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Forum topic by mustang958 posted 05-09-2011 09:31 PM 8175 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


05-09-2011 09:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: framing nailer framing nailer part harbor freight central pneumatic

Hello. Hoping someone can steer me in the right direction. Have a Central Pneumatic (Harbor Freight) 34 degree framing nailer Model 93099 which is probably close to 5 years old. Yes I know all the horror stories of HF but the gun actually works. The issue is the gasket between the body and the deflector is shot and of course HF doesn’t sell the parts for this model any longer. Question is; does anyone know if there is another manufacturer that makes a similar nailer with a gasket that would fit? I’ve looked around and have seen several that look close but it’s hard to tell just from a parts list/instruction manual. I reason most or all are made in Taiwan and probably use a lot of the same main parts so one of them has to fit. Already tried a Campbell Hausfeld gasket and although it was the right shape it was just a tad too small. Grizzly had one that looked exact but that model was discontinued also. Not really too concerned if I can’t get it working again, it served it’s purpose but at the same time it’s still in good shape. I really don’t need the nailer any longer and was hoping to try and sell it. Figured if I could locate a gasket that fit and was readily available I could get a few dollars for it on Ebay or Craigslist. Thanks for reading and I appreciate any suggestions.


14 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7626 posts in 2315 days


#1 posted 05-09-2011 09:36 PM

Take it to a nail gun service shop. I’ve done that before with old
guns. They opened them at no charge.

In your case the gun may be a new enough design parts from other
donor guns would fit, or parts from another maker.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#2 posted 05-09-2011 09:51 PM

Dumb thought, but why not make your own gasket? Gasket material is cheap at auto parts places…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


#3 posted 05-10-2011 12:15 AM

Thanks for both suggestions. With regard to the service shop I’ll have to check yellow pages or the web for something like that. And as far as making my own gasket, not a dumb thought at all. I did think about that. Wasn’t sure if it would work or not since the original gasket was like a hard rubber/plastic type gasket. Much stiffer than an O ring. Both good suggestions which I will have to explore further. Sometimes you need another person to point out what’s pretty much right in front of you which is good. Thanks.

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1474 posts in 2792 days


#4 posted 05-10-2011 04:37 PM

If all else fails, I got a tube of RTV High Temperature Silicone at an auto parts store that’s made for repairing or making gaskets.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View mustang958's profile

mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


#5 posted 05-11-2011 12:46 AM

Now the high temp silicone is something I hadn’t thought of. That’s a good idea. I think the gasket material or silicone is a more likely option for me. I’m not sure where I might find a repair center and I’m not about to drive all over the place to get to one. Thanks, I appreciate all of the ideas presented.

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

390 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 05-11-2011 01:03 AM

Why not go straight to the source? Harbor Freight Customer Service & Parts @ 800-444-3353.

View mustang958's profile

mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


#7 posted 05-11-2011 02:17 PM

Tried that already. Nailer is discontinued and they’re no longer providing parts for it.

View Richard's profile

Richard

923 posts in 1357 days


#8 posted 05-14-2011 06:40 AM

If you had it for a few years and it served it’s time for for what it was bought for and you don’t need it anymore, trash it and call it a good buy. Most HF stuff (but not all) is only ment to let you know if you if you willl use it enough to need a better tool or not.

View Steve2's profile

Steve2

75 posts in 2238 days


#9 posted 05-15-2011 03:44 PM

Richard says it succinctly “Most HF stuff (but not all) is only ment to let you know if you if you willl use it enough to need a better tool or not.”

Quit spending good time and money after bad, you had 5 years use; The repair kit for a known brand nailer, let alone service charges are more than the new retail value of a current model nailer.

-- Regards, Steve2

View William's profile (online now)

William

9076 posts in 1509 days


#10 posted 05-15-2011 03:58 PM

Wal-Mart sells the best gasket material you will ever need, tire inner tubes.
They sell them in the automotive section. Get the cheapest on, for like a 13” tire or something. Cut and make the gasket you need. Put the rest of the inner tube up till you need another gasket. I done industrial mechanic work for years. We were working on machines that hadn’t been produced since the 1940s. The only way we got gaskets were to make our own.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


#11 posted 05-15-2011 04:47 PM

Definitely not taking it in for service. Even I know that’s not worth it for a HF item. And as far as throwing good money after bad, I’ve had very good success with air nailers from HF so it’s hard to toss something that’s in such good shape. But I’m not about to turn cartwheels to get this working again. So far I’ve gotten quite a few ideas which don’t cost a lot and I don’t have to go out of my way to test. The inner tube idea is quite good. Remarkable how simple some solutions can be and they’re right in front of you. Thanks for all the input.

View Richard's profile

Richard

923 posts in 1357 days


#12 posted 05-15-2011 05:51 PM

We used inner tubes in the navy for some of the stuff in the engine room that was made befor I got of of grade school but was still in use on the ships.

View William's profile (online now)

William

9076 posts in 1509 days


#13 posted 05-15-2011 09:08 PM

I mentioned Wal-Mart because it’s one of those places that seem to be close to anywhere that I’ve seen inner tubes sold at.
However, the plant I worked at we didn’t have to go buy them. The plant recycled inner tubes into rubber slabs that was then shipped out to various companies (3M was our largest client) to be made into products. So we had an abundance of inner tubes.
Now keep in mind we were working on much larger gaskets than what you’re dealing with, but I still thought I’d tell you how we made our gaskets. We cut out a flat piece of inner tube to go where we needed the gasket. Then with one man holding the material in place, another man, using a ball peen hammer, tapped the edges all the way around and into any bolt holes, perferating the rubber material. Then it was just a matter of taking a razor knife and finishing off any material that was still holding waste material on. Shop made gasket for something that wasn’t made anymore.
In the automotive mechanical business, that I’ve also worked in, there’s another method I’ve used to make gaskets for obsolete carburators and such. I used the backs off of spiral tablet, the thin carboard kind. I just marked the pattern for the gasket with an inkpen. Then I cut it out with a razor knife or scissors, depending on the shape of the gasket. I used cardboard on carburators because it soaked up and became resilient to gas leakge. Gas would make rubber swell and fail too quickly though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mustang958

54 posts in 1814 days


#14 posted 05-15-2011 11:02 PM

Wow thanks. That’s some very useful information that I can put to use.

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