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One screw or two on Adirondack back slats?

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Forum topic by Live4Brew posted 03-16-2018 03:13 PM 233 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Live4Brew

42 posts in 2998 days


03-16-2018 03:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining tip

Does anyone have an opinion on screws for adirondack backs? I know many chairs have skinnier back slats than mine and most people probably only use on screw at each contact point..but I’ve been using two at each contact point (2 high, 2 low). Does anyone think two screws will cause issues when the wood inevitably swells and shrinks in weather?


7 replies so far

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ArtMann

936 posts in 781 days


#1 posted 03-16-2018 04:27 PM

What kind of trouble might you expect? Of course it is possible to mess up anything but if they look good when they are installed, I don’t think they would go bad later? I just use one stainless steel screw per slat on my Adirondak chairs but they are fairly narrow.

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Live4Brew

42 posts in 2998 days


#2 posted 03-16-2018 04:28 PM

Well, the slat will grow and shrink with moisture – with two screws I wonder if there will be an internal bind/stress that could cause premature wear or even break a screw. If it’s just one screw there’s nothing to keep it from swelling/shrinking

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ArtMann

936 posts in 781 days


#3 posted 03-16-2018 04:32 PM

You are over thinking this.

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Rich

2635 posts in 555 days


#4 posted 03-16-2018 05:29 PM

It’s going to depend on the width of the slats, the percent shrinkage of the wood you use and the variation in moisture. A good sealing finish will reduce the movement. There are several shrinkage calculators on the web you can use to get an idea of the movement you’ll have.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Jeremymcon

245 posts in 645 days


#5 posted 03-16-2018 05:35 PM

I think you’re over thinking this. I once heard Paul sellers say in a video of his that he doesn’t worry about wood movement until the piece reaches 5 inches in width. Do you have 5 inches or more between the screws? If not, I think you’ll probably be ok.

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Live4Brew

42 posts in 2998 days


#6 posted 03-16-2018 05:39 PM

Thanks all.. I tend to overthink wood projects. It’s a blessing and a curse.


I think you re over thinking this. I once heard Paul sellers say in a video of his that he doesn t worry about wood movement until the piece reaches 5 inches in width. Do you have 5 inches or more between the screws? If not, I think you ll probably be ok.

- Jeremymcon


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AAL

45 posts in 1392 days


#7 posted 03-16-2018 05:58 PM

If you are concerned about contraction/expansion you could drill the hole(s) in the slat slightly larger than the upper body dia. of the screw to provide room for contraction/expansion and leave the countersunk hole to the normal size/depth if using flat head screws.

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

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