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Walnut Dining Table Choices

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Forum topic by Cjcorrell posted 03-22-2018 09:10 PM 564 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


03-22-2018 09:10 PM

So, furst time to the forum, and I know this question has been asked before in different ways, I just haven’t found what I’m looking for, but it may not exist. Im finishing a 4ftx6ft walnut dining table with a hard maple base. The thing I keep going back on is the finishing. I really want that natural look to it, that’s why I lean towards Danish oil. BUT, I have a 3 year old, and we have guests frequently as well. So it has some heavy traffic for sure. My question is, can I create my own Danish oil that is stronger than regular Danish oil, but doesn’t look like a film finish? Maybe by using a resin in the blend? Thank you.


18 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

974 posts in 545 days


#1 posted 03-22-2018 10:15 PM

If you are looking for a close to the wood look that is more durable than a straight oil consider Arm-R-Seal or Waterlox.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Woodknack

11998 posts in 2430 days


#2 posted 03-22-2018 10:23 PM

The advantage to Danish oil is its easy to apply because it has a lot of thinner. The trick to not looking like a film finish is a smooth matte finish. You can use a regular varnish or poly but sand the coats smooth using progressively finer grits and buff the final coat to a matte finish with steel wool or a scratchy pad made for finishes.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


#3 posted 03-23-2018 02:11 AM

I have been leaning towards Waterlox or Rockhard, I was just afraid that it would give too much of that film finish. You guys have any favorite methods or applying Waterlox or Rockhard?

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TungOil

974 posts in 545 days


#4 posted 03-23-2018 02:19 AM

I hand wipe Waterlox using a pad made from folded cheesecloth. Be sure you have very good ventilation as it smells terrible.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Walker

135 posts in 522 days


#5 posted 03-23-2018 05:31 AM

Something else to consider, Waterlox also makes a Urethane finish available in satin. Just as clear as Danish Oil, but made for floors and counter tops, so it’s stronger. I’ve had it on my basement stairs for over a year, so far it has held up to a lot of foot traffic.

https://waterlox.com/products-item/waterlox-oil-modified-satin-wood-floor-sealer-finish

-- ~Walker

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


#6 posted 03-23-2018 09:01 AM



I hand wipe Waterlox using a pad made from folded cheesecloth. Be sure you have very good ventilation as it smells terrible.

- TungOil

Do you cut it at all on the first coat?

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


#7 posted 03-23-2018 09:02 AM



Something else to consider, Waterlox also makes a Urethane finish available in satin. Just as clear as Danish Oil, but made for floors and counter tops, so it s stronger. I ve had it on my basement stairs for over a year, so far it has held up to a lot of foot traffic.

https://waterlox.com/products-item/waterlox-oil-modified-satin-wood-floor-sealer-finish

- Walker

Same application procedure as regular waterlox?

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PJKS

49 posts in 571 days


#8 posted 03-23-2018 09:42 AM

Wipe on poly is very user friendly ..
Several coats would give you great protection…

-- Pat / Colorado

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knotscott

8078 posts in 3425 days


#9 posted 03-23-2018 10:18 AM

For a table I’d go poly or waterlox. You just need to rub it out good to get the natural look you want.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


#10 posted 03-23-2018 10:47 AM

If I did the waterlox, would there be benefit to adding Danish oil before?

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

974 posts in 545 days


#11 posted 03-23-2018 11:12 AM


I hand wipe Waterlox using a pad made from folded cheesecloth. Be sure you have very good ventilation as it smells terrible.

- TungOil

No, but you must start with the original sealer/finish. No benefit to adding danish oil first, it is a ting oil based product.
Do you cut it at all on the first coat?

- Cjcorrell


-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1239 posts in 2398 days


#12 posted 03-23-2018 11:19 AM

I agree with Tung.

I usually use Watco Danish oil as the first coat on walnut as a sealer of sorts. If the piece is entirely walnut, I’ll use the “Dark Walnut” to help even out any light patches. After 48 hours I lightly sand it with 800 grit paper then move on to Arm-R-Seal. 3 coats, with light sanding, 1000 grit, to knock off any nubs, and then a final sanding with 2000 grit and Behlens deluxing compound brings out all of the depth, color, and grain in the walnut. If you don’t want the semi-gloss look, buff the top with some 0000 steel wool after you are finished to achieve a satin finish.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

469 posts in 1512 days


#13 posted 03-24-2018 01:18 AM

So I agree with tungoil that the arm r seal or Waterlox would be best for a dinning table and the abuse it will receive.
However I have used Danish oil on almost everything I have done. Last year I made a set of live edge end tables and wanted a little more protection than what I thought Danish oil would give.
I had a friend that has used the Sam Malloof oil finish that rockler sells.
I gave it a try and liked it. Applies like Danish oil, but has a bit more poly in it.
Builds a nice protective layer with several coats.

-- John

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Cjcorrell

12 posts in 115 days


#14 posted 03-24-2018 02:29 AM



So I agree with tungoil that the arm r seal or Waterlox would be best for a dinning table and the abuse it will receive.
However I have used Danish oil on almost everything I have done. Last year I made a set of live edge end tables and wanted a little more protection than what I thought Danish oil would give.
I had a friend that has used the Sam Malloof oil finish that rockler sells.
I gave it a try and liked it. Applies like Danish oil, but has a bit more poly in it.
Builds a nice protective layer with several coats.

- bigJohninvegas

How would you say it holds up compared to Waterlox? I’m beginning to think that Waterlox is just on a different level compared to other finishes when it comes to protection.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1734 posts in 2039 days


#15 posted 03-24-2018 12:54 PM

Just use some poly thinned down (I use minwax thinned 1:1). Apply it like danish oil, flood on, keep wet, wipe off after 5-10 minutes. I use semi gloss so any negative grain or defect isnt real shiny. 3 coats min. Add more film coats if desired. Color with lockwood oil based dye in the poly. You might find this interesting reading.

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