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Forum topic by BlackRibbonDesigns posted 03-23-2018 12:49 PM 12397 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BlackRibbonDesigns

10 posts in 118 days


03-23-2018 12:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: beginner rookie steve ramsey

Hello, everyone.

I am excited to soon be embarking on what I see as a “new chapter” in my life. My family and I are buying our first house in a few weeks and I am eagerly awaiting my wood shop space in the garage. I am new to woodworking but I have been saving every extra penny, investing in equipment for my new shop. So far I’ve purchased a contractor’s style table saw, a thickness planer and a small cnc router (I run a large, fairly expensive cnc machine at my job as a sign maker), plus a few other, slightly less exciting things.

But my main question is this… Should I buy Steve Ramsey’s weekend woodworker’s course? I realize that this is entirely subjective and there’s no right or wrong answer but what would you suggest? It costs around $150. I have watched quite a few of his videos and I am sure I would get my money’s worth. But $150 would buy a lot of books as well. Are there other, similarly structured courses that I should consider before plopping my hard earned cash down? Is there a recommended reading list that I would do better to invest in?

I look forward to hearing your input. And I’m very excited that I found this forum.

-Caleb


41 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1048 posts in 959 days


#1 posted 03-23-2018 01:20 PM

There’s not much in the way of instructional video that you can’t find on YouTube, including many offerings from Steve Ramsey himself. Save your money until you’ve exhausted all the free resources that are available.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1113 posts in 213 days


#2 posted 03-23-2018 01:24 PM

Caleb – you can not put a price on expanding your education !!!
it does not matter if it is boat handling, fishing techniques, engine repair,
Letterhead Meets for sign making, yada yada yada . . .
so if you get a chance to enhance your existing skills or learn new ones,
and it is within your budget and time, make the most of it.
it can very well save you many tears, heartaches and frustrations in the future.
best of luck to you and your family in your new digs !!

and X2 with Ripper: take advantage of all the free resources that are available.
but – be forewarned: just because someone posts something on YouTube does not
necessarily mean it is the right way or the safest way….. many professional craftsmen
post videos that I feel comfortable with – so do a lot of clowns that can get you HURT.
so use your own best judgement when applying that knowledge into your projects .
... and always WORK SAFE …!!

Read, Understand and Follow all directions and safety precations on all
products and equipment you may use. (Norm said that).

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Steve's profile

Steve

486 posts in 633 days


#3 posted 03-23-2018 02:14 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGyxZEZUn3A

I recently came across the King’s fine woodkworking channel and like his videos.

He talks about doing a 16 part series for free on different projects. Might be worth waiting for those before paying money for something.

View omgitsmike's profile

omgitsmike

4 posts in 334 days


#4 posted 03-23-2018 02:37 PM

OP – I’m in a similar position, just starting out, building out a small shop out of a tiny garage.

I’ve watched a ton of Steve Ramsey’s videos, as well as Dave Picciuto (Make Something), Marc Spagnolo (Wood Whisperer), Colin Knecht (WoodWorkWeb), Jay Bates, Chris Salamone, etc.,. I’m also on the fence as well – I’ve picked up a lot learning from the guys above and can figure a lot of plans/joinery/etc., but $150 isn’t too much to get jump-started if the content is good.

I’m leaning towards signing up today because (a) the 15 bonus plans expires today, and (b) there’s a 30-day no-questions-asked 100% refund anyway. I figure I could sign up, check it out, and if it turns out it’s underwhelming, I could just get the refund.

Also, Steve’s an awesome guy and I’ve learned a lot from his free videos already, it’s a good way to support someone who’s done a lot for the community!

View Rich's profile

Rich

3175 posts in 640 days


#5 posted 03-23-2018 02:55 PM

Our very own Charles Neil — known industry-wide for his expertise in woodworking and finishing — did a 26-part series a few years ago on building a pie safe three different ways. You might not have any interest in building a pie safe, but these videos cover every aspect of woodworking, from construction best practices to wood movement to finishing, and everything in between. These are things you will deal with in virtually every project you build, and knowing the right way to do them will save you time, grief, and, particularly in the case of wood movement, failure or your project down the road with cracked tops, broken joints, etc.

Give them a look. You’ll be getting about 15 hours of expert instruction for free. Just search on youtube for “charles neil pie safe,” and dig in. His other videos are excellent too, but this one happens to be a complete series.

Since you’re talking about spending some money, his series on Cases and Bases, Drawers and Doors, and finishing are for sale on his web site and are all excellent. There are countless tips about things like grain-matching face frame and door stiles that will set your work apart from the pack without any extra effort or skill on your part. It’s just one of those things you probably wouldn’t think of yourself, but makes a big difference in the final result.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

534 posts in 791 days


#6 posted 03-23-2018 04:18 PM

This may be obvious, ignorant, or some combination thereof, but my best suggestion before starting any kind of “series” is to attempt a first small-ish project yourself. My first one was a nightmare. I worked safely, but very inefficiently. I also learned a lot about making errors in layout, planning, gluing, etc. The downside was I went in fully ready to believe my first ever woodworking project would be a rousing success. Going in knowing that the first few projects may be more learning from your mistakes can take the sting out a little.

