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Finishing QSWO table top HELP!!

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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 03-20-2018 04:47 PM 673 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

3090 posts in 1625 days


03-20-2018 04:47 PM

Guys,

I need some advice on finishing a QSWO table top.

The top is 42X84 and will have walnut breadboard ends with a walnut strip lengthwise down the middle.

The top is in two sections now and I figure its best to do some prefinishing before I glue up.

The wood is highly figured so I’m looking for the best result.

I’ve hesitated to post and thought I would just experiment on scrap, but I’ve researched so much now the information overload has got me all over the map with this, but here is my thought processes:

1. Fill grain vs. don’t fill grain? Dye or stain before or after filling? Or use a stainable filler? Oil or WB? I’m not looking for a glass smooth top.

2. Dye. If I go this route I would use an HVLP sprayer and WB dye to do this quickly as possible to get a uniform result. Sand, redye as needed, seal and top coat.

3. Good ‘ol Danish oil. I’ve gotten decent results with Dk Walnut and some sanding.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


19 replies so far

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splintergroup

2304 posts in 1366 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 05:01 PM

These are all opinions 8^)

If you use filler, you will change how the surface looks when light is reflecting off at an angle. In my opinion it gives a more “plastic” finish look then leaving the wood surface unmodified. Dyes are great for changing the color/tone and I really like them over stains. Applied to bare will really highlight the grain, if you don’t want this effect you should seal the surface a bit first (shellac). You can also use the dye in the topcoats as a toner, but this increases the chances of streaks showing up if you are not careful while spraying.

Danish oil is what I like for the base/color coat. Very simple and easy but some woods don’t really like to absorb much of the color.

Take your own advice, test on scrap 8^)

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RobS888

2490 posts in 1989 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 05:04 PM

Medium walnut danish oil and several (5) coats of Satin Arm-R-Seal look great on well sanded white oak.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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pintodeluxe

5757 posts in 2957 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 05:26 PM

No grain filler on QSWO in my opinion.

Either a nice oil based stain, or the Jeff Jewitt method. The latter is more labor intensive, but highlights the figure beautifully. Here is a collection of stains and dye on a QSWO sample board… http://lumberjocks.com/pintodeluxe/blog/35559

Either way, a lacquer topcoat with satin sheen is my preference.

But… Prefinishing a top before glueup? Whhaatt?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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a1Jim

117234 posts in 3721 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 05:48 PM

It depends what end results you want if you want it to remain as light as possible then a water born top coat is in order, if you’re going darker then I agree with using a dye to keep the grain visible, I like General finishes dye/stain and then a top coat, again WB if your spraying.

Here’s what a table I did a month or so ago looks like with Just Polycryclics one of the few Minwax products I recommend, I like water base better than lacquer because I have problems with fumes.

https://www.amazon.com/Minwax-63333444-Polycrylic-Protective-Finish/dp/B000BZYYH4/ref=sr_1_4?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1521567652&sr=1-4&keywords=polycrylic&dpID=51Kn5V7ApKL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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Rich

3651 posts in 734 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 05:51 PM

Jeff Jewitt has a PDF document of mission QSWO finish recipes on his site. It’s worth taking a look to see if any of them appeal to you. I believe he also has a video of the process.

http://homesteadfinishingproducts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/mission_oak_6-2016.pdf

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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rwe2156

3090 posts in 1625 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 08:13 PM

Thanks all.

Pinto the reason I haven’t glued up is if I use a dye I don’t want to dye the walnut.

Jim yes I want to be on the darker side to reduce the contrast with the walnut. I’m going to experiment with some walnut and dk brown dyes.

Rich I’ll take a look at that again but I thought he used gel stains.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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AandCstyle

3164 posts in 2401 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 09:24 PM

RWE, like the others, I don’t fill qswo. I do highly recommend Jeff Jewitt’s Mission Oak finishes, but lately have been using the simplest finishing schedule ever-MinWax Golden Oak stain followed by 3-4 coats of Arm-R-Seal. Here is a sample. I really love the feel of this finish. I apologize if this adds to your info overload. Please post pix of your project.

