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Forum topic by jamsomito posted 03-24-2018 06:15 PM 795 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


03-24-2018 06:15 PM

Alright, so I posted this in the HomeRefurbers sister forum and all I got was a bunch of spam replies. Figured it couldn’t hurt to post here. My apologies if it doesn’t belong here.

I’ve owned my home for about 3 years now, first one, and I’m looking at adding a shed. Local code gives me 3ft clearance between any structures, property lines, and easements, which unfortunately leaves me with a less-than-ideal location in the back yard, OR I can build one as an attached accessory structure. I want to do the latter. I have found several good books on building stand-alone sheds, but I’m really scratching my head on a few questions about how everything ties together as now there is vinyl siding, foundation walls, drain tiles, ledger board, etc involved.

Can anyone recommend any good books or resources that could help me make sure I’m considering all the right things before I submit my permit and get shut down by the city? Thanks.

——————————————

A bit more info for those interested:

- I’m thinking a big lean-to, almost. Between 8×8 and 12×12. How big can I go?

- will share 2 walls with the house (in an “inside” corner) – one side will be flat, one sloped, how do I do the latter attachment? (flashing, tape, tyvek, etc etc)

- area is lower than the front of the house, so about 3ft of foundation wall is exposed at the bottom of the shed wall – how do I “attach” to this?

- existing concrete pad from an old hot tub. How thick a pad do I need? Pad is 2ft from the house, can I just extend this up against the foundation walls? Do I need to provide more drainage around the shed drip line?

- what do I need to know about vinyl siding?

Right now this is just storage space, but eventually I want to punch a 6” hole between the shed and the garage wall it abuts against to pass a dust collection line though and keep the collector in the shed.


29 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1256 posts in 249 days


#1 posted 03-24-2018 07:16 PM

photos of your proposed project area would help a lot.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 474 days


#2 posted 03-24-2018 07:18 PM

You need two things:
1. Architect
2. Builder
You’ll have your leaning shed done correctly…

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jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#3 posted 03-24-2018 07:26 PM


You need two things:
1. Architect
2. Builder
You ll have your leaning shed done correctly…

- caboxmaker

I don’t have budget for that though. I’m an engineer and I know I can figure this out, I just need a reference. My local code book is $150 ish, and I’d like to avoid that if a $30 home reno book would cover it. Ideally I’d like something on attached accessory structures, but I just can’t seem to find anything.

Excuse the mess, in need of some spring cleaning, but this is the area. I just remembered the dryer vents under the windows too – would need to address that somehow. Again, just don’t know what the codes and guidelines are around such things. Maybe it’s not possible, I have no idea.

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jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#4 posted 03-24-2018 07:29 PM

Ok, I’ve been struggling with the picture rotation for a while, not sure how to fix that, sorry.

I want to respect all of you too – if you want to offer straight advice, I’d happily take it, but I’m not expecting answers to all of my questions here. Just need a lead in the right direction. I figured I’d need more than just an idea if I call the inspector with questions too, so haven’t done that yet.

Thanks for the replies so far.

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caboxmaker

281 posts in 474 days


#5 posted 03-24-2018 07:40 PM

It would seem that a detached structure would offer a lot less trouble to make. Do you have room in the backyard?

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jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#6 posted 03-24-2018 07:44 PM

Agreed, and that was the first thing I looked into. I only have 1/3 acre and there’s a huge 20ft easement through my backyard for a drainage ditch, so it only leaves me with the middle of my backyard which I don’t really want to give up. This is the only spot it could go.

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jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#7 posted 03-24-2018 07:48 PM

I thought about getting one of those 8×8 plastic sheds and just plopping it on the existing pad, but the more I think about it, the more I like the idea of having it attached here so I can pass through into the garage. Plus, I feel like I can do it for the same price and have a much more solidly built structure in the end. That, and gain some valuable knowledge along the way. So I’m willing to put in the time to research it, just having a hard time finding the right place to start right now.

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

92 posts in 191 days


#8 posted 03-24-2018 08:22 PM

Do you have to deal with HOA?

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12246 posts in 2467 days


#9 posted 03-24-2018 08:26 PM

Learn the codes and hire an actual carpenter, check their references.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#10 posted 03-24-2018 08:26 PM


Do you have to deal with HOA?

- Fthis

Nope, one of the criteria when we bought the house! But I do want to do it “right” and get a permit, which means doing everything to code.

View mrg's profile

mrg

828 posts in 3086 days


#11 posted 03-24-2018 09:15 PM

I would go and talk to the building inspector in town. They will tell you what you will need and then draw your plans according to what they tell you.

You may want to get a prefab shed and just drop it in that space using your existing pad. It’s considered a removable structure and not taxed and probably way less expensive than building onto the house.

My 10×14 she’d with loft was like $3500 delivered and placed on the site.

-- mrg

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1256 posts in 249 days


#12 posted 03-25-2018 01:34 AM

A bit more info for those interested:

- I’m thinking a big lean-to, almost. Between 8×8 and 12×12. How big can I go? depends on your codes

- will share 2 walls with the house (in an “inside” corner) – one side will be flat, one sloped,
how do I do the latter attachment? (flashing, tape, tyvek, etc etc). again – must meet building codes

- area is lower than the front of the house, so about 3ft of foundation wall is exposed
at the bottom of the shed wall – how do I “attach” to this? anchor lag bolts with a P/T ledger – to code

- existing concrete pad from an old hot tub. How thick a pad do I need? Pad is 2ft from the house, can I just extend this up against the foundation walls? Do I need to provide more drainage around the shed drip line? drainage is essential – 4” reinvorced slab is common – must meet code
what do I need to know about vinyl siding? hire a vinyl siding guy

Right now this is just storage space, but eventually I want to punch a 6” hole between the shed and the garage wall it abuts against to pass a dust collection line though and keep the collector in the shed. this open up all kinds of water intrusion issues – could rot out your walls – must meet code

you said: I do want to do it “right” and get a permit, which means doing everything to code.
so – with your statement, you must learn ALL the building codes that pertain to your project and adhere to them prior to starting your project – or hire a contractor.

and if you are an engineer – you know that codes are there for a reason.

.

in Florida – the building and plans department do not give advice
or steer you into the right direction…... they expect you to know
the codes and what you are doing or hire a licensed contractor who does.
I was given the speech that they are not teachers – only approvers.
I submitted 3 sets of plans for a two car garage before it was finally approved.
so, Jam – if you go to the planning dept for advice, be on your best behavior.
every state and county is different as to building codes. but some are engraved
in stone, such as the National Electrical Code (NEC).
as per the above – it would be in your best interest to at least consult with a builder.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 474 days


#13 posted 03-25-2018 01:46 AM



You need two things:
1. Architect
2. Builder
You ll have your leaning shed done correctly…

- caboxmaker


I think you should spend some time, with a list of questions, with both an architect and builder. Pay them by the hour to answer your questions. It’ll be money well spent.

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

177 posts in 2331 days


#14 posted 03-25-2018 02:05 AM

The biggest issue I see. is anything attached is going to need frost footings. Also do to the difference in elevation you would need steps which would take up a big area of a small shed. I suppose you could use a post or two with beams and set the floor on them, but not cheap. Of course if your going to go through the footing expense you may as well go bigger, be a pretty easy build.

If you want to stay cheap build a structure to fit in the corner and don’t attach. you can put door through garage, slab is plenty thick..

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

182 posts in 513 days


#15 posted 03-25-2018 03:41 AM

I should clarify I don’t want a door going through. It’ll be a separate space, but I might pipe a dust collection line through the wall at a later date.

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