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What other trade's tools do you use in the shop?

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 05-06-2011 11:30 PM 1761 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1517 days


05-06-2011 11:30 PM

Here’s dental tools for cleaning out knotty areas and other such fine finessing, a 2 1/2” Starrett square from the printing trade, tongue depressors from your local streptocologist, a tack remover from the upholstery world, and a casket wrench from the funeral home.

Why a casket wrench? It is the coolest, slickest way to remove the arbor nut to change blades on my De Walt radial arm saw. Details on my blog.

Now, show us yours…

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


29 replies so far

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1359 days


#1 posted 05-07-2011 12:03 AM

While it is not a tool of another trade, I have what I believe is a part of someones eye glasses that I use for a glue scrapper to clean up hard to reach places. Works great. Found it in the parking lot in front of my shop.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Loren's profile

Loren

7625 posts in 2314 days


#2 posted 05-07-2011 12:20 AM

I use both a linotype saw and a small overarm router, both built for
the typesetting industry. Amazingly high-quality equipment.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1517 days


#3 posted 05-07-2011 12:37 AM

Speaking for myself and ten thousand other cheering fans, Loren, we’d like to see pix of both of these!

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View lew's profile

lew

10060 posts in 2422 days


#4 posted 05-07-2011 01:47 AM

Welder, electrician’s tools and plumbers soldering equipment

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1517 days


#5 posted 05-07-2011 02:20 AM

Could you be more specific, Lew?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10988 posts in 1356 days


#6 posted 05-07-2011 05:14 AM

Gasket punch set[8$ from HF]cuts all sizes of leather feet for boxes,tables,etc.Gas[c02 or argon]from my mig welder to preserve unused finish rather than Bloxygen at 10$ a can.Farriers shoe puller is my favorite tool to remove nails when reclaiming lumber[much faster and easieer than hammer/nail bar].I just repurposed my Makita die grinder to a cool trim router with a shop made wooden base.Syringes and needles for getting glue into tight places…....and the list goes on !

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View derosa's profile

derosa

1556 posts in 1502 days


#7 posted 05-07-2011 05:35 AM

As a bicycle mechanic I’ve found some of the tools to be useful, especially spokes which are frequently re-purposed as tools. I like to use a sharpened spoke for cleaning out the crevices in my power tools to keep them looking cleaner; for those with long haired women in their family the head of the spoke can also be used to clean clogged shower drains quickly and easily. Not quite tools but I’ve also used bike parts to create jigs and have been thinking of making a small bandsaw mill for the garage using bike wheels.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1306 days


#8 posted 05-07-2011 05:49 AM

Since I draw plans (by hand and computer), I have drafting scales, protractor, compass, french curves, etc. For smaller projects, I have used these tools directly for layout. Of course they work wonderfully. And working in the 1” = 1” scale world is easiest of all.

If only I could feed wood directly into my Designjet 430 to print the cut lines !

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View auggy53's profile

auggy53

159 posts in 1346 days


#9 posted 05-07-2011 05:52 AM

rotory file i got from a friend , its made for metal work but i needed to sand a curved piece and the drum sander wasnt doing a good job so i put the rotory file in my drill press and used it , it did a great job !

-- rick

View greenshopGuy's profile

greenshopGuy

5 posts in 1252 days


#10 posted 05-07-2011 03:10 PM

A Baldwin surface gauge used in the offset printing industry to set the knives on my jointer

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5702 posts in 2095 days


#11 posted 05-07-2011 03:26 PM

Open end wrenches to gauge thicknesses out of the planer. Sockets for laying out curves on corners and gauging radii for band saw work. Strips cut from pop cans for shims. Uni-Strut, face to face with long bolts for cauls for edge/edge glue ups. Serves as a poor man’s veneer press, too. Old florescent ballasts wrapped in duct tape for all sorts of uses, weights, stops, props.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4378 posts in 1703 days


#12 posted 05-07-2011 04:26 PM

Lee, I think the one, for me, is the engineers square. Adjustable for blade length but still reliably 90°.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1359 days


#13 posted 05-07-2011 04:53 PM

15 ton Simplex jack for a counterweight on the bottom step of a step ladder/stool that doubles has my routertable stand. I made the step ladder for working on tall doors and transoms. The Simplex jack was use by railroads. Found it at a dump 30 years ago! Also have used the jack for lollie column installation in houses with basements.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1517 days


#14 posted 05-07-2011 05:16 PM

greenshopguy, can you get us a picture? Sounds interesting.

gfadvm, the farrier’s puller sounds practical—picture?

Bike spokes, derossa, can be made into nifty little hooks, but that ain’t tools.
Guitar string cutoffs (low E and A), on the other hand, become handled tools that will ream a glue nozzle.

I love the Simplex jack, devann. I guy could go overboard having them in several sizes, two of which are shown here.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1517 days


#15 posted 05-07-2011 05:18 PM

Should we start another thread that’s not actual tools from another trade, but just devices or materials that are repurposed to be used in the shop?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

showing 1 through 15 of 29 replies

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