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Gift recommendation needed- tools for shaping knife scales

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 03-21-2018 01:50 PM 1145 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2196 days


03-21-2018 01:50 PM

My brothers to make knives and has a birthday coming up. I was wondering if any of you who make small things like knife scales could offer some advice on valuable tools to do so. I see things in catalogs like finger planes and small shaping tools, or perhaps a particularly useful gouge or the perfect size and shape rasp for the task.

Thanks,
Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


8 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1482 posts in 363 days


#1 posted 03-21-2018 02:49 PM

well, since you did not mention your budget, I would suggest a bench tool:

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2581 days


#2 posted 03-21-2018 05:50 PM

2×72 belt grinder. That’s what most of them use.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2196 days


#3 posted 03-21-2018 05:55 PM

Thanks guys. He has the grinder for making the knives. A really nice one 2×72 with variable speed. I was thinking along the lines of some hand tools or something to help him shape the wood handles/grips he puts on the knives.

Small shaping tools or something else valuable to that task.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7329 posts in 3568 days


#4 posted 03-21-2018 05:57 PM

Brian I have a birthday coming up soon too!
I think the suggestion by John, post#1, is a real good choice.
I want to rebuild my wife’s favorite knives as most of them are over 50 years old and the scales are in really bad shape.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View JayT's profile

JayT

5960 posts in 2412 days


#5 posted 03-21-2018 06:04 PM

I could definitely see some rifflers being useful for getting areas that the belt grinder can’t get to. I use them when making planes for shaping and smoothing small areas or in tight places. Make sure to get good quality. I’ve got some by Corradi that are very good, Auriou also makes premium quality ones.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

291 posts in 617 days


#6 posted 03-27-2018 12:16 PM

Brian,

I’m going to second Jay’s suggestion on the Auriou and especially the rifflers.

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=53823&cat=1,42524

Iain

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

602 posts in 1695 days


#7 posted 03-28-2018 01:06 AM

Beyond some already mentioned small files/riflers, and power sanding equipment,
what most knife handle makers could always use is unusual or cool handle materials!

Exotic antler can be expensive, and would be nice gift they might not buy otherwise.

Highly figured exotic hard woods (like watefall bubinga) are always fun to use on a knife, if you have any laying around.

Mosiac pin stock is also something nice to have on hand. You can buy it or make something special you want to add personal touch.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2844 posts in 783 days


#8 posted 03-28-2018 10:34 AM

If you (or your brother) prefer hand tools, I handle knives using a spokeshave, rasps / rifflers, and a Morakniv carving knife I handled myself, similar to this one I made for a friend. For a spokeshave, the Lie-Nielsen Boggs Spokeshave is what I reach for most often, but the small bronze one would probably be more useful for shaping knife scales.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

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