018 02:40 AM

I converted one of 3 bays in my garage to a shop space. I put up a wall completely separating it from the other 2 bays. I also removed the garage door and replaced it with two large swinging, well insulated doors. So the whole thing seals really well.

I put in a mini-split AC unit to both heat and cool it. Just thought I’d point out that using your garage comfortably is an option.

-- Clin

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3848 days


#10 posted 04-02-2018 03:03 AM

Carrying big heavy stuff up and down stairs all
the time may dampen your enthusiasm. A sheet
of 3/4” cabinet grade plywood weighs about 60 lbs.
and a sheet of MDF about 90.

View bh1710's profile

bh1710

18 posts in 687 days


#11 posted 04-02-2018 11:57 AM



I converted one of 3 bays in my garage to a shop space. I put up a wall completely separating it from the other 2 bays. I also removed the garage door and replaced it with two large swinging, well insulated doors. So the whole thing seals really well.

I put in a mini-split AC unit to both heat and cool it. Just thought I d point out that using your garage comfortably is an option.

- clin

Agreed. Mini-Splits are pretty affordable when you weigh what you might have to do to modify that upstairs space. Plus moving equipment and sheet goods into garage bay is a lot easier than hauling it upstairs.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

188 posts in 730 days


#12 posted 04-02-2018 12:58 PM

I have been using an unheated/uninsulated garage shop for ~15 years now. It is doable, but not pleasent. I agree with the idea of a minisplit for the garage. Probably cheaper then the modifications you would need to make to get heavy equipment in the upper area.

Another thing to consider is electric. Electric is generally cheaper to run in a garage because the main panels are often located in the garage and surface wiring is appropriate in a garage.

Good luck.

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

144 posts in 1912 days


#13 posted 04-02-2018 01:02 PM



I have been using an unheated/uninsulated garage shop for ~15 years now. It is doable, but not pleasent. I agree with the idea of a minisplit for the garage. Probably cheaper then the modifications you would need to make to get heavy equipment in the upper area.

Another thing to consider is electric. Electric is generally cheaper to run in a garage because the main panels are often located in the garage and surface wiring is appropriate in a garage.

Good luck.

- RobHannon


Rob,
Easy access to plenty of electricity is a real good point. I think I’m going to insulate the door, and do a mini-split.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

855 posts in 1784 days


#14 posted 04-02-2018 02:07 PM

My stand-alone shop was originally built as a stand-alone garage. Neither my wife or I have an affinity for parking in a garage, in fact we think it’s easiest to not do so. I eventually converted that structure for my use, as dedicated shop space. For several reasons, I did make the decision to leave the typical, double wide roll up door.
. However-
I had the old door replaced with one that is double walled steel, which sandwiches 2” polyurethane foam insulation. My door is the Clopay brand. This highly insulted door has worked fabulously for me. Weather stripping all around the door opening makes for a good seal.

I mainly air condition the space, since heating is less concern in the climate of Houston. When there is a cold period, I use one, or possibly two, small 1500 watt electric space heaters and can keep it at 68 to 70 easily. A mini-split would be grand if my current capital expense budget allowed, but my window AC unit, installed in one wall, does a fine job of keeping it nice and cool, and dry.

Prior to the conversion project, it had open stud bays and open ceiling joists. I added 6” bat insulation to everything, and closed it all in with drywall. All this results in the space being set up just like a typical house is here, with the exception of the roll up door being in place.

One more thing – I got a small, portable dehumidifier for a couple hundred dollars at a big box store. It came with its own casters, and is easy to push around the shop to stay out of the way. When the ambient temps are in a decent comfort range, but the Houston humidity remains high, I run the dehumidification unit. Since all this was converted, I’ve had no surface rust, nor condensation problems.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com