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Repairs required to Oak Table

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Forum topic by anthm27 posted 03-20-2018 06:37 AM 516 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


03-20-2018 06:37 AM

My Friend had this table custom built of OAK in Japan.

Its very new, only a week old actually and already cracks appearing. Can anybody give advice if this is repairable and how? The obvious of course glue and clamp. Anybody can elaborate? Thanks in advance.

Regards
Anthm


19 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10244 posts in 3610 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 06:48 AM

Maybe caused by central heating. Japan is a
humid country and the maker may not have
anticipated the climate it was being shipped to
by bringing the moisture content down prior
to glue-up. This would not be surprising as
furniture shops are not typically set up with
kilns in house. Or it could be just sloppy quality
control.

A room humidifier might help. The cracks may
close up in the warmer months on their own.

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 06:53 AM


Maybe caused by central heating. Japan is a
humid country. Central heating breaks guitars
especially. I d say send it back to Japan but it
may be cost-prohibitive.

A room humidifier might help.

- Loren

Thanks for the reply, actually he lives in Japan and yes runs central heating. Its gonna be hard to take watching this thing crack more. The guy that made it lives locally so I suspect he should have been aware of the circumstances.

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Loren

10244 posts in 3610 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 07:03 AM

Edited my reply while you were posting. Sam
Maloof in his book mentioned cracking because
I guess he got a lot of repair inquiries. He
said to leave it alone because what the piece
wanted was a more humid climate.

There are exceptions of course due to rushed
production of furniture panels where it’s the
maker’s fault for not allowing milled boards
to acclimate and move before jointing and
gluing.

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 07:05 AM



Edited my reply while you were posting. Sam
Maloof in his book mentioned cracking because
I guess he got a lot of repair inquiries. He
said to leave it alone because what the piece
wanted was a more humid climate.

There are exceptions of course. Rushed production.

- Loren

Yes I saw the edit thank you. With the above comments of yours I am thinking leave it for a couple of months before doing anything, lets see if it gets worse.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

995 posts in 2780 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 11:34 AM

How is the top attached? It’s hard to tell from the photo, but I wonder if there is a square structure on each end that is attached to the top in a cross-grain orientation. If this is the case (without slotting the holes in the top of the square or using z-clips) it would inevitably lead to cracking.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Nathansiwem

1 post in 30 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 12:47 PM

You can fill the cracks with several different products, including wood putty, wax sticks, and shellac sticks.

Wood putty comes in a variety of colors, so you’re sure to find one to match the wood you’re working with.
Wax sticks are like hard crayons. You can use it before you apply the final finish and afterward. If you use it before applying the final finish, you need to seal the wood with shellac first.
Shellac sticks are easy to apply, you melt with a soldering iron and let drip into the surface imperfection. You then press it in with a putty knife or chisel and wait for it to harden. After the shellac is hard, you scrape it flush with a chisel or thin cabinet scraper and then sand it lightly with fine sandpaper.

I think your cracks are not so serious, if they do not grow.

-- Nathan Sullivan, Somerville, https://bestdrillbit.com/

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4680 posts in 2313 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 01:49 PM

The no. 1 thing is to figure out why it is cracking. The first thing to look for is how is the top attached to the base? Does it allow for movement? If not, that is your culprit and the table will have be reworked to allow for movement.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

2622 posts in 552 days


#8 posted 03-20-2018 03:29 PM

If I had a table custom made and one week later it was cracking, I’d raise raise hell with the seller. I would demand either a flawless repair, a replacement, or better yet, a refund so I could go buy one from a reputable source.

The notion of having to repair it yourself is ridiculous.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11475 posts in 2342 days


#9 posted 03-20-2018 03:52 PM

Send it back, get a refund.
The crack is a symptom of either poor wood selection or improper construction.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#10 posted 03-21-2018 07:35 AM



How is the top attached? It s hard to tell from the photo, but I wonder if there is a square structure on each end that is attached to the top in a cross-grain orientation. If this is the case (without slotting the holes in the top of the square or using z-clips) it would inevitably lead to cracking.

- jdh122

Thanks for the reply, Yes interesting point, Im still trying to find out exactly but yes the top is attached to square steel beam at either end, and seems the screws go through the beam into the wooden top. (are you saying possibly not enough play in the holes drilled into the steal beam?)
Regards
Anthm

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#11 posted 03-21-2018 07:37 AM



You can fill the cracks with several different products, including wood putty, wax sticks, and shellac sticks.

Wood putty comes in a variety of colors, so you’re sure to find one to match the wood you’re working with.
Wax sticks are like hard crayons. You can use it before you apply the final finish and afterward. If you use it before applying the final finish, you need to seal the wood with shellac first.
Shellac sticks are easy to apply, you melt with a soldering iron and let drip into the surface imperfection. You then press it in with a putty knife or chisel and wait for it to harden. After the shellac is hard, you scrape it flush with a chisel or thin cabinet scraper and then sand it lightly with fine sandpaper.

I think your cracks are not so serious, if they do not grow.

- Nathansiwem

Thank you for the reply, The Shellac thing is something I’ve had very little experience with.
Thanks for the advice.

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#12 posted 03-21-2018 07:39 AM



The no. 1 thing is to figure out why it is cracking. The first thing to look for is how is the top attached to the base? Does it allow for movement? If not, that is your culprit and the table will have be reworked to allow for movement.

- bondogaposis

Thanks for the reply, yes I am hearing you, maybe not enough play in the holes in the beams that the screw go through to attach to the table top.
Thanks

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#13 posted 03-21-2018 07:42 AM



If I had a table custom made and one week later it was cracking, I d raise raise hell with the seller. I would demand either a flawless repair, a replacement, or better yet, a refund so I could go buy one from a reputable source.

The notion of having to repair it yourself is ridiculous.

- Rich

Cheers for the reply, Yes there has been some of that, The manufacturer is in the picture and has asked for the table to sit for a few weeks and see if the cracks evolve.
Thanks
Regards
Anthm

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anthm27

223 posts in 1072 days


#14 posted 03-21-2018 07:42 AM



Send it back, get a refund.
The crack is a symptom of either poor wood selection or improper construction.

- Woodknack

Maybe this will be the final outcome,
Thanks for the reply

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10244 posts in 3610 days


#15 posted 03-21-2018 07:43 AM

It’s possible the beam holes were not appropriately
slotted. It would be a jawdropping oversight in a
shop set up to build fine furniture however.

Exposed panel ends like this are especially vulnerable
to problems. I saw a thread awhile back where
a shop with a showroom was having problems with
cracking ends in tables made from otherwise well-
seasoned wood. It turned out there was a heating
duct nearby I think. Even a big window can cause
problems with prolonged sun hitting a piece.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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