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Tips for Teak Needed Please

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Forum topic by Stew81 posted 03-20-2018 01:51 AM 699 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


03-20-2018 01:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: teak finishing traditional question

I bought a used set of Teak patio furniture today and I am hoping to get some tips for refinishing it before I dig into this project. I’d appreciate any info, tips, or warnings you guys could provide. I’ve never worked with teak so I’m not sure what the best finishing methods are.

I plan to get the old finish and grayed wood off with a mixture of scraping, planing and sanding. I’ve included a pic of the finish that the previous owner applied about 5 years ago. I’m going to disassemble the parts that are bolted together with brass bolts. Everything is still really tight for a 15 year set of patio furniture.

Re-assemble and re-finish with Watco Teak Oil from the Depot…. This is where I really need advice. Is teak oil the best finish? Do I just need to re-apply annually? Is this similar to applying Danish Oil? Is there a better finish out there that I should look at?

Also, there are a couple badges on the table that say “Nauteak Maritime Heritage” a google search didn’t turn up much”, does anyone know who this is? I was just curious because this seems like a well built set and I was interested in finding some history about the company.

Thanks in advance for any tips you can offer.

Edit: Sorry for the sideways pics!

-- Stew


25 replies so far

View mrg's profile

mrg

827 posts in 3049 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 02:24 AM

For my teak patio furniture I use teak oil on it every season. When it starts getting grey go heavy.

-- mrg

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4248 posts in 2359 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 02:32 AM

Next time buy plastic outdoor furniture. Not as nice as wood but a ton less work and upkeep.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Stew81's profile

Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 02:44 AM

Thanks for fixing the pics! I’ll probably agree with you by the time I’m done with these

-- Stew

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1044 posts in 958 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 02:46 AM

My dad always used varnish on the teak trim and rails on his fishing boats. Endured salt water and the rigors of serious fishing all season long. From my understanding, the oil won’t wear as long as the varnish but both will need to be reapplied occasionally.

Make sure you do a test of the Sikkens on an inconspicuous spot. It can result in an orange colored cast that you might not be expecting.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View jbay's profile

jbay

2414 posts in 949 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 02:52 AM

Very nice looking after refinishing, you got a keeper set there.
https://us.letgo.com/en/i/nauteak-maritime-heritage_c3ee5d20-5696-47fe-9c48-945cc95e8a56

Just oil every year, or as needed.

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Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 02:58 AM

I don’t plan on using the Sikkens, that’s just what was used on it last. I’m leaning toward the teak oil but I’ll get into my finishing books an see what type of varnish might work. Honestly, when someone says “varnish” I never know what they are talking about. Some people use it as a general term for Poly some people mean it literally (which I think means a poly/oil blend but I’m probably wrong). I’m just not as familiar with it as I am with oil, poly, or laquer finishes.

-- Stew

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Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 03:00 AM

That is nice jbay! Hopefully I can make it look something like that when I’m done!

-- Stew

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1494 posts in 1848 days


#8 posted 03-20-2018 04:02 AM

I say leave it natural. Clean it real good till you get to new wood and let it age naturally. Oils and all that other junk just attracts dust and dirt.
And makes you fight a losing battle against Mother Nature

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4248 posts in 2359 days


#9 posted 03-20-2018 05:07 AM



I say leave it natural. Clean it real good till you get to new wood and let it age naturally. Oils and all that other junk just attracts dust and dirt.
And makes you fight a losing battle against Mother Nature

- Aj2

To add to Aj2 comment. Perhaps if you choose that route I’m thinking a pressure washer and a deck cleaning agent. I did than to a cedar deck one time and it really cleaned it up pretty good.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2044 posts in 2994 days


#10 posted 03-20-2018 05:54 AM

Teak oil is no different than “tung oil,” Fromby’s Tung Oil” and so on. All are just boiled linseed oil with a little resin and thinner.

If this puppy is going outside, it “may” need UV protection. That isn’t part of the so called teak oil (they don’t really squeeze or steam teak trees to get the oil out of them).

I’m a huge fan of non-hardening oils, since they stop the wood from shrinking, then splitting and cracking. Too, they don’t require stripping, which is nice, since the items to which they are applied are, often, labor intensive, to keep them nice.

Using them means being aggressive early on in the game, but, once well into it, you can coast more and more. To get the oils in, you have to, of course, think them and apply them to all surfaces.

You can experiment. Consider looking into pine tar, boiled linseed oil and turpentine mixes, such as are applied to water craft, WWII guns and so on. They are easy to apply.

