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End grain cutting board glue up question

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Forum topic by Raythefirewoodguy posted 03-16-2018 06:39 PM 932 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


03-16-2018 06:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board glue up clamping

Don’t laugh now please
This doesn’t always happen to me but lately it seems that whenever I am doing the second glue up on my end graincutting boards that the center closes up solid but the ends have a space and if I tighten the clamps to close that space I end up with bent sides or wise cracked pieces. What am I doing wrong?
Thank you all for your help, Ray


16 replies so far

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LoJack

28 posts in 804 days


#1 posted 03-16-2018 08:13 PM

if I’m understanding correctly, the solution would be a hardwood piece like maple on each end of your glue up. On the second glue up, everything wants to flex a little more because you don’t have the continuous grain any longer. If you took a 2×2 piece of hardwood on each end to evenly disperse the clamping pressure it will likely fix that distorted look that you’re seeing on the second glue up

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LoJack

28 posts in 804 days


#2 posted 03-16-2018 08:15 PM

Sorry and also should probably investigate the equipment set up. It sounds like one of your tools has come out of square, and that degree or so it’s off gets compounded over each cut seeing that bow on the finished project.

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jerryminer

944 posts in 1583 days


#3 posted 03-16-2018 10:22 PM

Sounds like your parts are not equal in thickness from end to end. What’s your process for getting from first glue-up to second? Might be time to tune-up your equipment, or add a flattening step.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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msinc

519 posts in 645 days


#4 posted 03-17-2018 12:38 AM

Kind of along the lines of the last two posts…I do a lot of end grain inlays, so I glue up a lot of them. I find that, just like miters, everything goes way better if you take the time to get wood that is flat and square on four sides to begin with. I had the same problem as you are describing when I first got to gluing up end grain cutting boards and inlays. I mentioned miters because it showed up there too. I thought I needed some odd ball top secret rare expensive device to clamp them and I was wrong. I then figured it must be the device I am using to cut the miter and I was wrong again. For sure, you have to have a good clamp set up and you have to have a device capable of cutting exactly 45 degrees…but none of them will help if the stock is not flat and square on all four sides.

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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


#5 posted 03-17-2018 03:02 AM

Thank you all for your thoughts.
I have a jointer and use it on one edge of the board..kiln dried wood, then I plane it, the first glue up goes well. It’s glue up number two, with the end grain up. So I am doing something wrong on the table saw. Is the answer a sled for my table saw?

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msinc

519 posts in 645 days


#6 posted 03-17-2018 04:07 AM


Thank you all for your thoughts.
I have a jointer and use it on one edge of the board..kiln dried wood, then I plane it, the first glue up goes well. It s glue up number two, with the end grain up. So I am doing something wrong on the table saw. Is the answer a sled for my table saw?

- Raythefirewoodguy

Maybe, but I doubt it. I mean, if you saw the laminates and they measure the same, first to last then it is not the table saw or the way you are cutting them. This is kinda easy, but are you setting the grain opposite when you glue up the second go around? Even that is not a big deal with most wood, especially if its good and dry. I usually try to set up the grain for the best look, not necessarily each being the opposite way so it don’t warp or stress. Sometimes it is the wood itself. I have had boards that have enough stress they will bow after being cut and laminated. Usually this is due to them not being as dry as they need to be. If we drop back to when you first get the wood are you checking it with a moisture meter? This may sound simple, but about the only thing that can mess up or change wood that is flat and square on four sides is moisture, be it too much or too little.

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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


#7 posted 03-18-2018 11:55 AM

Thank you msinc
Kiln dried wood so I never thought of moisture. I do have a moisture meter. I will have to check.
Very frustrating as I just went from two end grain cutting boards to end grain coasters.

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jaidee

51 posts in 2921 days


#8 posted 03-18-2018 01:25 PM

Adding to Ray’s last post, i sometimes encounter changes in the flatness of the wood between glue ups, especially when mixing species in the same board. Whether it was the glue itself or the air in my shop, my solution was to leave first cut slightly oversize and run the first glue up through the planer to final thickness before cutting the strips for 2nd glue up on tablesaw. This seems to have eliminated this problem for me so far. Hope you find the solution for you…..it can be so frustrating.

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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jerryminer

944 posts in 1583 days


#9 posted 03-18-2018 07:00 PM


It s glue up number two, with the end grain up. So I am doing something wrong on the table saw. Is the answer a sled for my table saw?

- Raythefirewoodguy

What is your process between glue-up one and glue-up two? Do you joint and plane the glue-up? After ripping the slab apart, before gluing #2, can you check that the ends, when clamped, measure the same as the center? Sounds like there is a difference here, which should be addressed before glue-up #2.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


#10 posted 03-19-2018 07:25 PM

Jerry, are used pair of digital calipers the centerpieces are exactly 1 inch and pieces are .98 Each piece very consistent 1 inch at the center. 98 on the ends. I have made more than a few end grain boards and have only run into this problem once or twice but now lately it’s every board. Again I can only assume it’s me. What am I doing wrong what if I started to do wrong? I keep going back to a table saw sled any thoughts would be appreciated

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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


#11 posted 03-19-2018 07:27 PM

I should’ve reread that before I sent it. So the center pieces are exactly 1 inch and ends of the strips are .98

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jerryminer

944 posts in 1583 days


#12 posted 03-19-2018 09:13 PM

I think it’s your flattening/planing process before the last rip (ripping just makes the pieces equal in final thickness = height of the board)—your issue is the width of the final pieces, which = thickness at dimensioning stage between glue-up 1 and glue-up 2.

Are your planer knives worn in the center and creating a slight crown in the slab?

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Raythefirewoodguy

16 posts in 248 days


#13 posted 03-20-2018 01:55 AM

I would have never thought of that. I will be checking first thing tomorrow.
Jerry thanks for your help

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jaidee

51 posts in 2921 days


#14 posted 04-02-2018 03:08 PM

If blades are good, maybe you are getting a little snipe at the ends?

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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sras

4880 posts in 3271 days


#15 posted 04-02-2018 03:23 PM

I have experienced this a few times. At least in a couple of these cases I remember clamping aggressively.

I have a thought on how this might correlate to the cracking but nothing factual. The wood at the edges can compress more easily than fibers in the middle of the board. It may be that I managed to crush the wood at the edges which would make the edge pieces thinner.

I have paid more attention to not clamp excessively and I have not seen the issue again.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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