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Forum topic by ShoelessJoe49 posted 03-21-2018 02:18 AM 477 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShoelessJoe49

5 posts in 485 days


03-21-2018 02:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane question pine sharpening

Hello, my name is Daniel

I just got my birthday present in the mail today and was wanting to ask two questions. I got a wood river #6 hand plane. I just got a piece of scrap pine and made a few passes. I have not sharpened the blade yet, so the passes I took were with the blade just being factory sharp. Also when answering keep in mind that I used soft pine, if that makes a difference. Finally, I am brand BRAND new to woodworking.

Question 1

After taking the first few passes I noticed the wood I passed over was rough. Not smooth at all. I will assume that the blade needs to be further sharpened. Can someone please comment on this?

Question 2

Concerning whet stones. I purchased a 1000/6000 combo stone. When someone says I sharpened the blade to such and such grit, how does that difference in grit affect the wood being planed? Second, if I sharpen the plane iron to 6000 grit, will that do for everyday plane use? Thanks for your help.


11 replies so far

View Mr_Pink's profile

Mr_Pink

100 posts in 427 days


#1 posted 03-21-2018 02:33 AM

Are you planing against the grain? It sounds like you might be getting tear out.

Either way, sharpening isn’t a bad idea, and 6000 grit will be fine for now.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9721 posts in 1542 days


#2 posted 03-21-2018 04:06 AM

Can of worms this question:)

Yeah it’ll work. You still have setup the iron with at least a little camber.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View EricLew's profile

EricLew

211 posts in 1422 days


#3 posted 03-21-2018 04:10 AM

I recently bought a WoodRiver 4 1/2. I was just getting into Planes, and I love that plane. They are very very nice. Not Lie-Neilsen or Veritas, but not too far behind. The blade does need to be honed when you get it, but they are in pretty decent shape out of the box.

As Mr. Pink said you may be planing against the grain. Flip the piece around and see if that makes any difference. There are hundreds, thousands of videos on YouTube about setting up a new plane and honing the blade. You will get many different opinions and techniques.

Rob Cosman is a consultant for WoodCraft and has many videos on how to setup brand new WoodRiver planes. Since that is the brand you have, you should watch some of his videos.

Paul Sellers is a hand tool woodworking expert, I am addicted to his videos, and I am a power tool woodworker.

You will see vast differences in their philosophies, Paul Sellers never hones past 1,200 grit, while Rob Cosman goes up to 18,000 grit I think.

Both of them, and many other’s videos will be a great help

-- I love the smell of coffee in the morning, and sawdust in the afternoon

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9721 posts in 1542 days


#4 posted 03-21-2018 04:47 AM

Definitely check out some videos on sharpening.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1236 posts in 2051 days


#5 posted 03-21-2018 12:27 PM

Your 1000/6000 will work fine. You can also go down to Hobby Lobby or a similar place and buy a 3” wide strip of leather and the green polishing compound stick to make a strop. That will put a nice polish on the edge after the 6k. Should be doable for less than $10. You might also consider a honing guide unless you are already an accomplished hand sharpener. Even the $15 ones work pretty good.

Softer woods can crush the grain when planed with a less than sharp blade. So if you flip it around and still have issues, sharpen and see what happens. Check oujt a YouTube video on how to read the grain if you are unsure of how too tell if you are going with or against.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3003 posts in 1536 days


#6 posted 03-21-2018 01:30 PM

Daniel, You will learn that sharpening is like BBQ’ing. It can all come out OK but lots of different ways to get there.

IMO – the 1000/6000 stone is ok. After you get your feet wet, you may want to a higher grit, like 8 or 10K. Personally I go to 8000 followed with a few strokes on a leather strop.

You will also want a coarser stone for a couple reasons: first, for those times when you forget and go way past when you should have rehoned (happens all the time esp a newbie), second for flattening the backs of chisels and irons.