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 438 days


#11 posted 03-20-2018 06:25 AM

The table needs a good power wash before you do anything with it.

View Stew81's profile

Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


#12 posted 03-20-2018 01:14 PM

Good advice Kelly. I was thinking Teak Oil was a non-hardening oil but that’s why I wanted to ask this question. After reading your comment it got me thinking about Thompsons Water Seal, the original clear stuff, not the tinted version. What is Thompsons? Is that a non-hardening oil? If its good enough for decks its probably good enough for furniture.

As far as pressure washing, won’t that be bad for the joints? The chairs for instance are put together mostly with pegged slip tennons and some of those joints are reinforced with long brass bolts. Then the table top has a lot of tongue and groove joints. Maybe a very low pressure wash is in order. I just cant imagine forcing water into these joints would be a good thing.

-- Stew

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Stew81

43 posts in 1416 days


#13 posted 03-20-2018 01:54 PM

Okay. Maybe there is something to this pressure washing idea. This could be a time saver! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Sr48waapGs

-- Stew

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

86 posts in 154 days


#14 posted 03-20-2018 02:46 PM

Marine spar varnish.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2044 posts in 2994 days


#15 posted 03-20-2018 04:09 PM

First, if you pressure wash, use the white tip, which is the one with a very wide spray. Anything else is for carving wood. As they say, don’t ask me how I know (P.S. My pressure washer is 4000 PSI).

Over the years, I’ve heard a lot of complaints about Thompson’s. That could be because people expect a magic bullet from a can. That is, it needs to be done every year.

Some have said Thompson’s is emulsified wax. Dunno, but, if it is, I could see why it would not be the ideal finish.

As to oils, the first big job I did with non-hardening oil was my garage doors. I made them from leavings out of a spalt pile from a local cedar mill. People commented they didn’t know I had a garage and just thought it was tightly stacked [cedar] cord wood.

The first coat of oil soaked in like it was going out of style. Wherever it soaked in, I added more and kept doing it until it wouldn’t take more. In three months of what passes for summer on the northwest Washington coast, you couldn’t tell I’d done anything.

The next year, I hit it hard with the oil again. This one lasted———three months again.

The third coat was the deal breaker, in this case. Years later, it’s still obvious it was oiled. The thing is, the oil was not evaporating. It was just wicking deeper and deeper into the wood. As such, the coats were cumulative and built on each other. Of course, they were penetrating coats, rather than surface coats, like spar varnishes and other surface coats [that have to be stripped.

A qualifier on the spar varnish an other surface coats, you have to strip them only if you don’t stay on top of them, or they otherwise crack or lift.

By the way, the reason fences and other wood surfaces look horrible in a year or three after they get a surface coat is, the finish wasn’t flexible enough to shift with the wood, as it gained and lost moisture. That is why people use spar varnishes. They are what is called long oil fnishes. They have more oil so are more flexible.

My ideal exterior finish might be a piece which has been hit with oils until it’s saturated, then sealed with a light seal coat using a long oil finish. Dunno, never been patient enough to go there.

I have taken exterior finishes and added hardening oil (tung and boiled linseed) oil to them and even added motor oil and thinner. Those seemed to work too.

I had a [non-Pasadena] little old lady who had me finish her fence. Rather than fire up the airless, I used a garden pump up, which works if the product is thinned around 15%. I explained the “aggressive early on” thing to her and she went for it. I was able to do her 100’ fence in about an hour, using the pump up. She lived in one of the cookie cutter housing development (nice houses, postage stamp lots). Hers was the best looking fence around, and the easiest to maintain.

The oil replaced lost moisture, so the fence didn’t shrink, so didn’t suffer the usual cracks and splits. Too, the oil gave the wood (cedar) a nice golden glow.

I just used motor oil. Since there are greenies lurking, I won’t say it was used, but which, even if pitch black, will still produce the golden color on sun stained wood. Of course, such oil would not be a good candidate for something you’re going to be sitting on and rubbing against.

_
SIDE NOTE:

Many products say to only use so much. So do many otherwise expert painters. For example, one old boy thought I was stupid for thinning latex and letting it soak into my sixty year old shingles. He said it was wasting material. I asked him why, where did it go?

Keep in mind, these shingles where thin and dry. They were due for replacement. However, saturated with paint, then coated with more, they’ve gone another fifteen years and will go many more.

In short, the weather now has more finish between it and the old tar paper underneath the shingles and shakes.

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