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Forum topic by Planeman40 posted 03-20-2018 02:02 PM 644 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Planeman40

1306 posts in 2957 days


03-20-2018 02:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: psychology

I have often wondered why I am driven to build things. This finally answers it.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/handiwork-how-busy-hands-can-alter-our-brain-chemistry/

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!


9 replies so far

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Woodknack

12426 posts in 2576 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 04:21 PM

Be wary of science in the media, the article doesn’t reference a study, it’s just one psychologist opinion based on a study of rats. There might be something to it, there might not, but the article is written to appeal emotionally rather than rationally.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 844 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 06:42 PM

Very interesting article, Rufus. Thanks for sharing. I know I’m happier when my hands are busy!

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Planeman40

1306 posts in 2957 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 10:03 PM

Hello Rick. What you say is very true. However this has the ring of truth to me. After your post, I searched the term “Kelly Lambert, a neuroscientist at the University of Richmond” on the Internet. She is not a psychologist but is a faculty member at the University of Richmond as Professor of Behavioral Neuroscience. That is enough for me. Her bio can be read here: https://www.kellylambertlab.com/about/. She is cute too!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Kazooman

1236 posts in 2149 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 10:36 PM

Have to agree with Rick on this one. An all too typical media fluff piece. The linked bio does not really impress either. As far as the “she is cute too” comment goes, I am at a loss. If there is time left in your “edit window” you might consider deleting it.

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Woodknack

12426 posts in 2576 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 10:42 PM

“Ring of truth” is good marketing and exactly what I mean that it has emotional appeal. Anyone who works with their hands will want to believe it. We want to look for a peer reviewed paper or study related to humans and hopefully corroborating studies. It appears to be one doctor’s opinion based on studies of mice. My computer died this morning so I haven’t really looked into it. It is suggestive but I wouldn’t put much stock in it. These things come and go, people remember the news story but never hear about it being debunked down the road.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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clin

954 posts in 1192 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 11:14 PM

I certainly believe something like this is true. Don’t know if it really has to do with using my hands. But, there’s no question I get a boost of some sort of “feel-good” in my brain when I accomplish something. If I’m in a bad mood and just don’t want to do even a few household tasks, but have to get them done, I’m surprised how much better I can feel once I do something.

Perhaps it’s not true for everyone, but I know that I feel better if I’m getting things done. Doesn’t have to be important. Doesn’t matter much what it is. Can be anything from fixing something around the house, to gassing up the car, to fixing a bug in a software program, to solving a crossword puzzle.

One thing I have noticed in some people, they just seem to be driven to constantly be doing something. Just can’t sit still. They just don’t seem to be happy if they aren’t doing something. My wife had an aunt like that. When she would visit, I’d almost have to say something like “Hey, lets get your car unpacked, then you can start pruning the rose bushes”

-- Clin

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Kazooman

1236 posts in 2149 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 11:51 PM

I have to agree with you, Clin. I have always been this way myself. Back in my college days as a science jock I gravitated towards areas of research where you really got “up close and personal” with your experiments. No theoretical science for me! I always wanted to have a hand in every step.

Fast forward to my woodworking hobby. I enjoy making small pieces that require me to learn (note I did not say master) some new technique. A small box with finger joints with the top joint being a miter and beveled to boot comes to mind. Lots of fun learning that! Alas, I haven’t used the technique since. Still, I enjoy the feeling of “I made that!”.

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MrRon

5189 posts in 3440 days


#8 posted 03-23-2018 01:10 AM

It is man as the hunter/ provider that drives him to work with his hands. Back before you could buy what you wanted from a store, it was necessary to build if it needed to be done. Early settlers had to cut down trees to build their homes. Furniture also had to be built; fencing for animals, etc. I guess you could call it instinct. It resides in all of us and it comes to the surface when it becomes necessary; a part of survival.

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PCDub

83 posts in 440 days


#9 posted 03-23-2018 01:24 AM

“man as hunter/provider” does nothing to explain why women have the same desires and feelings about making things…just sayin’

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