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Forum topic by Raymer posted 03-16-2018 06:38 PM 500 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymer

5 posts in 47 days


03-16-2018 06:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: oak bandsaw

Hello all, I am new to the forum and have run into something I could really use some advice on.

I recently had a friend call me up and ask if I wanted some wood for free. I asked him if he always asks silly questions, where do I go?

I end up getting about 21 boards between 12-14’, 8 boards between 6-8’ and a dozen or so 3-5’ boards. All of them are 9.25” wide and 1.5” thick, red oak. They came out of a city building he was demoing and remodeling, so all planed and finished.

Some of this I will be using to pull the carpet off my stairway and retreading with it, along with the oak hand rails, newel posts and iron balusters. For that I think I need 1” thick. I may use some to make a nice table top, but for most of this, I think I would be better off re-sawing each 1.5” thick board into 2, 3/4” nominally, allowing me to do more with it. Seems kind of a waste to use 1 1/2 for most projects.

Sorry for the long winded post, but my problem and question is, if I acquire a 14” band saw, could I possibly do this myself? I have called around the local mills and none of them will touch it, for fear of hidden nails/screws, and I fully understand. I have been going through it all with magnets, making passes on all sides and am confident I am finding them all. It looks like my only option is to do it myself.

What is the least expensive band saw I could get to accomplish this? Is it even doable on boards this long? I do have roller extension stands and can get someone else to help on the output end. The picture below is a small sample of the wood.

Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


24 replies so far

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 59 days


#1 posted 03-16-2018 06:57 PM

If you’re going to buy a bandsaw do you really wanna cheap out, or get one that you won’t regret buying later because of all of the projects you want to do with it?

Buying new I wouldn’t go too cheap for the purpose of resawing. You could do it with the cheap saws, but by the time you got all of the finicky things figured out and got it cutting straight I think you’d be out of wood to cut.

Cheapest I would go is a Grizzly G0555.

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MrUnix

6587 posts in 2164 days


#2 posted 03-16-2018 07:03 PM

I have been going through it all with magnets, making passes on all sides and am confident I am finding them all.

That is no way to find hidden nails – not to mention staples, bb’s, stainless steel wood screws, etc… Get a cheap metal detector.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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splintergroup

1979 posts in 1187 days


#3 posted 03-16-2018 07:06 PM

9.5 inches of red oak will test “cheap” band saws and probably result in a bad cut. Controlling 14’ while resawing is also a challenge.

Best bet is to get a reasonable quality saw (one you can “grow” with) or find a buddy willing to cut it for you.

Alternatively you can resaw with a table saw and rip blade, raising the blade incrementally while cutting the board along the edges. This should (with a 10” saw) get you a kerf about 1/2 way through. At this point it is fairly easy to finish the cut accurately with a hand saw.

With either saw method you will need a way to smooth out the fresh sawn surface.

Red oak is relatively inexpensive, it may be easiest of all to just buy lumber in the thickness you need and keep this thicker stuff for a time when you can use it as-is.

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UncleBuck

115 posts in 45 days


#4 posted 03-16-2018 07:13 PM

i realize a mill would not want to mill these but there are blades meant for cutting material with nails in it on mine if you were here i would mill it and charge you for the blades i mess up you may not have any nails in it at all. i agree with everyone else get a good band saw . offer to buy a nail cutting blade not sure how much they are but cheaper than a new saw unless you want a new one .

-- Terry Uncle Buck Carvins "woodworking minus patience equals firewood "

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 59 days


#5 posted 03-16-2018 07:20 PM



9.5 inches of red oak will test “cheap” band saws and probably result in a bad cut. Controlling 14 while resawing is also a challenge.

- splintergroup

I forgot to mention that he’ll probably want to build a sled and grab some roller stands too. I don’t envy him for the task that’s for sure.

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Loren

10260 posts in 3612 days


#6 posted 03-16-2018 07:35 PM



Red oak is relatively inexpensive, it may be easiest of all to just buy lumber in the thickness you need and keep this thicker stuff for a time when you can use it as-is.

- splintergroup

+1

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Raymer

5 posts in 47 days


#7 posted 03-16-2018 07:40 PM

Thanks for the replies. I will get a cheap metal detector and try that, don’t want to invest in an expensive one. However, when I said a cheap band saw, I guess that is relative. My budget is between $1,000-$1,200 for a bandsaw and will probably want to pickup up an extra blade or two with it

I do have roller stands, six of them actually, nice and heavy ones that roll smoothly. I think my biggest challenge is controlling the long boards. I could cut them down in more manageable lengths, but seems like it is always best to keep long boards long, until you know what you’ll use them for, so as not to limit what can be done with them.