A new plane always needs to be “commissioned” as some say. This involves a thorough cleaning with a solvent like laquer thinner. Take the frog off and clean everything thoroughly. I also take all the screws out (including the totes), clean & coat with oil.

Storing your plane is also important. Keep it out of a humid environment or it will rust. Coat with Jatoba oil after every use. Every few months (even if not used) take the blade assembly apart, remove the frog, clean & oil.

Before you hone it you need to flatten the back of the iron. My experience with the WR’s is pretty good, but every one so far has required some work to get the back flat (some a little, some a lot). Start with a coarse stone and work up to a polish. Lots of videos on how to do this. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just flat all the way across the cutting edge. Be sure you’re stone is dead flat.

You will also have to address the corners of the iron. This is true of every plane. This reduces the tendency to leave tracks when planing face grain. Two ways to do this: camber & round off edges. Cambering a blade comes with little twist to the honing. I prefer to ease the corners on the longer planes like 6, 7, 8 because I want a flat iron for jointing.

You will have to decide whether to use a jig or freehand. I recommend learning freehand. Also, use a secondary bevel. Again, lots of videos on this.

Learning to read the grain will become second nature the more you use a hand plane. It gets a little tricky sometimes because the grain can switch and swirl especially around knots, certain species of wood, and the way the board is sawn.

Get some paraffin wax and keep a cube handy to dress up the sole ;-)

Hope this helps Good luck!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ShoelessJoe49's profile

ShoelessJoe49

5 posts in 485 days


#7 posted 03-21-2018 05:53 PM

Thanks very very much all,

Every one of these comment really helped quite a bit. I will go work on the things you all recommended. I guess reading the grain of the wood will just have to come in time. One last question I forgot to ask the first time. Should the manufacturers bevel be 25 degrees? Then the “microbevel” be 30 degrees? Is that the standard? Keeping in mind I am not at the point where I am doing anything fancy. Just simple use at this time. Thanks one more time for your advice. It was more helpful than I expected.

Daniel

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1236 posts in 2051 days


#8 posted 03-21-2018 05:59 PM

On a bevel down plane like this the exact bevel angle doesn’t matter as much. A 25 degree primary bevel is plenty strong enough, and a 30 degree micro bevel is very common. Some manufacturers habe a 30 primary bevel. If yours has that, dont regrind. You could go 32 for your micro bevel in that case. It won’t matter.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1737 posts in 2045 days


#9 posted 03-21-2018 09:27 PM



Question 1

After taking the first few passes I noticed the wood I passed over was rough. Not smooth at all. I will assume that the blade needs to be further sharpened. Can someone please comment on this?

Question 2

Concerning whet stones. I purchased a 1000/6000 combo stone. When someone says I sharpened the blade to such and such grit, how does that difference in grit affect the wood being planed? Second, if I sharpen the plane iron to 6000 grit, will that do for everyday plane use? Thanks for your help.

- ShoelessJoe49

#1 – sharpen the blade. If you think the factory blade was sharp, redefine your expectation of sharp. As others said flip the wood around. There are a lot of charts showing how to read the grain.

#2 – Its really more of a question of edge life vs effect on the wood. A blade sharpened with the 1000 gr will work fine for a short time, but the edge will begin to fracture and break down more quickly vs if honed with the 6000gr. One thing to note is not all mfr grit callouts are the same, oil stones vs waterstones vs film or sandpaper. It’s all very confusing. Ron Hock of Hock tools recommends at least a 5 um maximum grit size for any type work. Personally I go to 0.3um for smoothing irons, and don’t use strops, and I’m in the minority.

View ShoelessJoe49's profile

ShoelessJoe49

5 posts in 485 days


#10 posted 03-21-2018 10:32 PM

Brian, thanks for the assist. OSU55, I appreciate your comments as well. There seems to be quite a debate about strops. I think I will stay clear of them for a while at least until I am more experienced.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1737 posts in 2045 days


#11 posted 03-22-2018 12:36 AM

I have hand plane tuning and choosing entries in my blog, just to add to the info overload.

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