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How long to acclimate

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Forum topic by Chris_T posted 04-30-2011 03:23 AM 3765 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris_T

94 posts in 2261 days


04-30-2011 03:23 AM

Tomorrow I will be going to pick up 200 board feet of basswood. The wood has been air drying for over a year so I’m sure it is dry. I will be putting it in my shop and really want to get using it right away. I know I shouldn’t do this so my question is how long should I let it acclimate in my shop? Is this really necessary? I will be buying the wood 100 miles south of me and my shop is not heated since it is so warm outside.


8 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2276 days


#1 posted 04-30-2011 03:29 AM

Depends greatly on how it is milled, is it still in the fir ?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#2 posted 04-30-2011 03:37 AM

Hi Chris
Just because wood has been drying for a year does not guarantee it is dry enough to use. I would first check it with a good moisture meter. It should be around 8%. If it checks out the longer you can let it acclimate the better . The shortest time period is a week but many people do not wait that long. Even after it has gone through it’s initial time of acclimating I still suggest cutting your wood oversize in length width and thickness and let it acclimate at least another 3+ days before using it in your project.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 2135 days


#3 posted 04-30-2011 09:28 AM

Waiting three weeks would be best. Even then you should do as a1Jim says, I still suggest cutting your wood oversize in length width and thickness and let it acclimate at least another 3+ days before using it in your project.
The problem with air dried lumber, comes when you’re nice perfect project is put in house, during the winter heating season, or in air-conditioned environment, that wood will dry even further, and then your project may become not so perfect.
This has happened to me.

I don’t think it is possible to get wood to 8% by air drying, even being in a very controlled environment, maybe 13% to 16%.
Or am I wrong????

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View ScottN's profile

ScottN

261 posts in 2147 days


#4 posted 04-30-2011 02:52 PM

I usually wait a week. Also depends on the difference in humidity levels of outside humidity levels (or where the wood has been stored) vs your shop humidity levels.

-- New Auburn,WI

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#5 posted 04-30-2011 03:59 PM

Good point EJ
I think it’s possible but not likely that air dried wood can get to 8% but probably not in a year unless you live in a hot dry climate. Regardless of how wood is dried I never build with wood over 10%. If you do your asking for lots of problems with wood movement ,cupping,twisting,ect.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

530 posts in 2122 days


#6 posted 05-02-2011 02:50 AM

Kiln dried I tend to let acclimate for about 7 to 10 days (depending where it was originally stored). Air dried – like bubinga says, is difficult, at best, to get under about 10%-12%. Like other folks have indicated make sure you have a good moisture meter that can give you an accurate MC reading. You don’t want to take the chance of building something really beautiful and watch it tear itself apart down the road.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3233 days


#7 posted 05-02-2011 02:58 AM

I have some white oak and spruce that was air dried. I get about 7-9% right now. Was probably out about a year or so.
- JJ

View Chris_T's profile

Chris_T

94 posts in 2261 days


#8 posted 05-02-2011 03:58 AM

Thank you for all your help. I don’t have a meter so I will wait a while.

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