Again, thanks for the feedback, I will take a look at that Grizzly. My main question though os this doable of you take your time with it. I have no real experience with a band saw, so would spend some time with some cheaper pine to practice with.

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Raymer

5 posts in 47 days


#8 posted 03-16-2018 07:56 PM


Red oak is relatively inexpensive, it may be easiest of all to just buy lumber in the thickness you need and keep this thicker stuff for a time when you can use it as-is.

- splintergroup

+1

- Loren

Thanks, I thought red oak was fairly pricey, 8 to 10 bucks a foot.

If I just kerp this wood as is, what are some good projects I could do with it at 1 1/2 inch thick?

Also, I’m not sure I want to not do this, as this was all the excuse I needed to convince my wife I need a band saw. Haha

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GoingUp

9 posts in 212 days


#9 posted 03-16-2018 08:01 PM

http://www.grizzly.com/products/17-Bandsaw-2-HP/G0513

http://www.rockler.com/laguna-1412-14-bandsaw

Both seem to have good reviews. Grizzly may require 220V (can run off 110v supposedly), Laguna can run off 110. Both have 12” resaw capacity. The grizzly has a bit of an odd blade length, but will handle the 3/4” resaw blades better. 14” is a tighter curve than most 3/4” blades like (3/4” blades have thicker steel that usually causes the issue.) Just what my research indicated. Was in the same boat as you looking for a band saw with these capabilities, looked hard at those two until I found a deal on a G0555 from a family member.

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Andybb

915 posts in 568 days


#10 posted 03-16-2018 08:04 PM

Don’t buy a band saw based on low price. Not going to get into the “what band saw should I buy?” thing but for $1100 you could buy a Laguna 1412 and a 3/4” Resaw King blade and know that it will work. (or a Rikon). Yes, there are good blades that are less $ (Woodslicer, Kerfmaster etc.) than the Resaw King but that blade is awesome and the carbide can be resharpened. Seems like you have a lot to cut so my advice would be to either try the Resaw King or buy 3 or 4 of the cheaper blades as they dull quickly.

I spent the last year researching and agonizing over a BS purchase and bought the Laguna. Plenty of vids and reviews on youtube. Here’s my recent lj post and a short vid I just posted on youtube. It actually has a 13” resaw capacity. Last night I put it to the test and resawed 12.5”x2” oak and it really did cut like butter with almost no resistance.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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splintergroup

1979 posts in 1187 days


#11 posted 03-16-2018 08:22 PM


Red oak is relatively inexpensive, it may be easiest of all to just buy lumber in the thickness you need and keep this thicker stuff for a time when you can use it as-is.

- splintergroup

+1

- Loren

Thanks, I thought red oak was fairly pricey, 8 to 10 bucks a foot.

If I just kerp this wood as is, what are some good projects I could do with it at 1 1/2 inch thick?

Also, I m not sure I want to not do this, as this was all the excuse I needed to convince my wife I need a band saw. Haha

- Raymer

Around here (which typically is considered “expensive”), red oak runs about $3-$4/bf. The $8-$10 price sounds like Lowes or Home Depot pricing.

Anyway, 1-1/2” is good for table legs 8^)

I needed to resaw a bunch of wide white oak boards and in a similar situation to yours, bought a bandsaw (MiniMax 16”). The saw worked great, but struggling with the long boards (also 14 feet) was a real challenge.
Best advice here is to figure out the size you need first, cut one of your planks down to length, then resaw. This way you are not trying to balance a long board and instead can concentrate on the cut.

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builtinbkyn

2199 posts in 905 days


#12 posted 03-16-2018 08:28 PM

Why don’t you keep them as is and then cut them up as you need them? You may require thinner stock for some projects and not others. And if the project required thinner stock, but also narrower, you can do that on a table saw. No need for a bandsaw, though I’m sure a shinny new bs would be welcome :) Really, why mill stock down that you don’t yet have a specific purpose for?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Andybb

915 posts in 568 days


#13 posted 03-16-2018 08:36 PM



Why don t you keep them as is and then cut them up as you need them? You may require thinner stock for some projects and not others.
- builtinbkyn

+1

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 59 days


#14 posted 03-16-2018 08:42 PM



Why don t you keep them as is and then cut them up as you need them? You may require thinner stock for some projects and not others. And if the project required thinner stock, but also narrower, you can do that on a table saw. No need for a bandsaw, though I m sure a shinny new bs would be welcome :) Really, why mill stock down that you don t yet have a specific purpose for?

- builtinbkyn

He did say he was going to start with the stairs

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3160 posts in 3196 days


#15 posted 03-16-2018 08:44 PM

I have the Grizzly G0555 and it won’t resaw more than 5 – 5 1/2 inches, For more capacity, you have to add the riser block. But that doesn’t change the motor HP. It is still the same. Just something to think about.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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