-- Art

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

482 posts in 2359 days


#8 posted 03-21-2018 02:30 AM

I was doing some QSWO frames for my wife and did a bunch fo small test pieces with various finishes. If you decide you want to try the ammonia fuming method but don’t want to build the tent, I was able to get reasonable results just wiping on a really wet coat of 10% ammonia and letting it sit for about 15 seconds and then wiping it off and letting it dry. It was equivalent to about 15 to 20 minutes fuming for the test samples I did.

The image below shows a test sample. The slightly darker right side is the ammonia wipe on and I think it brings out the rays better than the other. The top is one dye mix and the bottom is another, so left to right the difference is the ammonia wipe.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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Sunstealer73

169 posts in 2237 days


#9 posted 03-21-2018 02:53 AM

I do Watco Dark Walnut Danish Oil, wait at least 3 days, then blonde dewaxed shellac, sand with 320, and finally poly. It’s easy and looks great.

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pintodeluxe

5757 posts in 2957 days


#10 posted 03-21-2018 04:37 AM

Walnut will take dye or stain beautifully, and will stay darker than the oak. You have me worried about the pre-finishing part!!! I’m very worried.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Dustin

557 posts in 885 days


#11 posted 03-21-2018 11:55 AM



Walnut will take dye or stain beautifully, and will stay darker than the oak. You have me worried about the pre-finishing part!!! I m very worried.

- pintodeluxe

What pinto said. If you glue up after dyeing, how are you going to clean off the glue sufficiently such that: 1) it doesn’t remove so much material that it affects the already treated surfaces, and 2) that you remove any excess glue sufficiently such that it does not interfere with your topcoat? It seems like this will be a massive headache.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4988 posts in 2495 days


#12 posted 03-21-2018 12:14 PM

It seems to me that that after final glue up you are going to have to do some sanding. If you have the oak part pre-finished then you will lose that and it will be wasted effort in fact it might cause more work if you have to sand it all off to get an even surface. Glue up first, then finish.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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OSU55

1861 posts in 2134 days


#13 posted 03-21-2018 12:30 PM

Proper finish design is important. Appearance and color are one thing, application is something else. How will the top be used – dining table with heavy use or more something to look at? This drives the topcoat type and possibly filled or not finish and film thickness. This in turn drives how to color to work with required top coat.

I agree you do not want to prefinish any of it. The walnut will most likely not show anything you do to the qswo.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3090 posts in 1625 days


#14 posted 03-21-2018 12:47 PM

Thx all. Bondo, Pinto, Dustin—Advice taken. Gluing up first :-).

AC, I will definitely think about a stain. It wasn’t on my list because I am concerned with such a large surface getting it applied evenly. Don’t worry or treat it like a dye and spray it?

I’ve decided I will test a dye, stain, and Danish oil. I’ve used Danish oil on QSWO in the past but didn’t get quite the contrast I want for this top. But I didn’t do much sanding to remove color from flecks, either.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

482 posts in 2359 days


#15 posted 03-21-2018 01:19 PM

I’m not sure why the resistance to assembly of pre-finished pieces?

1. Plan your joinery strategy to avoid significant glue squeeze out (glue catch cutouts, chamfered mortise tops, etc).
2. Do initial dry assembly and scrape, sand, etc to get it where you want.
3. Tape off the tenons and other places you want the glue to stick.
4. Finish each piece exactly as desired.
5. Glue up then go to final topcoats.

I don’t see anything wrong with doing the Walnut say in an oil to just pop the grain and add some richness and then going WB dye on the QSWO and then assembling. Trying to apply a WB dye to the QSWO parts while avoiding getting any on the walnut pieces would drive me crazy.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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