Plus, this will give you a little more time to investigate what you like doing in the shop, which may direct your toward certain instructional materials.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12014 posts in 2431 days


#7 posted 03-23-2018 04:23 PM

I’ve been watching Steve Ramsey almost since he started. I believe he understands wood movement, joinery, and how to safely use machinery. I admire his focus on weekend project building and his work ethic. He is due most of the credit for making woodworking popular on YouTube and I believe has done more to popularize woodworking as a hobby than almost anyone else in the last 10 years. If you are a fan of his channel and want to make similar projects then I would say go for it. There is nothing wrong with paying for instruction. As for books, I highly recommend the Tage Frid trilogy and a good book on finishing. And I would buy those books regardless.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 439 days


#8 posted 03-23-2018 05:34 PM



OP – I m in a similar position, just starting out, building out a small shop out of a tiny garage.

I ve watched a ton of Steve Ramsey s videos, as well as Dave Picciuto (Make Something), Marc Spagnolo (Wood Whisperer), Colin Knecht (WoodWorkWeb), Jay Bates, Chris Salamone, etc.,. I m also on the fence as well – I ve picked up a lot learning from the guys above and can figure a lot of plans/joinery/etc., but $150 isn t too much to get jump-started if the content is good.

I m leaning towards signing up today because (a) the 15 bonus plans expires today, and (b) there s a 30-day no-questions-asked 100% refund anyway. I figure I could sign up, check it out, and if it turns out it s underwhelming, I could just get the refund.

Also, Steve s an awesome guy and I ve learned a lot from his free videos already, it s a good way to support someone who s done a lot for the community!

- omgitsmike


I think your answer is in para. 3 above. If you don’t like it get your money back.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3175 posts in 640 days


#9 posted 03-23-2018 06:10 PM


I think your answer is in para. 3 above. If you don t like it get your money back.

- caboxmaker

A dishonest person would simply sign up, do a screen capture on all of the videos, and then get a refund.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2421 posts in 3921 days


#10 posted 03-23-2018 06:48 PM

I never go on a forum and promote my products.
Steve is excellent and quite the enterainer.and a friend.
If your a beginner he is a good place to start.
However we have a series called
mastering woodworking.
Its a subscription based series and like youtube. We were the first to do videos. On line.
Itsbeen running gor 6 years or or more
And continues. We do a 1/2 hour to 45min show every week.
If it pertains to wood working its there. From corner cabinets ..kitchen cabinets. Highboys..lowboys..tables. reclaimed lumber..
There are over 400 videos of every project you can imagine..all selected for their educational value
In addition there is my on line finishing class.if it pertains to finishing its there.
You can also watch every dvd i have ever filmed

Its about 200.00 a year..but we have 3 month and 6 month subscriptions…

If you want to know more email Sherri.cnw@msn.com
And like everything we sell if you dont like it we will refund your money. No questions asked.

As rich suggested go check out our YouTube’s
Search Charles Neil woodworking
We also have a forum and you have direct email and phone with me.
Or you can email me charles.cnw@msn.com
When we combined the finishing class..which took me a year to do with the mastering woodworking. The price went up. I will ask Sherri to give and lj the old price.you have to tell her your a lumberjock

Just fyi.

View JohnDi's profile

JohnDi

52 posts in 1485 days


#11 posted 03-23-2018 10:12 PM

On the free side, I would suggest some of the earlier wood whisperer ( Marc spagnolo) build videos.
And of course almost every episode of New Yankee Workshop is on YouTube

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

670 posts in 591 days


#12 posted 03-23-2018 10:42 PM

IMHO, I wouldn’t buy a thing from Steve Ramsey. Much of his content is free on his YouTube channel. There is a reason for that. There are many other places on YouTube and the world wide web to get information at no cost. I believe you learn best by doing. Find a seasoned wood worker and go to them for lessons. I’ve been teaching and learning for 40 years. There’s always something to learn and something to teach. Woodworking is one of those things others are willing to show you.(for free) You just have to find the person willing to share.

Welcome to Lumberjocks by the way. I find this woodworking community to be the best anywhere. Lots of good advice and people willing to share their experiences. You are well on your way to becoming a great woodworker starting here…...

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Geeph's profile

Geeph

3 posts in 121 days


#13 posted 03-23-2018 11:12 PM

I’m relatively new to woodworking and signed up for Steve Ramsey’s course after watching many hours of his videos. It’s a good course. It’s not simply a re-hash of free videos and not the typical youtube channel content. It is a well thought out instructional course, guiding you step by step through a series of progressive projects. The quality of the production is good as is the quality of instruction. The plans are top notch. It’s easily worth the $150.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1062 posts in 654 days


#14 posted 03-23-2018 11:38 PM


There s not much in the way of instructional video that you can t find on YouTube, including many offerings from Steve Ramsey himself. Save your money until you ve exhausted all the free resources that are available.

- Ripper70


+1
I learned a lot of the basics from Steve Ramsey without buying his course. There are thousands of free online courses and vids and series that are available. IMO I’d wait until you have exhausted (and that could take years) all of the free content before purchasing. Every season of every New Yankee, Tommy Mac, Woodsmith etc is available free online with a little digging. Not to mention all of the youtube gang, i.e. Jay Bates etc. Not only that, but youtube can give you a plethora of videos on a very specific topic with a plethora of ways to do it using a variety of tools. Like mortise and tenon. As soon a somebody whips out their Festool domino I move on to someone who has the same tools as i do.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View BlackRibbonDesigns's profile

BlackRibbonDesigns

10 posts in 118 days


#15 posted 03-23-2018 11:45 PM

Wow. Thank you all so much for you input. I will be looking into every suggestion above. I’m still undecided but at least now I have some input to ponder.

Thanks again.

-Caleb

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